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GEORGIA O'KEEFFE (1887-1986)

 
Cottonwood Tree (Near Abiquiu), New Mexico (1943) by celebrated American artist Georgia O’Keeffe is exemplary of the airier, more naturalistic style that the desert inspired in her. O’Keeffe had great affinity for the distinctive beauty of the Southwest, and made her home there among the spindly trees, dramatic vistas, and bleached animal skulls that she so frequently painted. O’Keeffe took up residence at Ghost Ranch, a dude ranch twelve miles outside of the village of Abiquiú in northern New Mexico and painted this cottonwood tree around there. The softer style befitting this subject is a departure from her bold architectural landscapes and jewel-toned flowers.<br><br>The cottonwood tree is abstracted into soft patches of verdant greens through which more delineated branches are seen, spiraling in space against pockets of blue sky. The modeling of the trunk and delicate energy in the leaves carry forward past experimentations with the regional trees of the Northeast that had captivated O’Keeffe years earlier: maples, chestnuts, cedars, and poplars, among others. Two dramatic canvases from 1924, Autumn Trees, The Maple and The Chestnut Grey, are early instances of lyrical and resolute centrality, respectively. As seen in these early tree paintings, O’Keeffe exaggerated the sensibility of her subject with color and form.<br><br>In her 1974 book, O’Keeffe explained: “The meaning of a word— to me— is not as exact as the meaning of a color. Color and shapes make a more definite statement than words.” Her exacting, expressive color intrigued. The Precisionist painter Charles Demuth described how, in O’Keeffe’s work, “each color almost regains the fun it must have felt within itself on forming the first rainbow” (As quoted in C. Eldridge, Georgia O’Keeffe, New York, 1991, p. 33). As well, congruities between forms knit together her oeuvre. Subjects like hills and petals undulate alike, while antlers, trees, and tributaries correspond in their branching morphology.<br><br>The sinewy contours and gradated hues characteristic of O’Keeffe find an incredible range across decades of her tree paintings. In New Mexico, O’Keeffe returned to the cottonwood motif many times, and the seasonality of this desert tree inspired many forms. The vernal thrill of new growth was channeled into spiraling compositions like Spring Tree No.1 (1945). Then, cottonwood trees turned a vivid autumnal yellow provided a breathtaking compliment to the blue backdrop of Mount Pedernal. The ossified curves of Dead Cottonweed Tree (1943) contain dramatic pools of light and dark, providing a foil to the warm, breathing quality of this painting, Cottonwood Tree (Near Abiquiu). The aural quality of this feathered cottonwood compels a feeling guided by O’Keeffe’s use of form of color. Cottonwood Tree (Near Abiquiu), New Mexico (1943) by celebrated American artist Georgia O’Keeffe is exemplary of the airier, more naturalistic style that the desert inspired in her. O’Keeffe had great affinity for the distinctive beauty of the Southwest, and made her home there among the spindly trees, dramatic vistas, and bleached animal skulls that she so frequently painted. O’Keeffe took up residence at Ghost Ranch, a dude ranch twelve miles outside of the village of Abiquiú in northern New Mexico and painted this cottonwood tree around there. The softer style befitting this subject is a departure from her bold architectural landscapes and jewel-toned flowers.<br><br>The cottonwood tree is abstracted into soft patches of verdant greens through which more delineated branches are seen, spiraling in space against pockets of blue sky. The modeling of the trunk and delicate energy in the leaves carry forward past experimentations with the regional trees of the Northeast that had captivated O’Keeffe years earlier: maples, chestnuts, cedars, and poplars, among others. Two dramatic canvases from 1924, Autumn Trees, The Maple and The Chestnut Grey, are early instances of lyrical and resolute centrality, respectively. As seen in these early tree paintings, O’Keeffe exaggerated the sensibility of her subject with color and form.<br><br>In her 1974 book, O’Keeffe explained: “The meaning of a word— to me— is not as exact as the meaning of a color. Color and shapes make a more definite statement than words.” Her exacting, expressive color intrigued. The Precisionist painter Charles Demuth described how, in O’Keeffe’s work, “each color almost regains the fun it must have felt within itself on forming the first rainbow” (As quoted in C. Eldridge, Georgia O’Keeffe, New York, 1991, p. 33). As well, congruities between forms knit together her oeuvre. Subjects like hills and petals undulate alike, while antlers, trees, and tributaries correspond in their branching morphology.<br><br>The sinewy contours and gradated hues characteristic of O’Keeffe find an incredible range across decades of her tree paintings. In New Mexico, O’Keeffe returned to the cottonwood motif many times, and the seasonality of this desert tree inspired many forms. The vernal thrill of new growth was channeled into spiraling compositions like Spring Tree No.1 (1945). Then, cottonwood trees turned a vivid autumnal yellow provided a breathtaking compliment to the blue backdrop of Mount Pedernal. The ossified curves of Dead Cottonweed Tree (1943) contain dramatic pools of light and dark, providing a foil to the warm, breathing quality of this painting, Cottonwood Tree (Near Abiquiu). The aural quality of this feathered cottonwood compels a feeling guided by O’Keeffe’s use of form of color. Cottonwood Tree (Near Abiquiu), New Mexico (1943) by celebrated American artist Georgia O’Keeffe is exemplary of the airier, more naturalistic style that the desert inspired in her. O’Keeffe had great affinity for the distinctive beauty of the Southwest, and made her home there among the spindly trees, dramatic vistas, and bleached animal skulls that she so frequently painted. O’Keeffe took up residence at Ghost Ranch, a dude ranch twelve miles outside of the village of Abiquiú in northern New Mexico and painted this cottonwood tree around there. The softer style befitting this subject is a departure from her bold architectural landscapes and jewel-toned flowers.<br><br>The cottonwood tree is abstracted into soft patches of verdant greens through which more delineated branches are seen, spiraling in space against pockets of blue sky. The modeling of the trunk and delicate energy in the leaves carry forward past experimentations with the regional trees of the Northeast that had captivated O’Keeffe years earlier: maples, chestnuts, cedars, and poplars, among others. Two dramatic canvases from 1924, Autumn Trees, The Maple and The Chestnut Grey, are early instances of lyrical and resolute centrality, respectively. As seen in these early tree paintings, O’Keeffe exaggerated the sensibility of her subject with color and form.<br><br>In her 1974 book, O’Keeffe explained: “The meaning of a word— to me— is not as exact as the meaning of a color. Color and shapes make a more definite statement than words.” Her exacting, expressive color intrigued. The Precisionist painter Charles Demuth described how, in O’Keeffe’s work, “each color almost regains the fun it must have felt within itself on forming the first rainbow” (As quoted in C. Eldridge, Georgia O’Keeffe, New York, 1991, p. 33). As well, congruities between forms knit together her oeuvre. Subjects like hills and petals undulate alike, while antlers, trees, and tributaries correspond in their branching morphology.<br><br>The sinewy contours and gradated hues characteristic of O’Keeffe find an incredible range across decades of her tree paintings. In New Mexico, O’Keeffe returned to the cottonwood motif many times, and the seasonality of this desert tree inspired many forms. The vernal thrill of new growth was channeled into spiraling compositions like Spring Tree No.1 (1945). Then, cottonwood trees turned a vivid autumnal yellow provided a breathtaking compliment to the blue backdrop of Mount Pedernal. The ossified curves of Dead Cottonweed Tree (1943) contain dramatic pools of light and dark, providing a foil to the warm, breathing quality of this painting, Cottonwood Tree (Near Abiquiu). The aural quality of this feathered cottonwood compels a feeling guided by O’Keeffe’s use of form of color. Cottonwood Tree (Near Abiquiu), New Mexico (1943) by celebrated American artist Georgia O’Keeffe is exemplary of the airier, more naturalistic style that the desert inspired in her. O’Keeffe had great affinity for the distinctive beauty of the Southwest, and made her home there among the spindly trees, dramatic vistas, and bleached animal skulls that she so frequently painted. O’Keeffe took up residence at Ghost Ranch, a dude ranch twelve miles outside of the village of Abiquiú in northern New Mexico and painted this cottonwood tree around there. The softer style befitting this subject is a departure from her bold architectural landscapes and jewel-toned flowers.<br><br>The cottonwood tree is abstracted into soft patches of verdant greens through which more delineated branches are seen, spiraling in space against pockets of blue sky. The modeling of the trunk and delicate energy in the leaves carry forward past experimentations with the regional trees of the Northeast that had captivated O’Keeffe years earlier: maples, chestnuts, cedars, and poplars, among others. Two dramatic canvases from 1924, Autumn Trees, The Maple and The Chestnut Grey, are early instances of lyrical and resolute centrality, respectively. As seen in these early tree paintings, O’Keeffe exaggerated the sensibility of her subject with color and form.<br><br>In her 1974 book, O’Keeffe explained: “The meaning of a word— to me— is not as exact as the meaning of a color. Color and shapes make a more definite statement than words.” Her exacting, expressive color intrigued. The Precisionist painter Charles Demuth described how, in O’Keeffe’s work, “each color almost regains the fun it must have felt within itself on forming the first rainbow” (As quoted in C. Eldridge, Georgia O’Keeffe, New York, 1991, p. 33). As well, congruities between forms knit together her oeuvre. Subjects like hills and petals undulate alike, while antlers, trees, and tributaries correspond in their branching morphology.<br><br>The sinewy contours and gradated hues characteristic of O’Keeffe find an incredible range across decades of her tree paintings. In New Mexico, O’Keeffe returned to the cottonwood motif many times, and the seasonality of this desert tree inspired many forms. The vernal thrill of new growth was channeled into spiraling compositions like Spring Tree No.1 (1945). Then, cottonwood trees turned a vivid autumnal yellow provided a breathtaking compliment to the blue backdrop of Mount Pedernal. The ossified curves of Dead Cottonweed Tree (1943) contain dramatic pools of light and dark, providing a foil to the warm, breathing quality of this painting, Cottonwood Tree (Near Abiquiu). The aural quality of this feathered cottonwood compels a feeling guided by O’Keeffe’s use of form of color. Cottonwood Tree (Near Abiquiu), New Mexico (1943) by celebrated American artist Georgia O’Keeffe is exemplary of the airier, more naturalistic style that the desert inspired in her. O’Keeffe had great affinity for the distinctive beauty of the Southwest, and made her home there among the spindly trees, dramatic vistas, and bleached animal skulls that she so frequently painted. O’Keeffe took up residence at Ghost Ranch, a dude ranch twelve miles outside of the village of Abiquiú in northern New Mexico and painted this cottonwood tree around there. The softer style befitting this subject is a departure from her bold architectural landscapes and jewel-toned flowers.<br><br>The cottonwood tree is abstracted into soft patches of verdant greens through which more delineated branches are seen, spiraling in space against pockets of blue sky. The modeling of the trunk and delicate energy in the leaves carry forward past experimentations with the regional trees of the Northeast that had captivated O’Keeffe years earlier: maples, chestnuts, cedars, and poplars, among others. Two dramatic canvases from 1924, Autumn Trees, The Maple and The Chestnut Grey, are early instances of lyrical and resolute centrality, respectively. As seen in these early tree paintings, O’Keeffe exaggerated the sensibility of her subject with color and form.<br><br>In her 1974 book, O’Keeffe explained: “The meaning of a word— to me— is not as exact as the meaning of a color. Color and shapes make a more definite statement than words.” Her exacting, expressive color intrigued. The Precisionist painter Charles Demuth described how, in O’Keeffe’s work, “each color almost regains the fun it must have felt within itself on forming the first rainbow” (As quoted in C. Eldridge, Georgia O’Keeffe, New York, 1991, p. 33). As well, congruities between forms knit together her oeuvre. Subjects like hills and petals undulate alike, while antlers, trees, and tributaries correspond in their branching morphology.<br><br>The sinewy contours and gradated hues characteristic of O’Keeffe find an incredible range across decades of her tree paintings. In New Mexico, O’Keeffe returned to the cottonwood motif many times, and the seasonality of this desert tree inspired many forms. The vernal thrill of new growth was channeled into spiraling compositions like Spring Tree No.1 (1945). Then, cottonwood trees turned a vivid autumnal yellow provided a breathtaking compliment to the blue backdrop of Mount Pedernal. The ossified curves of Dead Cottonweed Tree (1943) contain dramatic pools of light and dark, providing a foil to the warm, breathing quality of this painting, Cottonwood Tree (Near Abiquiu). The aural quality of this feathered cottonwood compels a feeling guided by O’Keeffe’s use of form of color. Cottonwood Tree (Near Abiquiu), New Mexico (1943) by celebrated American artist Georgia O’Keeffe is exemplary of the airier, more naturalistic style that the desert inspired in her. O’Keeffe had great affinity for the distinctive beauty of the Southwest, and made her home there among the spindly trees, dramatic vistas, and bleached animal skulls that she so frequently painted. O’Keeffe took up residence at Ghost Ranch, a dude ranch twelve miles outside of the village of Abiquiú in northern New Mexico and painted this cottonwood tree around there. The softer style befitting this subject is a departure from her bold architectural landscapes and jewel-toned flowers.<br><br>The cottonwood tree is abstracted into soft patches of verdant greens through which more delineated branches are seen, spiraling in space against pockets of blue sky. The modeling of the trunk and delicate energy in the leaves carry forward past experimentations with the regional trees of the Northeast that had captivated O’Keeffe years earlier: maples, chestnuts, cedars, and poplars, among others. Two dramatic canvases from 1924, Autumn Trees, The Maple and The Chestnut Grey, are early instances of lyrical and resolute centrality, respectively. As seen in these early tree paintings, O’Keeffe exaggerated the sensibility of her subject with color and form.<br><br>In her 1974 book, O’Keeffe explained: “The meaning of a word— to me— is not as exact as the meaning of a color. Color and shapes make a more definite statement than words.” Her exacting, expressive color intrigued. The Precisionist painter Charles Demuth described how, in O’Keeffe’s work, “each color almost regains the fun it must have felt within itself on forming the first rainbow” (As quoted in C. Eldridge, Georgia O’Keeffe, New York, 1991, p. 33). As well, congruities between forms knit together her oeuvre. Subjects like hills and petals undulate alike, while antlers, trees, and tributaries correspond in their branching morphology.<br><br>The sinewy contours and gradated hues characteristic of O’Keeffe find an incredible range across decades of her tree paintings. In New Mexico, O’Keeffe returned to the cottonwood motif many times, and the seasonality of this desert tree inspired many forms. The vernal thrill of new growth was channeled into spiraling compositions like Spring Tree No.1 (1945). Then, cottonwood trees turned a vivid autumnal yellow provided a breathtaking compliment to the blue backdrop of Mount Pedernal. The ossified curves of Dead Cottonweed Tree (1943) contain dramatic pools of light and dark, providing a foil to the warm, breathing quality of this painting, Cottonwood Tree (Near Abiquiu). The aural quality of this feathered cottonwood compels a feeling guided by O’Keeffe’s use of form of color. Cottonwood Tree (Near Abiquiu), New Mexico (1943) by celebrated American artist Georgia O’Keeffe is exemplary of the airier, more naturalistic style that the desert inspired in her. O’Keeffe had great affinity for the distinctive beauty of the Southwest, and made her home there among the spindly trees, dramatic vistas, and bleached animal skulls that she so frequently painted. O’Keeffe took up residence at Ghost Ranch, a dude ranch twelve miles outside of the village of Abiquiú in northern New Mexico and painted this cottonwood tree around there. The softer style befitting this subject is a departure from her bold architectural landscapes and jewel-toned flowers.<br><br>The cottonwood tree is abstracted into soft patches of verdant greens through which more delineated branches are seen, spiraling in space against pockets of blue sky. The modeling of the trunk and delicate energy in the leaves carry forward past experimentations with the regional trees of the Northeast that had captivated O’Keeffe years earlier: maples, chestnuts, cedars, and poplars, among others. Two dramatic canvases from 1924, Autumn Trees, The Maple and The Chestnut Grey, are early instances of lyrical and resolute centrality, respectively. As seen in these early tree paintings, O’Keeffe exaggerated the sensibility of her subject with color and form.<br><br>In her 1974 book, O’Keeffe explained: “The meaning of a word— to me— is not as exact as the meaning of a color. Color and shapes make a more definite statement than words.” Her exacting, expressive color intrigued. The Precisionist painter Charles Demuth described how, in O’Keeffe’s work, “each color almost regains the fun it must have felt within itself on forming the first rainbow” (As quoted in C. Eldridge, Georgia O’Keeffe, New York, 1991, p. 33). As well, congruities between forms knit together her oeuvre. Subjects like hills and petals undulate alike, while antlers, trees, and tributaries correspond in their branching morphology.<br><br>The sinewy contours and gradated hues characteristic of O’Keeffe find an incredible range across decades of her tree paintings. In New Mexico, O’Keeffe returned to the cottonwood motif many times, and the seasonality of this desert tree inspired many forms. The vernal thrill of new growth was channeled into spiraling compositions like Spring Tree No.1 (1945). Then, cottonwood trees turned a vivid autumnal yellow provided a breathtaking compliment to the blue backdrop of Mount Pedernal. The ossified curves of Dead Cottonweed Tree (1943) contain dramatic pools of light and dark, providing a foil to the warm, breathing quality of this painting, Cottonwood Tree (Near Abiquiu). The aural quality of this feathered cottonwood compels a feeling guided by O’Keeffe’s use of form of color. Cottonwood Tree (Near Abiquiu), New Mexico (1943) by celebrated American artist Georgia O’Keeffe is exemplary of the airier, more naturalistic style that the desert inspired in her. O’Keeffe had great affinity for the distinctive beauty of the Southwest, and made her home there among the spindly trees, dramatic vistas, and bleached animal skulls that she so frequently painted. O’Keeffe took up residence at Ghost Ranch, a dude ranch twelve miles outside of the village of Abiquiú in northern New Mexico and painted this cottonwood tree around there. The softer style befitting this subject is a departure from her bold architectural landscapes and jewel-toned flowers.<br><br>The cottonwood tree is abstracted into soft patches of verdant greens through which more delineated branches are seen, spiraling in space against pockets of blue sky. The modeling of the trunk and delicate energy in the leaves carry forward past experimentations with the regional trees of the Northeast that had captivated O’Keeffe years earlier: maples, chestnuts, cedars, and poplars, among others. Two dramatic canvases from 1924, Autumn Trees, The Maple and The Chestnut Grey, are early instances of lyrical and resolute centrality, respectively. As seen in these early tree paintings, O’Keeffe exaggerated the sensibility of her subject with color and form.<br><br>In her 1974 book, O’Keeffe explained: “The meaning of a word— to me— is not as exact as the meaning of a color. Color and shapes make a more definite statement than words.” Her exacting, expressive color intrigued. The Precisionist painter Charles Demuth described how, in O’Keeffe’s work, “each color almost regains the fun it must have felt within itself on forming the first rainbow” (As quoted in C. Eldridge, Georgia O’Keeffe, New York, 1991, p. 33). As well, congruities between forms knit together her oeuvre. Subjects like hills and petals undulate alike, while antlers, trees, and tributaries correspond in their branching morphology.<br><br>The sinewy contours and gradated hues characteristic of O’Keeffe find an incredible range across decades of her tree paintings. In New Mexico, O’Keeffe returned to the cottonwood motif many times, and the seasonality of this desert tree inspired many forms. The vernal thrill of new growth was channeled into spiraling compositions like Spring Tree No.1 (1945). Then, cottonwood trees turned a vivid autumnal yellow provided a breathtaking compliment to the blue backdrop of Mount Pedernal. The ossified curves of Dead Cottonweed Tree (1943) contain dramatic pools of light and dark, providing a foil to the warm, breathing quality of this painting, Cottonwood Tree (Near Abiquiu). The aural quality of this feathered cottonwood compels a feeling guided by O’Keeffe’s use of form of color. Cottonwood Tree (Near Abiquiu), New Mexico (1943) by celebrated American artist Georgia O’Keeffe is exemplary of the airier, more naturalistic style that the desert inspired in her. O’Keeffe had great affinity for the distinctive beauty of the Southwest, and made her home there among the spindly trees, dramatic vistas, and bleached animal skulls that she so frequently painted. O’Keeffe took up residence at Ghost Ranch, a dude ranch twelve miles outside of the village of Abiquiú in northern New Mexico and painted this cottonwood tree around there. The softer style befitting this subject is a departure from her bold architectural landscapes and jewel-toned flowers.<br><br>The cottonwood tree is abstracted into soft patches of verdant greens through which more delineated branches are seen, spiraling in space against pockets of blue sky. The modeling of the trunk and delicate energy in the leaves carry forward past experimentations with the regional trees of the Northeast that had captivated O’Keeffe years earlier: maples, chestnuts, cedars, and poplars, among others. Two dramatic canvases from 1924, Autumn Trees, The Maple and The Chestnut Grey, are early instances of lyrical and resolute centrality, respectively. As seen in these early tree paintings, O’Keeffe exaggerated the sensibility of her subject with color and form.<br><br>In her 1974 book, O’Keeffe explained: “The meaning of a word— to me— is not as exact as the meaning of a color. Color and shapes make a more definite statement than words.” Her exacting, expressive color intrigued. The Precisionist painter Charles Demuth described how, in O’Keeffe’s work, “each color almost regains the fun it must have felt within itself on forming the first rainbow” (As quoted in C. Eldridge, Georgia O’Keeffe, New York, 1991, p. 33). As well, congruities between forms knit together her oeuvre. Subjects like hills and petals undulate alike, while antlers, trees, and tributaries correspond in their branching morphology.<br><br>The sinewy contours and gradated hues characteristic of O’Keeffe find an incredible range across decades of her tree paintings. In New Mexico, O’Keeffe returned to the cottonwood motif many times, and the seasonality of this desert tree inspired many forms. The vernal thrill of new growth was channeled into spiraling compositions like Spring Tree No.1 (1945). Then, cottonwood trees turned a vivid autumnal yellow provided a breathtaking compliment to the blue backdrop of Mount Pedernal. The ossified curves of Dead Cottonweed Tree (1943) contain dramatic pools of light and dark, providing a foil to the warm, breathing quality of this painting, Cottonwood Tree (Near Abiquiu). The aural quality of this feathered cottonwood compels a feeling guided by O’Keeffe’s use of form of color. Cottonwood Tree (Near Abiquiu), New Mexico (1943) by celebrated American artist Georgia O’Keeffe is exemplary of the airier, more naturalistic style that the desert inspired in her. O’Keeffe had great affinity for the distinctive beauty of the Southwest, and made her home there among the spindly trees, dramatic vistas, and bleached animal skulls that she so frequently painted. O’Keeffe took up residence at Ghost Ranch, a dude ranch twelve miles outside of the village of Abiquiú in northern New Mexico and painted this cottonwood tree around there. The softer style befitting this subject is a departure from her bold architectural landscapes and jewel-toned flowers.<br><br>The cottonwood tree is abstracted into soft patches of verdant greens through which more delineated branches are seen, spiraling in space against pockets of blue sky. The modeling of the trunk and delicate energy in the leaves carry forward past experimentations with the regional trees of the Northeast that had captivated O’Keeffe years earlier: maples, chestnuts, cedars, and poplars, among others. Two dramatic canvases from 1924, Autumn Trees, The Maple and The Chestnut Grey, are early instances of lyrical and resolute centrality, respectively. As seen in these early tree paintings, O’Keeffe exaggerated the sensibility of her subject with color and form.<br><br>In her 1974 book, O’Keeffe explained: “The meaning of a word— to me— is not as exact as the meaning of a color. Color and shapes make a more definite statement than words.” Her exacting, expressive color intrigued. The Precisionist painter Charles Demuth described how, in O’Keeffe’s work, “each color almost regains the fun it must have felt within itself on forming the first rainbow” (As quoted in C. Eldridge, Georgia O’Keeffe, New York, 1991, p. 33). As well, congruities between forms knit together her oeuvre. Subjects like hills and petals undulate alike, while antlers, trees, and tributaries correspond in their branching morphology.<br><br>The sinewy contours and gradated hues characteristic of O’Keeffe find an incredible range across decades of her tree paintings. In New Mexico, O’Keeffe returned to the cottonwood motif many times, and the seasonality of this desert tree inspired many forms. The vernal thrill of new growth was channeled into spiraling compositions like Spring Tree No.1 (1945). Then, cottonwood trees turned a vivid autumnal yellow provided a breathtaking compliment to the blue backdrop of Mount Pedernal. The ossified curves of Dead Cottonweed Tree (1943) contain dramatic pools of light and dark, providing a foil to the warm, breathing quality of this painting, Cottonwood Tree (Near Abiquiu). The aural quality of this feathered cottonwood compels a feeling guided by O’Keeffe’s use of form of color.
Cottonwood Tree (in der Nähe von Abiquiu), New Mexico194336 x 30 in.(91,44 x 76,2 cm) Öl auf Leinwand
Provenienz
Ein amerikanischer Ort, New York
Mr. und Mrs. Max Ascoli, New York, 1944
Abstammung in der Familie
Harold Diamond, New York, ca. 1975
Galerie Gerald Peters, Santa Fe, New Mexico
Elaine Horwich Galerie, Scottsdale, Arizona, 1978
Sammlung von Mr. und Mrs. E. Parry Thomas, Las Vegas, Nevada, 1978
Privatsammlung, Vereinigte Staaten
Ausstellung
New York, New York, An American Place, Georgia O'Keeffe, Gemälde - 1943, 11. Januar - 11. März 1944, Nr. 8
West Palm Beach, Florida, Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens, Discoveri
...Mehr.....ng-Kreativität: American Art Masters, 10. Januar - 17. März 2024
Literaturhinweise
Lynes, Barbara Buhler, Georgia O'Keeffe, Catalogue Raisonné Volume Two (New Haven und London: Yale University Press, 1999), Kat. Nr. 1066, S. 670.
...WENIGER.....
Fragen Sie

"Ich fand heraus, dass ich mit Farben und Formen Dinge ausdrücken konnte, die ich auf andere Weise nicht ausdrücken konnte - Dinge, für die ich keine Worte hatte." -Georgia O'Keeffe

Geschichte

Cottonwood Tree (Near Abiquiu), New Mexico (1943) der berühmten amerikanischen Künstlerin Georgia O'Keeffe ist ein Beispiel für den luftigeren, naturalistischen Stil, den die Wüste bei ihr inspirierte. O'Keeffe hatte eine große Vorliebe für die unverwechselbare Schönheit des Südwestens und ließ sich dort inmitten der spindeldürren Bäume, dramatischen Ausblicke und gebleichten Tierschädel nieder, die sie so häufig malte. O'Keeffe ließ sich auf der Ghost Ranch nieder, einer Touristenranch zwölf Meilen außerhalb des Dorfes Abiquiú im Norden New Mexicos, und malte dort diesen Pappelbaum. Der weiche Stil, der zu diesem Motiv passt, ist eine Abkehr von ihren kühnen architektonischen Landschaften und juwelenfarbenen Blumen.

Die Pappel wird in weiche Flecken grünen Grüns abstrahiert, durch die sich die Äste besser abgrenzen lassen, die sich spiralförmig im Raum vor dem blauen Himmel bewegen. Die Modellierung des Stammes und die zarte Energie der Blätter knüpfen an frühere Experimente mit den regionalen Bäumen des Nordostens an, die O'Keeffe schon Jahre zuvor fasziniert hatten: Ahorne, Kastanien, Zedern und Pappeln, um nur einige zu nennen. Zwei dramatische Gemälde aus dem Jahr 1924, Autumn Trees, The Maple und The Chestnut Grey, sind frühe Beispiele für eine lyrische bzw. entschlossene Zentralität. Wie in diesen frühen Baumbildern zu sehen ist, übertrieb O'Keeffe die Sensibilität ihres Motivs mit Farbe und Form.

Mehr
  • Georgia O'Keeffe malt ein ähnliches Motiv auf der Ghost Ranch, New Mexico

    Georgia O'Keeffe malt ein ähnliches Motiv auf der Ghost Ranch, New Mexico

    Fotografie von Ansel Adams
  • Georgia O'Keeffe, 1953, an ihrem Schreibtisch in ihrem Atelier in Abiquiu mit einem ihrer kleineren Pappelholzbilder

    Georgia O'Keeffe, 1953, an ihrem Schreibtisch in ihrem Atelier in Abiquiu mit einem ihrer kleineren Pappelholzbilder

    Fotografiert von Laura Gilpin
  • "Toter Baumwollbaum" (1943)

    "Toter Baumwollbaum" (1943)

    Kunstmuseum Santa Barbara
  • "Herbstbäume, der Ahorn" (1924)

    "Herbstbäume, der Ahorn" (1924)

  • "Das Kastaniengrau" (1924)

    "Das Kastaniengrau" (1924)

"Ein Hügel oder ein Baum kann kein gutes Bild ergeben, nur weil es ein Hügel oder ein Baum ist. Es sind Linien und Farben, die so zusammengesetzt sind, dass sie etwas aussagen. Das ist für mich die eigentliche Grundlage der Malerei. Die Abstraktion ist oft die eindeutigste Form für das Ungreifbare in mir, das ich nur in der Farbe verdeutlichen kann." -Georgia O'Keeffe

MARKTEINBLICKE

  • O'Keeffe AMR-Grafik
  • Preisindex O'Keeffe
  • Die Grafik von Art Market Research zeigt, dass die Gemälde von O'Keeffe seit 1976 eine jährliche Rendite von 11,6 % erzielt haben.

  • Seit dem rekordverdächtigen Verkauf im Jahr 2014(Jimson Weed/White Flower No. 1, verkauft für über 44,4 Millionen Dollar) hat der Markt für Georgia O'Keeffe eine ständig steigende Nachfrage nach Ölgemälden im Stil ihrer Signatur verzeichnet.  

  • Selbst als O'Keeffes Markt während der Pandemie im Jahr 2020 einen leichten Rückgang verzeichnete (wie in der AMR-Grafik zu sehen), zeigt der globale Index der Auktionsumsätze von ArtPrice, dass O'Keeffe in diesem Jahr von Platz 263 auf Platz 63 der meistverkauften Künstler aufstieg, was veranschaulicht, dass O'Keeffes Gemälde nach wie vor gefragt sind, vor allem im Vergleich zur Leistung anderer Künstler in dieser Zeit.

Spitzenergebnisse bei Auktionen

Öl auf Leinwand, 48 x 40 cm. Verkauft bei Sotheby's New York: 20. November 2014.

"Stechapfel/ Weiße Blume Nr. 1" (1932) wurde für 44.405.000 $ verkauft.

Öl auf Leinwand, 48 x 40 cm. Verkauft bei Sotheby's New York: 20. November 2014.
Öl auf Leinwand, 36 x 30 Zoll. Verkauft bei Christie's New York: 9. November 2022.

"Weiße Rose mit Rittersporn Nr. I" (1927) wurde für 26.725.000 $ verkauft.

Öl auf Leinwand, 36 x 30 Zoll. Verkauft bei Christie's New York: 9. November 2022.
Öl auf Leinwand, 32 x 21 Zoll. Verkauft bei Christie's New York: 9. November 2022.

"Autumn Leaf II" (1927) wurde für 15.275.000 $ verkauft.

Öl auf Leinwand, 32 x 21 Zoll. Verkauft bei Christie's New York: 9. November 2022.
Öl auf Leinwand, 48 x 30 cm. Verkauft bei Sotheby's New York: 14. November 2018.

"A Street" (1926) wurde für 13.285.500 Dollar verkauft.

Öl auf Leinwand, 48 x 30 cm. Verkauft bei Sotheby's New York: 14. November 2018.

Vergleichbare Gemälde bei einer Auktion verkauft

Öl auf Leinwand, 20 x 30 cm. Verkauft bei Christie's New York: 9. November 2022.

"Red Hills with Pedernal, White Clouds" (1936) wurde für 12.298.000 $ verkauft.

Öl auf Leinwand, 20 x 30 cm. Verkauft bei Christie's New York: 9. November 2022.
  • Dieses Gemälde, das eine größere Ansicht der Wüstenlandschaft zeigt, wurde bei der Versteigerung der Sammlung des Microsoft-Mitbegründers Paul Allen verkauft. 
  • Die Natur war oft das Thema von O'Keeffes Kunst, und einige Pappeln sind in der Ferne dieser Landschaft zu sehen.
Öl auf Leinwand, 25 1/2 x 21 Zoll. Verkauft bei Sotheby's New York: 14. Mai 2018.

"Lake George With White Birch" (1921) wurde für 11.292.000 Dollar verkauft.

Öl auf Leinwand, 25 1/2 x 21 Zoll. Verkauft bei Sotheby's New York: 14. Mai 2018.
  • Diese frühe Leinwand mit ähnlichem Thema, wenn auch in kleinerem Maßstab, wurde 2018 für über 11,2 Millionen Dollar verkauft, der dritthöchste Auktionspreis für O'Keeffe
  • Naturmotive, insbesondere Bäume, waren ein häufiges Thema von O'Keeffe
Öl auf Leinwand, 16 x 36 cm. Verkauft bei Christie's New York: 09. Mai 2018.

"In der Nähe von Abiquiu, New Mexico" (1931) wurde für 8.412.500 Dollar verkauft.

Öl auf Leinwand, 16 x 36 cm. Verkauft bei Christie's New York: 09. Mai 2018.
  • Ein kleineres Werk als Cottonwood Tree (bei Abiquiu), New Mexico
  • Eine frühere Landschaft aus der gleichen Gegend in New Mexico, die 2018 für über 8,4 Millionen Dollar verkauft wurde.
Öl auf Leinwand, 36 x 30 cm. Verkauft bei Christie's New York: 20. November 2018.

"The Red Maple at Lake George" (1926) wurde für 8.187.500 Dollar verkauft.

Öl auf Leinwand, 36 x 30 cm. Verkauft bei Christie's New York: 20. November 2018.
  • Dieses Naturmotiv von O'Keeffe in derselben Größe wurde 2018 für über 8,18 Millionen Dollar verkauft.
  • Älteres Beispiel aus dem Jahr 1926
Öl auf Leinwand, 10,1 x 24 Zoll. Verkauft bei Sotheby's New York: 5. März 2020.

"Nature Forms - Gaspé" (1931) wurde für 6.870.200 $ verkauft.

Öl auf Leinwand, 10,1 x 24 Zoll. Verkauft bei Sotheby's New York: 5. März 2020.
  • Kleinformatiges, abstraktes Naturmotiv
  • Kürzlich für über $6,87 Millionen verkauft

SCARCITY

  • O'Keeffe Knappheit
  • 43 % der Gemälde von O'Keeffe befinden sich bereits in Museumssammlungen.

  • Von den 716 Ölgemälden auf Leinwand, die O'Keeffe malte, sind weniger als 300 in Privatsammlungen zu finden.

  • Im Laufe der Zeit werden viele der O'Keeffe-Gemälde, die sich derzeit in Privatsammlungen befinden, an Museen vererbt, so dass nur sehr wenige jemals verfügbar sein werden.

  • O'Keeffe malte die Cottonwood-Bäume in Abiquiu zunächst nur zwei Jahre lang, von 1943 bis 1945, und schuf nur eine kleine Handvoll Bilder für diese zentrale Serie. Viele Werke aus dieser Cottonwood Tree-Serie befinden sich heute in Museen wie dem Butler Institute of American Art und dem Brooklyn Museum.

Gemälde von Cottonwoods, Bäumen und Abiquiu in Museumssammlungen

Georgia O'Keeffe Museum, Santa Fe

"Cottonwood Tree in Spring" (1943) Öl auf Leinwand, 30 1/16 x 36 1/8 Zoll.

Kunstmuseum Santa Barbara

"Toter Cottonwood-Baum" (1943), Öl auf Leinwand, 36 x 30 cm.

Georgia O'Keeffe Museum, Santa Fe

"Ohne Titel (Cottonwood Tree)" (1945) Öl auf Karton, 24 1/4 x 20 Zoll.

Das Butler-Institut für amerikanische Kunst, Ohio

"Cottonwood III" (1944), Öl auf Leinwand, 20 x 30 cm.

Georgia O'Keeffe Museum, Santa Fe

"Cottonwood und Pedernal" (1948) Öl auf Leinwand, 10 x 12 Zoll.

Das Kunstmuseum von Cleveland

"Toter Baum mit rosa Hügel" (1945), Öl auf Leinwand, 30 x 40 cm.

Dallas Museum of Art

"Kahle Baumstämme mit Schnee" (1946), Öl auf Leinwand, 29 1/2 x 39 1/2 Zoll.

New Mexico Museum für Kunst, Santa Fe

"Frühlingsbaum Nr. 1" (1945), Öl auf Leinwand

Museum der Schönen Künste, Boston

"Abiquiu Trees VII" (1953), Öl auf Leinwand, 10 1/8 x 12 1/8 Zoll.

Brooklyn Museum, New York

"Dunkle Baumstämme" (1946), Öl auf Leinwand, 40 x 30 cm.

Das Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

"Near Abiquiu, New Mexico" (1930), Öl auf Leinwand, 10 in. × 24 1/8 Zoll.

Whitney Museum für amerikanische Kunst, New York

"Der Berg, New Mexico" (1931), Öl auf Leinwand, 30 1/16 × 36 1/8 Zoll.

Georgia O'Keeffe Museum, Santa Fe

"Ohne Titel (Landschaft von New Mexico)" (um 1943) Öl auf Leinwand, 13 x 33 1/8 Zoll.

Das Kunstmuseum von Cleveland

"Cliffs Beyond Abiquiu, Dry Waterfall" (1943), Öl auf Leinwand, 30 x 16 Zoll.

Kunstinstitut Chicago

"Abiquiu Sand Hills and Mesa" (1945), Öl auf Leinwand, 16 x 36 Zoll.
"Einen Raum auf schöne Weise zu füllen - das ist es, was Kunst für mich bedeutet". -Georgia O'Keeffe

Bild-Galerie

Zusätzliche Ressourcen

Machen Sie eine Videotour durch O'Keeffes Haus in Abiquiu, New Mexico, präsentiert vom Georgia O'Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe
Sehen Sie sich den Film "Houses of My Own" des Georgia O'Keeffe Museums an, um mehr über die inspirierende Landschaft von Abiquiu und ihre Pappeln zu erfahren.
Entdecken Sie mehr von O'Keeffes Cottonwood-Serien in der Sammlung des Georgia O'Keeffe Museums
Der leitende Kurator des HJFA, Chip Tom, spricht über O'Keeffes Cottonwood-Serie

Authentifizierung

Cottonwood Tree (Near Abiquiu), New Mexico, 1943 ist als Nummer 1066 in Barbara Buhler Lynes' Werkverzeichnis der Kunstwerke von Georgia O'Keeffe aufgeführt. Das Gemälde ist auf Seite 670 des zweiten Bandes abgebildet.

Siehe Raisonné-Katalog

Fragen Sie

Anfordern - Kunst Einzel

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