Heather James Jackson Hole 3D Virtual Tour – Summer 2021

PUBLISHED IN: Exhibition Tours

We are excited to share the fantastic collection of artworks on view this summer at our gallery in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Located just off of the town square at 172 Center Street, our Wyoming gallery showcases blue-chip artworks from all genres including Frida Kahlo, Joan Miro, Alexander Calder, and Mary Corse. Discover the full collection in our 3D virtual tour.

CLAUDE MONET - L’Ancienne rue de la Chaussée, Argenteuil - oil on canvas - 18 1/4 x 25 7/8 in.

CLAUDE MONET

WILLEM DE KOONING - Woman in a Rowboat - oil on paper laid on masonite - 47 1/2 x 36 1/4 in.

WILLEM DE KOONING

FRIDA KAHLO - Hammer and Sickle (and unborn baby) - dry plaster and mixed media - 16 1/4 x 13 x 6 in.

FRIDA KAHLO

FRANCIS PICABIA - Lunis - oil on canvas - 25 1/2 x 20 1/2 in. .

FRANCIS PICABIA

JOAN MIRO - Oiseau, Insecte, Constellation - oil on canvas - 50 3/4 x 38 1/8 in.

JOAN MIRO

An exemplary work from Picasso’s Neo-Classical period, La communiante avec missel belongs to a rare series. Picasso revisited the theme of children receiving communion a few times and in a few styles, from this solemn classic version to the dynamic fragmentation of Cubism. A Neo-Classical example comparable to this piece is in the collection of the Musée Picasso in Paris.
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<br>While this time period after World War I saw many artists looking to tradition, a return to order as a reaction against the destruction of war, Picasso’s Neo-classicism was not so much a refuge, but a vehicle by which he could explore new themes and ideas. In La communiante avec missel, we see certain hallmarks of Picasso: the visual weight that the girl carries and the statuesque features of her face. These elements are softened by the curved lines the artist has used for her body and dress. In Picasso’s hands, the painting is a meditation of youth and religion marking the rites of passage.

PABLO PICASSO

CAMILLE PISSARRO - Le Quai de Pothuis a Pontoise - oil on canvas - 18 1/8 x 21 7/8 in.

CAMILLE PISSARRO

MAX PECHSTEIN - Damenbildnis (Charlotte Pechstein) - oil on canvas - 29 1/2 x 23 1/2 in.

MAX PECHSTEIN

Among the most desirable subjects in Moore's oeuvre are his Family Groups.  The theme was first explored in a 1922 stone sculpture and evolved into a public commission from the British government prior to World War II. After the war, the subject was revisited as the message of rebuilding strong families was critical to the British people's recovery.
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<br>"Family Group" (1945) documents the optimisim and hope of Post-War Europe in sculptural form. The young family depicted shows the rebirth of the British people after one of the darkest eras in human history.

HENRY MOORE

Larry Rivers is considered by many to be the father of the Pop Art movement.  In Rivers's 1980 work "Beyond Camel," we see a slightly out of focus Camel Cigarette pack, an item from consumer culture Rivers has appropriated to create a critique of commoditization and consumer culture. Rivers would have certainly been aware of the work of Stuart Davis and his 1921 painting, "Lucky Strike," depicting a flattened pack of cigarettes. Rivers interprets his subject with a Pop Art perspective; however, the imagery is almost larger than life, and the brand image is presented as a subject unto itself.  
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<br>In 2002, a retrospective of Rivers's work was held at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

LARRY RIVERS

Julian Schnabel is an American painter whose style is associated with the Neo-Expressionist movement of the 1980s. Pascin Pig Passin Time is part of Schnabel’s broken plate series of paintings, inspired by the trencadís, or broken tile mosaic, of architect Antoni Gaudí. With a humorous title and depicting his first wife, Jacqueline Beaurang, the broken ceramics give Schnabel an assertive and textural surface in which to create large-scale works that captured the brash and audacious period of the 1980s.

JULIAN SCHNABEL

FERNAND LEGER - Le Vase Bleu - oil on canvas - 15 x 18 in.

FERNAND LEGER

A major figure in both the Abstract Expressionist and American Figurative Expressionist movements of the 1940s and 1950s, Elaine de Kooning's prolific output defied singular categorization. Her versatile styles explored the spectrum of realism to abstraction, resulting in a career characterized by intense expression and artistic boundary-pushing. A striking example of de Kooning's explosive creativity is Untitled (Totem Pole), an extremely rare sculptural painting by the artist that showcases her command of color. 
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<br>She created this piece around 1960, the same period as her well-known bullfight paintings. She left New York in 1957 to begin teaching at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, and from there would visit Ciudad Juárez, where she observed the bullfights that inspired her work. An avid traveler, de Kooning drew inspiration from various sources, resulting in a diverse and experimental body of work.

ELAINE DE KOONING

DONALD ROLLER WILSON - The Clone, the Fuse, and Sister Dinah Might - oil on canvas - 64 x 87 in.

DONALD ROLLER WILSON

Elaine de Kooning was commissioned to paint JFK in 1962 for the Truman Library. The present work, "Study of John F. Kennedy" (1963), is one of several studies stemming from her work toward the official portrait. She spent several sessions with Kennedy in Palm Beach, creating many drawings and paintings to capture his likeness. The final portrait is now in the National Portrait Gallery at the Smithsonian.
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<br>This charcoal on canvas remained in the artist's collection until her passing in 1989. Although several smaller black and white studies exist, they are primarily bust-length and smaller in scale. This fully realized study captures the character of the JFK with a sense of dignity and immediacy.  
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<br>Illustrated in "Elaine de Kooning: Portraits," this monumental work would fit comfortably in a museum's permanent collection.

ELAINE DE KOONING

MARINO MARINI - Gioccolere - bronze with black and grey patina - 19 1/8 x 5 3/4 x 3 1/2 in.

MARINO MARINI

As a member of the legendary Gutai Art Association that flourished between 1954 and 1972, Sadamasa Motonaga emerged when post-atomic surrealist existentialism was at the forefront of artistic development in Japan. Yet he chose a different path. He turned his back on the destruction wrought by the war and created work that was fresh, jubilant, and playful. “Untitled” from 1969 is in his classic style, which developed concurrently with Morris Louis’ so-called ‘Veil’ paintings. It is a brilliantly successful display of Motonaga’s avant-garde take on traditional Japanese Tarashikomi — the technique that involves tilting the canvas at different angles to allow mixtures of resin and enamel to flow upon one another before the paint is fully dry.

SADAMASA MOTONAGA

ELAINE DE KOONING - Bill Brown - oil on canvas - 32 1/8 x 20 in.

ELAINE DE KOONING

As a member of the legendary Gutai Art Association that flourished between 1954 and 1972, Sadamasa Motonaga emerged when post-atomic surrealist existentialism was at the forefront of artistic development in Japan. Yet he chose a different path. He turned his back on the destruction wrought by the war and created work that was fresh, jubilant, and playful. “Untitled” of 1966 is in his classic style, which developed concurrently with Morris Louis’ so-called ‘Veil’ paintings. It might suggest the brightly lit comb, eye and mottled plumage of a gallinaceous bird, but any such associations are probably arbitrary and unintended. Instead, it is a brilliantly successful display of Motonaga’s avant-garde take on traditional Japanese Tarashikomi — the technique that involves tilting the canvas at different angles to allow mixtures of resin and enamel to flow upon one another before the paint is fully dry.

SADAMASA MOTONAGA

Civa is one of the principal deities of Hinduism. In this work, Chiparus represents the exoticism of the East, as the elegant figure meditates in the lotus position. The work recalls the dances of the Ballets Russes, one of the artist’s primary inspirations, and embodies the essence of the age — particularly the rediscovery of ancient Egyptian art, as Tutankhamun’s tomb was excavated in 1922. 
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<br>Chiparus depicted most of his figures in a sensual, curvilinear fashion. His subjects always look beautiful and at ease. Civa is an excellent example of the artist’s impeccable casting, particularly the detail work in the bronze body and the expressively carved ivory face. 
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<br>The decorative base is also noteworthy, because Chiparus made them integral to his compositions. The artist used an assortment of materials to decorate the bases of his sculptures, including onyxes, marbles, and colored stones.

DEMETRE CHIPARUS

ALEXANDER CALDER - Chicago - gouache and ink on paper - 29 1/2 x 43 in.

ALEXANDER CALDER

Born in Mexico City in 1918, Ricardo Martinez de Hoyos was the thirteenth of sixteen children. Among his siblings were other artists: Oliverio, a sculptor; Enrico and Homero, architects; and Jorge, who became a well-known actor. The first prestigious recognition of Martinez’s work as a painter came with the Raúl Beillers Prize in 1967, followed by the Moinho Santista Prize at the Sao Paulo Biennial in 1971. He went on to exhibit at important Mexican institutions such as the Museo de Arte Moderno and the Palacio de Bellas Artes, which held a major retrospective of Martinez’s work in 1994. After his death, the Museo de la Ciudad de México presented a Ricardo Martinez retrospective in 2012. 
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<br>“Mujer con Vasija” from 1976 exemplifies the artist’s distinctive style of figurative painting. The monumental figure fills the canvas, contoured by the dramatic contrast of light and color. Many of his paintings from this period center on volumetric figures in scenes of daily life, such as this woman with a vessel. This pieces shows vestiges of his earlier influences in the 1940s and ‘50s, stylized lines inspired by pre-Hispanic art combined with the unreal environments of surrealism.

RICARDO MARTINEZ

Pre-eminent surrealist Frida Kahlo created paintings and drawings that conjured up a vision of herself and of her world. Kahlo’s drawings are rare owing to the fact they were meant as gifts and mementos for friends, as this drawing of Diego Rivera was. Rivera was Kahlo’s husband and with whom she had a strong but explosive relationship. This portrait is a playful example of her thoughts on her husband. This drawing was included in the Detroit Institute of Art’s exhibition on the year Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera spent in the city and the drawing showcases Kahlo’s emerging voice as an artist.

FRIDA KAHLO

Mercedes Matter was an original member of the American Abstract Artists and an influential figure in the Abstract Expressionist movement. Alongside many of her fellow AbEx colleagues like Helen Frankenthaler and Lee Krasner, Matter studied under Hans Hoffman. The market for works by the historically undervalued AbEx women is increasing tremendously as their contributions to the movement gain overdue recognition. 
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<br>Matter held "Still Life" (c. 1962-63) in her private collection for nearly 40 years, a testament to its personal value, and the current owner acquired it directly from her estate. It is a wonderful example of Matter's expressive brushwork and distinctive blend of abstract and figurative styles. She used visual sources for her paintings, such as the traditional still life, but deconstructed the objects into complete abstraction, maintaining a focus on capturing the energy and relationship between objects and spaces.

MERCEDES MATTER

NATHAN OLIVEIRA - Figure with Blue Eyes - oil on canvas - 66 x 54 in.

NATHAN OLIVEIRA

One of the most prominent modernist artists, Roberto Matta created artworks brimming with color and surrealist forms. Born in Chile, Matta worked for two years in modern architect Le Corbusier’s studio in Paris. He also formed strong friendships with Salvador Dalí and Andre Breton, officially joining the surrealists in 1937.
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<br>This painting incorporates psychological responses to political and social concerns, hallmarks of Matta’s paintings influenced by the impact of World War II. The painting also contains his classic style of numerous, overlapping architectural planes. Matta deftly merges his surrealist background with the visual language of the Abstract Expressionists.

ROBERTO MATTA

ROBERTO MATTA - Untitled - oil on canvas - 34 3/8 x 42 1/2 in.

ROBERTO MATTA

NATHAN OLIVEIRA - Nude Stepping from the Carpet - oil on canvas - 52 x 48 in.

NATHAN OLIVEIRA

ROBERT BATEMAN - By the River - Elephants - acrylic on canvas - 48 x 72 in.

ROBERT BATEMAN

SE OK SUH - Untitled - ink wash on paper - 40 x 44 in.

SE OK SUH

JOSEPH KLEITSCH - Mission Cloisters, San Juan Capistrano - oil on canvas - 22 1/8 x 27 in.

JOSEPH KLEITSCH

"Bouquets de Fleurs" (1901) is a glowing Post-Impressionist still life. As the revolutionary wave of Impressionism receded from its apex, artists such as Henri Manguin, Henri Matisse, Kees van Dongen, Louis Valtat, and others emerged as part of the new avant-garde in Europe. These “Fauves,” or roughly translated “wild beasts,” would attack their canvases with a bold and vibrant new palette. This completely new way of painting was not initially celebrated by critics, or the artistic elite, but is today recognized among the most innovative and original artistic movements of the 20th Century.    
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<br>The present work, painted just before the revolution of Fauvism took hold, demonstrates a critical transitionary period in Modern Art. The subject is depicted with a masterful compositional sense and attention to spatial relationships. Manguin’s competency in composition would allow him to experiment freely with color during the first decade of the 20th Century. The slightly later but comparable Manguin still life “Flowers” (1915) is in the permanent collection of the Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia.

HENRI MANGUIN

Mercedes Matter was an original member of the American Abstract Artists and an influential figure in the Abstract Expressionist movement. Alongside many of her fellow AbEx colleagues like Helen Frankenthaler and Lee Krasner, Matter studied under Hans Hoffman. The market for works by the historically undervalued AbEx women is increasing tremendously as their contributions to the movement gain overdue recognition. 
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<br>Matter began creating large-scale charcoal on canvas works in the 1970s with the aim of approaching drawing with the same reverence as painting. The charcoal works are less common than her riotously colorful paintings, and they demonstrate Matter's proclivity for complex and dynamic compositions.

MERCEDES MATTER

IRVING NORMAN - Chairman of the Board - oil on canvas - 90 x 48 in.

IRVING NORMAN

TADASUKE (Tadasky) KUWAYAMA - B-139 - acrylic on canvas - 47 x 47 in.

TADASUKE (Tadasky) KUWAYAMA

ANDY WARHOL - Self-Portrait in Fright Wig - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

Dutch painter and sculptor Karel Appel was an influential founding member of the international avant-garde movement CoBrA active from 1948-1951. The collective, named for the initials of the members’ home cities Copenhagen, Brussels, and Amsterdam, rejected both traditional naturalism and abstraction devoid of expression. Drawing inspiration from the freedom of color, line, and form found in children’s art, Appel and his contemporaries sought to embrace spontaneity and experimentation. “Personage” from 1975 exemplifies the artist’s expressionist paint handling, thick impasto, and brilliant color.

KAREL APPEL

ANDY WARHOL - Mao - screenprint in colors - 36 x 36 in.

ANDY WARHOL

THEODOROS STAMOS - Olympia Sun-Box - acrylic on canvas - 60 1/4 x 48 in.

THEODOROS STAMOS

The essential and dramatic declaration “Let there be light” of Genesis is not so far removed from Mary Corse’s recollection of the moment in 1968 when the late afternoon sun electrified the reflective road markings of Malibu as she drove east. In an instant, the glowing asphalt markings provided the oracle she needed to realize she could ‘put light in the painting and not just make a picture of light’.  Using the same glass microbeads utilized by road maintenance services, she layers and embeds the prismatic material in bands and geometric configurations creating nuanced glimmering abstract fields which shift as the viewer moves in relationship to the work. Move to one side and dimness brightens to light. Walk back and forth and you might feel a rippling effect from its shimmering, prismatic effects.
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<br>A photographic image of a Mary Corse microsphere painting is not only a dull representation, but it also misses the point – it is experience dependent art that requires participation to ‘be’.  Of course, “Untitled” (1975) defies that one-point static perspective and instead, depends upon a real time, interactive art experience which heightens awareness of the body in space as the viewer experiences shifts of retinal stimulation, sensation and feeling. It is a rare bird.  Unusually petite at two-foot square, its design, geometry and color belie her earlier revelation that led to a devotion to her usual reductive palette. Instead, it is a bold statement in sequined color, its center field bounded at the corners by a sparkling red stepped motif that separates it from its starry night sky corner spandrels. It may not include a star motif, but it has the glamour and presence that belongs along Hollywood’s Walk of Fame.

MARY CORSE

ANDY WARHOL - Self-Portrait - Polaroid - 4 1/4 x 4 1/2 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Farrah Fawcett - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

HENRY MOORE - Emperor's Heads - bronze with brown patina - 6 3/4 x 8 1/4 x 4 1/2 in.

HENRY MOORE

ROBERTO MATTA - L'epreuve - oil on canvas - 29 1/2 x 25 1/2 in.

ROBERTO MATTA

ANDY WARHOL - Self Portrait in Drag - unique Polacolor ER print - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

JAE KON PARK - Untitled - oil on canvas - 44 1/8 x 57 1/4 in.

JAE KON PARK

DONALD SULTAN - Yellow Tulip #18 - oil and tar on paper - 20 x 20 in.

DONALD SULTAN

ANDY WARHOL - The Shadow (from Myths) - color screenprint with diamond dust on paper - 37 1/2 x 37 1/2 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Self-Portrait - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/2 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Self Portrait - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Vote McGovern - screenprint - 42 x 42 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Self Portrait at 'Flowers' Exhibition - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

FIONA RAE - Untitled (yellow, red + brown) - oil on canvas - 72 x 78 in.

FIONA RAE

ANDY WARHOL - Warhol with Corn Flakes - Polaroid, Polacolor - 3 3/8 x 4 1/2 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Arnold Schwarzenegger - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Self-Portrait - Polaroid, Polacolor - 3 3/8 x 4 1/2 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Dennis Hopper - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

DENNIS OPPENHEIM - Launching Station #1 - color pencil and pigment on paper - 76 x 50 in.

DENNIS OPPENHEIM

MERION ESTES - Solo Samba - acrylic on canvas - 70 1/4 x 71 1/2 in.

MERION ESTES

ANDY WARHOL - David Hockney and Andy Warhol - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

MARC CHAGALL - Le Cirque M.505 - lithograph - 16 3/4 x 12 3/4 in.

MARC CHAGALL

ANDY WARHOL - Georgia O'Keeffe - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/2 x 3 1/2 in.

ANDY WARHOL

HERB ALPERT - Eagle Falls - bronze - 41 1/2 x 10 x 10 in.

HERB ALPERT

HERB ALPERT - Three Feathers - bronze - 38 x 20 x 9 in.

HERB ALPERT

ANDY WARHOL - Woman in a Pink Hat - ink and tempera on paper - 10 5/8 x 8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Jane Fonda - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Jane Fonda - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Man Ray - Polaroid Polacolor Type 108 print - 4 1/4 x 3 1/2 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Keith Haring - silver gelatin print - 10 x 8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - OJ Simpson - Polaroid, Polacolor - 3 3/8 x 4 1/4 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Jon Gould and Andy Warhol - silver gelatin print - 8 x 10 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Ryan O'Neal - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

RUFINO TAMAYO - Dos Hermanos - mixografia - 40 1/2 x 34 in.

RUFINO TAMAYO

ANDY WARHOL - Gun - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Knives - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Japanese Toy (Panda with Drum) - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Farrah Fawcett Photo Shoot - silver gelatin print - 8 x 10 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Cheryl Tiegs - Polaroid - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Dental Molds - Polaroid, Polacolor - 3 3/8 x 4 1/4 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Robert Rauschenberg - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

PENELOPE GOTTLIEB - Rosa Rugosa - acrylic and ink over Audubon print - 38 x 26 in.

PENELOPE GOTTLIEB

PENELOPE GOTTLIEB - Tupha latifolia - acrylic and ink over Audubon print - 37 x 25 in.

PENELOPE GOTTLIEB

ELIOT PORTER - Coyote Gulch, Escalante River, Glen Canyon, Utah - dye-transfer print - 15 3/4 x 12 1/4 in.

ELIOT PORTER

Invasive plant found in WY

PENELOPE GOTTLIEB

PENELOPE GOTTLIEB - Cattleya schilleriana (EW) - acrylic over aluminum - 24 x 20 in.

PENELOPE GOTTLIEB

PENELOPE GOTTLIEB - Cypripedium anethinum (VU) - acrylic over aluminum - 24 x 20 in.

PENELOPE GOTTLIEB

PENELOPE GOTTLIEB - Cyrtopodium punctatum (EN) - acrylic over aluminum - 24 x 20 in.

PENELOPE GOTTLIEB

PENELOPE GOTTLIEB - Elaeagnus Umbellata - digital print on Epson Archival 100% cotton - 37 1/2 x 24 3/4 in.

PENELOPE GOTTLIEB