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ALFRED SISLEY (1839-1899)

 
Between Île-de-France and Burgundy and on the edge of the Fontainebleau Forest lies the medieval village of Moret-sur-Loing, established in the 12th century. When Alfred Sisley described its character to Monet in a letter dated 31 August 1881 as “a chocolate-box landscape…” he meant it as a memento of enticement; that its keep, the ramparts, the church, the fortified gates, and the ornate facades nestled along the river were, for a painter, a setting of unmatched charm. An ancient church, always the most striking townscape feature along the Seine Valley, would be a presence in Sisley’s townscape views as it was for Corot, and for Monet at Vétheuil. But unlike Monet whose thirty views of Rouen Cathedral were executed so he could trace the play of light and shadow across the cathedral façade and capture the ephemeral nature of moment-to-moment changes of light and atmosphere, Sisley set out to affirm the permanent nature of the church of Notre-Dame at Moret-sur-Loing.  Monet’s sole concern was air and light, and Sisley’s appears to be an homage keepsake. The painting exudes respect for the original architects and builders of a structure so impregnable and resolute, it stood then as it did in those medieval times, and which for us, stands today, as it will, for time immemorial.<br><br>Nevertheless, Sisley strived to show the changing appearance of the motif through a series of atmospheric changes. He gave the works titles such as “In Sunshine”, “Under Frost”, and “In Rain” and exhibited them as a group at the Salon du Champ-de-Mars in 1894, factors that suggest he thought of them as serial interpretations. Nevertheless, unlike Monet’s work, l’église de Moret, le Soir reveals that Sisley chose to display the motif within a spatial context that accentuates its compositional attributes — the plunging perspective of the narrow street at left, the strong diagonal recession of the building lines as a counterbalance to the right, and the imposing weight of the stony building above the line of sight. Between Île-de-France and Burgundy and on the edge of the Fontainebleau Forest lies the medieval village of Moret-sur-Loing, established in the 12th century. When Alfred Sisley described its character to Monet in a letter dated 31 August 1881 as “a chocolate-box landscape…” he meant it as a memento of enticement; that its keep, the ramparts, the church, the fortified gates, and the ornate facades nestled along the river were, for a painter, a setting of unmatched charm. An ancient church, always the most striking townscape feature along the Seine Valley, would be a presence in Sisley’s townscape views as it was for Corot, and for Monet at Vétheuil. But unlike Monet whose thirty views of Rouen Cathedral were executed so he could trace the play of light and shadow across the cathedral façade and capture the ephemeral nature of moment-to-moment changes of light and atmosphere, Sisley set out to affirm the permanent nature of the church of Notre-Dame at Moret-sur-Loing.  Monet’s sole concern was air and light, and Sisley’s appears to be an homage keepsake. The painting exudes respect for the original architects and builders of a structure so impregnable and resolute, it stood then as it did in those medieval times, and which for us, stands today, as it will, for time immemorial.<br><br>Nevertheless, Sisley strived to show the changing appearance of the motif through a series of atmospheric changes. He gave the works titles such as “In Sunshine”, “Under Frost”, and “In Rain” and exhibited them as a group at the Salon du Champ-de-Mars in 1894, factors that suggest he thought of them as serial interpretations. Nevertheless, unlike Monet’s work, l’église de Moret, le Soir reveals that Sisley chose to display the motif within a spatial context that accentuates its compositional attributes — the plunging perspective of the narrow street at left, the strong diagonal recession of the building lines as a counterbalance to the right, and the imposing weight of the stony building above the line of sight. Between Île-de-France and Burgundy and on the edge of the Fontainebleau Forest lies the medieval village of Moret-sur-Loing, established in the 12th century. When Alfred Sisley described its character to Monet in a letter dated 31 August 1881 as “a chocolate-box landscape…” he meant it as a memento of enticement; that its keep, the ramparts, the church, the fortified gates, and the ornate facades nestled along the river were, for a painter, a setting of unmatched charm. An ancient church, always the most striking townscape feature along the Seine Valley, would be a presence in Sisley’s townscape views as it was for Corot, and for Monet at Vétheuil. But unlike Monet whose thirty views of Rouen Cathedral were executed so he could trace the play of light and shadow across the cathedral façade and capture the ephemeral nature of moment-to-moment changes of light and atmosphere, Sisley set out to affirm the permanent nature of the church of Notre-Dame at Moret-sur-Loing.  Monet’s sole concern was air and light, and Sisley’s appears to be an homage keepsake. The painting exudes respect for the original architects and builders of a structure so impregnable and resolute, it stood then as it did in those medieval times, and which for us, stands today, as it will, for time immemorial.<br><br>Nevertheless, Sisley strived to show the changing appearance of the motif through a series of atmospheric changes. He gave the works titles such as “In Sunshine”, “Under Frost”, and “In Rain” and exhibited them as a group at the Salon du Champ-de-Mars in 1894, factors that suggest he thought of them as serial interpretations. Nevertheless, unlike Monet’s work, l’église de Moret, le Soir reveals that Sisley chose to display the motif within a spatial context that accentuates its compositional attributes — the plunging perspective of the narrow street at left, the strong diagonal recession of the building lines as a counterbalance to the right, and the imposing weight of the stony building above the line of sight. Between Île-de-France and Burgundy and on the edge of the Fontainebleau Forest lies the medieval village of Moret-sur-Loing, established in the 12th century. When Alfred Sisley described its character to Monet in a letter dated 31 August 1881 as “a chocolate-box landscape…” he meant it as a memento of enticement; that its keep, the ramparts, the church, the fortified gates, and the ornate facades nestled along the river were, for a painter, a setting of unmatched charm. An ancient church, always the most striking townscape feature along the Seine Valley, would be a presence in Sisley’s townscape views as it was for Corot, and for Monet at Vétheuil. But unlike Monet whose thirty views of Rouen Cathedral were executed so he could trace the play of light and shadow across the cathedral façade and capture the ephemeral nature of moment-to-moment changes of light and atmosphere, Sisley set out to affirm the permanent nature of the church of Notre-Dame at Moret-sur-Loing.  Monet’s sole concern was air and light, and Sisley’s appears to be an homage keepsake. The painting exudes respect for the original architects and builders of a structure so impregnable and resolute, it stood then as it did in those medieval times, and which for us, stands today, as it will, for time immemorial.<br><br>Nevertheless, Sisley strived to show the changing appearance of the motif through a series of atmospheric changes. He gave the works titles such as “In Sunshine”, “Under Frost”, and “In Rain” and exhibited them as a group at the Salon du Champ-de-Mars in 1894, factors that suggest he thought of them as serial interpretations. Nevertheless, unlike Monet’s work, l’église de Moret, le Soir reveals that Sisley chose to display the motif within a spatial context that accentuates its compositional attributes — the plunging perspective of the narrow street at left, the strong diagonal recession of the building lines as a counterbalance to the right, and the imposing weight of the stony building above the line of sight. Between Île-de-France and Burgundy and on the edge of the Fontainebleau Forest lies the medieval village of Moret-sur-Loing, established in the 12th century. When Alfred Sisley described its character to Monet in a letter dated 31 August 1881 as “a chocolate-box landscape…” he meant it as a memento of enticement; that its keep, the ramparts, the church, the fortified gates, and the ornate facades nestled along the river were, for a painter, a setting of unmatched charm. An ancient church, always the most striking townscape feature along the Seine Valley, would be a presence in Sisley’s townscape views as it was for Corot, and for Monet at Vétheuil. But unlike Monet whose thirty views of Rouen Cathedral were executed so he could trace the play of light and shadow across the cathedral façade and capture the ephemeral nature of moment-to-moment changes of light and atmosphere, Sisley set out to affirm the permanent nature of the church of Notre-Dame at Moret-sur-Loing.  Monet’s sole concern was air and light, and Sisley’s appears to be an homage keepsake. The painting exudes respect for the original architects and builders of a structure so impregnable and resolute, it stood then as it did in those medieval times, and which for us, stands today, as it will, for time immemorial.<br><br>Nevertheless, Sisley strived to show the changing appearance of the motif through a series of atmospheric changes. He gave the works titles such as “In Sunshine”, “Under Frost”, and “In Rain” and exhibited them as a group at the Salon du Champ-de-Mars in 1894, factors that suggest he thought of them as serial interpretations. Nevertheless, unlike Monet’s work, l’église de Moret, le Soir reveals that Sisley chose to display the motif within a spatial context that accentuates its compositional attributes — the plunging perspective of the narrow street at left, the strong diagonal recession of the building lines as a counterbalance to the right, and the imposing weight of the stony building above the line of sight. Between Île-de-France and Burgundy and on the edge of the Fontainebleau Forest lies the medieval village of Moret-sur-Loing, established in the 12th century. When Alfred Sisley described its character to Monet in a letter dated 31 August 1881 as “a chocolate-box landscape…” he meant it as a memento of enticement; that its keep, the ramparts, the church, the fortified gates, and the ornate facades nestled along the river were, for a painter, a setting of unmatched charm. An ancient church, always the most striking townscape feature along the Seine Valley, would be a presence in Sisley’s townscape views as it was for Corot, and for Monet at Vétheuil. But unlike Monet whose thirty views of Rouen Cathedral were executed so he could trace the play of light and shadow across the cathedral façade and capture the ephemeral nature of moment-to-moment changes of light and atmosphere, Sisley set out to affirm the permanent nature of the church of Notre-Dame at Moret-sur-Loing.  Monet’s sole concern was air and light, and Sisley’s appears to be an homage keepsake. The painting exudes respect for the original architects and builders of a structure so impregnable and resolute, it stood then as it did in those medieval times, and which for us, stands today, as it will, for time immemorial.<br><br>Nevertheless, Sisley strived to show the changing appearance of the motif through a series of atmospheric changes. He gave the works titles such as “In Sunshine”, “Under Frost”, and “In Rain” and exhibited them as a group at the Salon du Champ-de-Mars in 1894, factors that suggest he thought of them as serial interpretations. Nevertheless, unlike Monet’s work, l’église de Moret, le Soir reveals that Sisley chose to display the motif within a spatial context that accentuates its compositional attributes — the plunging perspective of the narrow street at left, the strong diagonal recession of the building lines as a counterbalance to the right, and the imposing weight of the stony building above the line of sight. Between Île-de-France and Burgundy and on the edge of the Fontainebleau Forest lies the medieval village of Moret-sur-Loing, established in the 12th century. When Alfred Sisley described its character to Monet in a letter dated 31 August 1881 as “a chocolate-box landscape…” he meant it as a memento of enticement; that its keep, the ramparts, the church, the fortified gates, and the ornate facades nestled along the river were, for a painter, a setting of unmatched charm. An ancient church, always the most striking townscape feature along the Seine Valley, would be a presence in Sisley’s townscape views as it was for Corot, and for Monet at Vétheuil. But unlike Monet whose thirty views of Rouen Cathedral were executed so he could trace the play of light and shadow across the cathedral façade and capture the ephemeral nature of moment-to-moment changes of light and atmosphere, Sisley set out to affirm the permanent nature of the church of Notre-Dame at Moret-sur-Loing.  Monet’s sole concern was air and light, and Sisley’s appears to be an homage keepsake. The painting exudes respect for the original architects and builders of a structure so impregnable and resolute, it stood then as it did in those medieval times, and which for us, stands today, as it will, for time immemorial.<br><br>Nevertheless, Sisley strived to show the changing appearance of the motif through a series of atmospheric changes. He gave the works titles such as “In Sunshine”, “Under Frost”, and “In Rain” and exhibited them as a group at the Salon du Champ-de-Mars in 1894, factors that suggest he thought of them as serial interpretations. Nevertheless, unlike Monet’s work, l’église de Moret, le Soir reveals that Sisley chose to display the motif within a spatial context that accentuates its compositional attributes — the plunging perspective of the narrow street at left, the strong diagonal recession of the building lines as a counterbalance to the right, and the imposing weight of the stony building above the line of sight. Between Île-de-France and Burgundy and on the edge of the Fontainebleau Forest lies the medieval village of Moret-sur-Loing, established in the 12th century. When Alfred Sisley described its character to Monet in a letter dated 31 August 1881 as “a chocolate-box landscape…” he meant it as a memento of enticement; that its keep, the ramparts, the church, the fortified gates, and the ornate facades nestled along the river were, for a painter, a setting of unmatched charm. An ancient church, always the most striking townscape feature along the Seine Valley, would be a presence in Sisley’s townscape views as it was for Corot, and for Monet at Vétheuil. But unlike Monet whose thirty views of Rouen Cathedral were executed so he could trace the play of light and shadow across the cathedral façade and capture the ephemeral nature of moment-to-moment changes of light and atmosphere, Sisley set out to affirm the permanent nature of the church of Notre-Dame at Moret-sur-Loing.  Monet’s sole concern was air and light, and Sisley’s appears to be an homage keepsake. The painting exudes respect for the original architects and builders of a structure so impregnable and resolute, it stood then as it did in those medieval times, and which for us, stands today, as it will, for time immemorial.<br><br>Nevertheless, Sisley strived to show the changing appearance of the motif through a series of atmospheric changes. He gave the works titles such as “In Sunshine”, “Under Frost”, and “In Rain” and exhibited them as a group at the Salon du Champ-de-Mars in 1894, factors that suggest he thought of them as serial interpretations. Nevertheless, unlike Monet’s work, l’église de Moret, le Soir reveals that Sisley chose to display the motif within a spatial context that accentuates its compositional attributes — the plunging perspective of the narrow street at left, the strong diagonal recession of the building lines as a counterbalance to the right, and the imposing weight of the stony building above the line of sight. Between Île-de-France and Burgundy and on the edge of the Fontainebleau Forest lies the medieval village of Moret-sur-Loing, established in the 12th century. When Alfred Sisley described its character to Monet in a letter dated 31 August 1881 as “a chocolate-box landscape…” he meant it as a memento of enticement; that its keep, the ramparts, the church, the fortified gates, and the ornate facades nestled along the river were, for a painter, a setting of unmatched charm. An ancient church, always the most striking townscape feature along the Seine Valley, would be a presence in Sisley’s townscape views as it was for Corot, and for Monet at Vétheuil. But unlike Monet whose thirty views of Rouen Cathedral were executed so he could trace the play of light and shadow across the cathedral façade and capture the ephemeral nature of moment-to-moment changes of light and atmosphere, Sisley set out to affirm the permanent nature of the church of Notre-Dame at Moret-sur-Loing.  Monet’s sole concern was air and light, and Sisley’s appears to be an homage keepsake. The painting exudes respect for the original architects and builders of a structure so impregnable and resolute, it stood then as it did in those medieval times, and which for us, stands today, as it will, for time immemorial.<br><br>Nevertheless, Sisley strived to show the changing appearance of the motif through a series of atmospheric changes. He gave the works titles such as “In Sunshine”, “Under Frost”, and “In Rain” and exhibited them as a group at the Salon du Champ-de-Mars in 1894, factors that suggest he thought of them as serial interpretations. Nevertheless, unlike Monet’s work, l’église de Moret, le Soir reveals that Sisley chose to display the motif within a spatial context that accentuates its compositional attributes — the plunging perspective of the narrow street at left, the strong diagonal recession of the building lines as a counterbalance to the right, and the imposing weight of the stony building above the line of sight. Between Île-de-France and Burgundy and on the edge of the Fontainebleau Forest lies the medieval village of Moret-sur-Loing, established in the 12th century. When Alfred Sisley described its character to Monet in a letter dated 31 August 1881 as “a chocolate-box landscape…” he meant it as a memento of enticement; that its keep, the ramparts, the church, the fortified gates, and the ornate facades nestled along the river were, for a painter, a setting of unmatched charm. An ancient church, always the most striking townscape feature along the Seine Valley, would be a presence in Sisley’s townscape views as it was for Corot, and for Monet at Vétheuil. But unlike Monet whose thirty views of Rouen Cathedral were executed so he could trace the play of light and shadow across the cathedral façade and capture the ephemeral nature of moment-to-moment changes of light and atmosphere, Sisley set out to affirm the permanent nature of the church of Notre-Dame at Moret-sur-Loing.  Monet’s sole concern was air and light, and Sisley’s appears to be an homage keepsake. The painting exudes respect for the original architects and builders of a structure so impregnable and resolute, it stood then as it did in those medieval times, and which for us, stands today, as it will, for time immemorial.<br><br>Nevertheless, Sisley strived to show the changing appearance of the motif through a series of atmospheric changes. He gave the works titles such as “In Sunshine”, “Under Frost”, and “In Rain” and exhibited them as a group at the Salon du Champ-de-Mars in 1894, factors that suggest he thought of them as serial interpretations. Nevertheless, unlike Monet’s work, l’église de Moret, le Soir reveals that Sisley chose to display the motif within a spatial context that accentuates its compositional attributes — the plunging perspective of the narrow street at left, the strong diagonal recession of the building lines as a counterbalance to the right, and the imposing weight of the stony building above the line of sight.
L'Église de Moret, le Soir189481,28 x 100,33 cm (31 1/4 x 39 1/2 po)(81,28 x 100,33 cm) huile sur toile
Provenance
Domaine Sisley
Vente : Vente de l'Atelier Sisley, Galeries Georges Petit Paris, 1er mai 1899, lot 13
George Viau, Paris
Vente : Hôtel Drouot Paris, 20 février 1908, lot 37
Collection Pearson, Paris (acquise lors de la vente ci-dessus)
Vente : Vente Pearson, Galerie Paul Cassirer Berlin, 18 octobre 1927, lot 65
Collection privée
Vente : Hôtel Drouot, Paris, 23 juin 1928, lot 98
Collection Aubert, Paris (acheté à la vente ci-dessus ; peut-être Marcel Aubert)
Collection privée Galerie Edward Nahem
S
...Plus.....teven Bedowitz, Boca Raton, Floride (acquis en 1989)
Collection particulière, New York
Larry Lacerte, Dallas (acquis en 1991)
Collection privée (acquise en 1996)
Exposition
Tokyo, Isetan Museum of Art ; Kagawa, Takamatsu Municipal Museum of Art ; Hiroshima, Museum of Art et Wakayama, Departmental Museum of Modern Art, Exposition Alfred Sisley, 2000, no. 53, illustré en couleur pp. 138-139
Littérature
O. Reuterswaerd, 'Sisley's Cathedrals, A Study of the Church at Moret' in Gazette des Beaux Arts, March 1952, fig. 1, illustré p. 194.
F. Daulte, Alfred Sisley. Catalogue raisonné de l'œuvre peint, Lausanne, 1959, n° 835, illustré en noir et blanc.
F. Daulte, Sisley. Les Saisons, Paris, 1992, no. 41, illustré en couleur p. 73
R. Shone, Sisley, New York, 1992, pl. 134, illustré en couleur p. 170 (mentionné pp. 164-165)
Brame, S., Sisley, A., Lorenceau, F., & Daulte, O. (2021). Alfred Sisley : Catalogue critique des peintures et des pastels. P. 347 ill. 347, 501
...MOINS.....
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"Je commence toujours un tableau par le ciel." - Alfred Sisley

Histoire

Entre l'Île-de-France et la Bourgogne et à l'orée de la forêt de Fontainebleau se trouve le village médiéval de Moret-sur-Loing, fondé auXIIe siècle. Lorsqu'Alfred Sisley en décrit le caractère à Monet, dans une lettre datée du 31 août 1881, comme "un paysage de boîte de chocolat...", il s'agit d'un souvenir séduisant ; son donjon, ses remparts, son église, ses portes fortifiées, ses façades ornées nichées le long de la rivière constituent, pour un peintre, un cadre au charme inégalé. L'église ancienne, qui est toujours l'élément le plus frappant du paysage urbain de la vallée de la Seine, sera présente dans les vues de Sisley, comme elle l'était pour Corot et pour Monet à Vétheuil. Mais contrairement à Monet, dont les trente vues de la cathédrale de Rouen ont été exécutées afin qu'il puisse retracer les jeux d'ombre et de lumière sur la façade de la cathédrale et capturer la nature éphémère des changements de lumière et d'atmosphère d'un instant à l'autre, Sisley a cherché à affirmer la nature permanente de l'église Notre-Dame de Moret-sur-Loing. La seule préoccupation de Monet était l'air et la lumière, et celle de Sisley apparaît comme un souvenir d'hommage. Le tableau respire le respect pour les architectes et les bâtisseurs originaux d'une structure si imprenable et si résolue qu'elle se dressait alors comme en ces temps médiévaux et qui, pour nous, se dresse aujourd'hui, comme elle le fera, pour des temps immémoriaux.

Néanmoins, Sisley s'est efforcé de montrer l'aspect changeant du motif à travers une série de changements atmosphériques. Il a donné à ses œuvres des titres tels que "Sous le soleil", "Sous le givre" et "Sous la pluie" et les a exposées en groupe au Salon du Champ-de-Mars en 1894, des éléments qui suggèrent qu'il les considérait comme des interprétations en série. Néanmoins, contrairement à l'œuvre de Monet, l'église de Moret, le Soir révèle que Sisley a choisi de présenter le motif dans un contexte spatial qui accentue ses attributs compositionnels - la perspective plongeante de la rue étroite à gauche, la forte récession diagonale des lignes de bâtiment comme contrepoids à droite, et le poids imposant du bâtiment en pierre au-dessus de la ligne de vue.

  • Sisley39199_histoire1
    Alfred Sisley
  • Sisley39199_histoire2
    Jean-Baptiste-Camile Corot, "Moret sur Loing, le pont et l'eglise", 1822, Collection privée
  • SIsley39199_histoire3
    Claude Monet, "Cathédrale de Rouen, Façade ouest", 1894, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
  • SIsley39199_histoire4
    Alfred Sisley, "Le Pont de Moret, effet d'orage", 1887, Musée Malraux, La Havre.
  • Sisley39199_histoire5
    Une carte postale de Moret sur Loing, l'église Norte-Dame
  • Sisley39199_histoire6
    Une carte postale de Moret sur Loing, La rue de l'Eglise
  • Sisley39199_histoire7
    Alfred Sisley, "L'église au soleil du soir", 1894, Musée des Beaux-Arts de Rouen, Rouen, France
  • Sisley39199_histoire8
    Eglise Notre Dame de Moret-sur-Loing, Seine et Marne
"Chaque tableau montre un endroit dont l'artiste est tombé amoureux." - Alfred Sisley

LES CONNAISSANCES DU MARCHÉ

  • Sisley39199_insights
  • Le prix record pour une peinture de Sisley aux enchères est de plus de 9 millions de dollars, établi en 2017 par un paysage d'hiver nettement plus petit que L'église de Moret, le Soir.
  • Il n' existe que 884 peintures à l'huile de Sisley, dont beaucoup se trouvent dans des collections permanentes de musées, ce qui laisse peu d'excellents exemples à grande échelle susceptibles d'être proposés à la vente privée.
  • L'église de Moret, le Soir est exceptionnellement grande par rapport aux autres œuvres de Sisley, et appartient à la même collection privée depuis 1996, ce qui ajoute à sa valeur.
  • Elle est signée en bas à droite "Sisley 94" et documentée dans le catalogue raisonné Sisley (F. Daulte, Lausanne, 1959, n° 835, illustré en noir et blanc).
  • Elle représente l'église Notre-Dame de Moret, un sujet important que Sisley a revisité une douzaine de fois depuis son installation à Moret en 1889.

Tableaux comparables vendus aux enchères

Huile sur toile, 21 1/4 x 25 3/8 in. Vendu chez Sotheby's Londres : 1er mars 2017.

"Effet de Neige à Louveciennes" (1874) a été vendu pour 9 064 733 dollars.

Huile sur toile, 21 1/4 x 25 3/8 in. Vendu chez Sotheby's Londres : 1er mars 2017.
  • Peinture plus petite avec une palette de couleurs sourdes, mais de belles ombres.
  • Une scène hivernale rare
  • Établir le prix record pour Sisley aux enchères en 2017
Huile sur toile, 20 1/8 x 25 3/4 in Vendu chez Sotheby's New York : 4 novembre 2014.

"Le loing à Moret" (1883) a été vendu pour 4 869 000 dollars.

Huile sur toile, 20 1/8 x 25 3/4 in Vendu chez Sotheby's New York : 4 novembre 2014.
  • Nettement plus petit que notre pièce
  • Moins de finition et pas de chiffres
  • Belle lumière et palette de couleurs
Huile sur toile, 25 5/8 x 36 1/8 in. Vendu à Sotheby's Londres : 5 février 2008.

"Moret-sur-Loing" (1891) pour 4 685 031 dollars.

Huile sur toile, 25 5/8 x 36 1/8 in. Vendu à Sotheby's Londres : 5 février 2008.
  • Les grandes peintures de Sisley comme celle-ci et la nôtre sont rares et plus précieuses.
  • Vendu il y a huit ans pour plus de 4,6 millions de dollars, et le marché s'est développé.
Huile sur toile, 28 7/8 x 36 5/8 in. Vendu à Sotheby's Londres : 5 février 2007.

"Le loing à Moret, en été" (1891) a été vendu pour 5 746 135 dollars.

Huile sur toile, 28 7/8 x 36 5/8 in. Vendu à Sotheby's Londres : 5 février 2007.
  • Une autre grande toile réalisée quelques années plus tôt
  • Comme notre tableau, il comprend une figure, ce qui en augmente la valeur.

Peintures dans les collections des musées

Musée des Beaux-Arts de Rouen

"L'église de Moret dans le soleil du matin" (1893), huile sur toile, 26 x 32 in.

Musée des arts, Winterthur, Suisse

"L'église dans le soleil du matin" (1893), huile sur toile, 39 3/8 x 33 1/4 in.

L'Institut des arts de Détroit

"L'église de Moret après la pluie" (1894), huile sur toile, 28 3/4 x 23 3/4 in.

Le Petit Palais, Paris

"L'église de Moret (soir)" (1894), huile sur toile, 39 3/4 x 32 1/4 in.

Galerie d'art Hunterian, Université de Glasgow

"L'église de Moret-sur-Loing, temps de pluie le matin" (1894), huile sur toile, 26 x 32 in.
"J'aime tous ces peintres qui aimaient et avaient un fort sentiment pour la nature". - Alfred Sisley

Galerie d'images

Peintures de cathédrales de Sisley et Monet

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Demande de renseignements - Art Single

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