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THEODOROS STAMOS (1922-1997)

 
Along with Jackson Pollock, Barnett Newman, and Willem de Kooning, Theodoros Stamos was part of the first generation of Abstract Expressionists. Like Newman, Stamos explored the possibilities of color which he combined with studies of light and location.
<br>
<br>This painting represents Stamos’s fascination with color, pushing both the surface and symbolic qualities in their placement and geometry. Within the canvas, one can see subtle influences of “primitive” or “mythological” shapes which pushes the viewer to consider their relation to both the painting in front of them and their place within a larger cosmos.
<br>
<br>The work is part of his Lefkada series, named after a Greek island. It is a nod to both Stamos’s Greek heritage (his father came from Lefkada) and to where he spent half of the year each year after 1976. The Lefkada series speaks to the mythological aspects of the canvas, and the influence of location on his process. 
<br>
<br>Stamos was also an important teacher, having taught at the famed Black Mountain College where one of his students was Kenneth Noland Along with Jackson Pollock, Barnett Newman, and Willem de Kooning, Theodoros Stamos was part of the first generation of Abstract Expressionists. Like Newman, Stamos explored the possibilities of color which he combined with studies of light and location.
<br>
<br>This painting represents Stamos’s fascination with color, pushing both the surface and symbolic qualities in their placement and geometry. Within the canvas, one can see subtle influences of “primitive” or “mythological” shapes which pushes the viewer to consider their relation to both the painting in front of them and their place within a larger cosmos.
<br>
<br>The work is part of his Lefkada series, named after a Greek island. It is a nod to both Stamos’s Greek heritage (his father came from Lefkada) and to where he spent half of the year each year after 1976. The Lefkada series speaks to the mythological aspects of the canvas, and the influence of location on his process. 
<br>
<br>Stamos was also an important teacher, having taught at the famed Black Mountain College where one of his students was Kenneth Noland Along with Jackson Pollock, Barnett Newman, and Willem de Kooning, Theodoros Stamos was part of the first generation of Abstract Expressionists. Like Newman, Stamos explored the possibilities of color which he combined with studies of light and location.
<br>
<br>This painting represents Stamos’s fascination with color, pushing both the surface and symbolic qualities in their placement and geometry. Within the canvas, one can see subtle influences of “primitive” or “mythological” shapes which pushes the viewer to consider their relation to both the painting in front of them and their place within a larger cosmos.
<br>
<br>The work is part of his Lefkada series, named after a Greek island. It is a nod to both Stamos’s Greek heritage (his father came from Lefkada) and to where he spent half of the year each year after 1976. The Lefkada series speaks to the mythological aspects of the canvas, and the influence of location on his process. 
<br>
<br>Stamos was also an important teacher, having taught at the famed Black Mountain College where one of his students was Kenneth Noland Along with Jackson Pollock, Barnett Newman, and Willem de Kooning, Theodoros Stamos was part of the first generation of Abstract Expressionists. Like Newman, Stamos explored the possibilities of color which he combined with studies of light and location.
<br>
<br>This painting represents Stamos’s fascination with color, pushing both the surface and symbolic qualities in their placement and geometry. Within the canvas, one can see subtle influences of “primitive” or “mythological” shapes which pushes the viewer to consider their relation to both the painting in front of them and their place within a larger cosmos.
<br>
<br>The work is part of his Lefkada series, named after a Greek island. It is a nod to both Stamos’s Greek heritage (his father came from Lefkada) and to where he spent half of the year each year after 1976. The Lefkada series speaks to the mythological aspects of the canvas, and the influence of location on his process. 
<br>
<br>Stamos was also an important teacher, having taught at the famed Black Mountain College where one of his students was Kenneth Noland Along with Jackson Pollock, Barnett Newman, and Willem de Kooning, Theodoros Stamos was part of the first generation of Abstract Expressionists. Like Newman, Stamos explored the possibilities of color which he combined with studies of light and location.
<br>
<br>This painting represents Stamos’s fascination with color, pushing both the surface and symbolic qualities in their placement and geometry. Within the canvas, one can see subtle influences of “primitive” or “mythological” shapes which pushes the viewer to consider their relation to both the painting in front of them and their place within a larger cosmos.
<br>
<br>The work is part of his Lefkada series, named after a Greek island. It is a nod to both Stamos’s Greek heritage (his father came from Lefkada) and to where he spent half of the year each year after 1976. The Lefkada series speaks to the mythological aspects of the canvas, and the influence of location on his process. 
<br>
<br>Stamos was also an important teacher, having taught at the famed Black Mountain College where one of his students was Kenneth Noland Along with Jackson Pollock, Barnett Newman, and Willem de Kooning, Theodoros Stamos was part of the first generation of Abstract Expressionists. Like Newman, Stamos explored the possibilities of color which he combined with studies of light and location.
<br>
<br>This painting represents Stamos’s fascination with color, pushing both the surface and symbolic qualities in their placement and geometry. Within the canvas, one can see subtle influences of “primitive” or “mythological” shapes which pushes the viewer to consider their relation to both the painting in front of them and their place within a larger cosmos.
<br>
<br>The work is part of his Lefkada series, named after a Greek island. It is a nod to both Stamos’s Greek heritage (his father came from Lefkada) and to where he spent half of the year each year after 1976. The Lefkada series speaks to the mythological aspects of the canvas, and the influence of location on his process. 
<br>
<br>Stamos was also an important teacher, having taught at the famed Black Mountain College where one of his students was Kenneth Noland Along with Jackson Pollock, Barnett Newman, and Willem de Kooning, Theodoros Stamos was part of the first generation of Abstract Expressionists. Like Newman, Stamos explored the possibilities of color which he combined with studies of light and location.
<br>
<br>This painting represents Stamos’s fascination with color, pushing both the surface and symbolic qualities in their placement and geometry. Within the canvas, one can see subtle influences of “primitive” or “mythological” shapes which pushes the viewer to consider their relation to both the painting in front of them and their place within a larger cosmos.
<br>
<br>The work is part of his Lefkada series, named after a Greek island. It is a nod to both Stamos’s Greek heritage (his father came from Lefkada) and to where he spent half of the year each year after 1976. The Lefkada series speaks to the mythological aspects of the canvas, and the influence of location on his process. 
<br>
<br>Stamos was also an important teacher, having taught at the famed Black Mountain College where one of his students was Kenneth Noland
Infinity Field: Yellow, Lavender and Pink on Violet197759 1/4 x 39 1/2 in.(150.5 cm) oil on canvas
Provenance
Private Collection
Private Collection, Greece, by descent from above
Along with Jackson Pollock, Barnett Newman, and Willem de Kooning, Theodoros Stamos was part of the first generation of Abstract Expressionists. Like Newman, Stamos explored the possibilities of color which he combined with studies of light and location.

This painting represents Stamos’s fascination with color, pushing both the surface and symbolic qualities in their placement and geometry. Within the canvas, one can see subtle influences of “primitive” or “mythological” shapes which pushes the viewer to consider their relation to both the painting in front of them and their place within a larger cosmos.

The work is part of his Lefkada series, named after a Greek island. It is a nod to both Stamos’s Greek heritage (his father came from Lefkada) and to where he spent half of the year each year after 1976. The Lefkada series speaks to the mythological aspects of the canvas, and the influence of location on his process.

Stamos was also an important teacher, having taught at the famed Black Mountain College where one of his students was Kenneth Noland
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