Jackson Hole 3D Virtual Gallery – August 2019

PUBLISHED IN: Exhibition Tours
The Wildenstein Catalogue Raisonné of Monet paintings offers a note on this painting: “During his second stay in Pourville-Varengeville, Monet painted the customs’ officer’s cottage several times and from various angles. This general view shows it overhanging the Gorge du petit Ailly." Monet spent six months in this part of Normandy in 1882, and the cabin in this painting was one of his favorite motifs to revisit. It appears in eighteen paintings from that year, and another dozen from a later trip to the area in 1897. His fixation with this house on the hill later became a habit of working serially – each canvas a singularity registering a unique guise yet set sequentially and in direct relationship to other works within the series. Monet circumambulated and painted the cabin from so many angles that as a group, the paintings are not as clearly recognizable as a series as the celebrated grain-stacks, Rouen cathedral, or poplar series. Still, it is a fixed and iconic element that reappears in many of Monet’s paintings from this period.
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<br>Japanese woodblock prints were a life-long source of inspiration for Monet, and this piece in particular draws upon Hiroshige's "Utsu Mountain, Okabe," c. 1833. This print is part of a series called “The Fifty-three Stations of the Tōkaidō,” which documented scenic views from the major road that linked the shōgun’s capital, Edo, to the imperial one Kyōto. Monet amassed an extensive collection of woodblock prints – many of which are still on view at Giverny.

CLAUDE MONET

"The Great White Throne, Zion" from 1901 is a luminous canvas from one of the most important painters of the American landscape. Thomas Moran depicted his landscape subjects with a majestic and sublime quality, and he drew inspiration from travels throughout the American West. This painting presents the expansive monolith at Zion National Park in southwestern Utah. The sheer power of nature and the immensity of natural world emerge in Moran's compositions.
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<br>Moran was a member of the "Hudson River School," a group of painters responsible for reinventing the concept of landscape painting, in which observation within nature became the central element to creating a painting.
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<br>This painting has been in the same private collection for over 40 years.

THOMAS MORAN

"Femme debout et vue de face agrafant son corset" (1883) is an intimate scene of a dancer dressing that has remained in the same private collection for 13 years. 
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<br>Here Degas experiments with Intimism, a cross current in 19th-century art where personal domestic scenes and interiors were depicted with intimate attention to the mood and feeling of the scene. The commanding, vertical composition accommodates a brilliant application of pigment on the right side of the canvas, where Degas experiments with atmospheric perspective. The gradations of color and light become as important as the figure for Degas -- perhaps he is paying homage to the "Nabis" circle, including Éduard Vuillard and Pierre Bonnard. 
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<br>Comparable quality Degas works are rare in the marketplace. The majority of monumental canvases have been acquired by prominent institutions worldwide, including the National Gallery in London, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, and Musée d'Orsay in Paris, among many others.

EDGAR DEGAS

"The Busy Bee" (1875), demonstrates Homer's influential excellence in watercolor. He began working in the medium in 1873, painting scenes of children and the daily lives of everyday people. Homer's prolific work in watercolor helped to establish it as a serious artistic medium.
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<br>This piece is from the reconstruction era and depicts a single figure. The boy depicted in "The Busy Bee" is a model that appears repeatedly in Homer's work from this period, including some of the most widely celebrated reconstruction era paintings like "Dressing for the Carnival" (1877) at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Nearly all Homer’s works from of the reconstruction era south are in museum collections. Another painting of the same model, "Taking Sunflower to Teacher" (1875), is in the Georgia Museum of Art.
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<br>This work is available from a private collection where it has stayed for the last 25 years. It has been exhibited widely beginning in 1876 at the National Academy of Design in New York and going on to be exhibited throughout the 20th century at major American museums such as The Metropolitan Museum in New York, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and The Amon Carter Museum of American Art in Fort Worth, Texas.

WINSLOW HOMER

This early Matisse portrait, “Nu accoudé,” was created at a time when Synthetic Cubism was prominent, yet Matisse remains true to his more representational depiction of his subject. Influenced by approaches to visual art in North Africa and the Middle East, Matisse brought European art a fresh new aesthetic. The odalisque, or more generally the female figure, features prominently in the work of Matisse: drawings, prints, and paintings all depict the nude as well as partially clothed figures.    
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<br>Drawing was the foundation for Matisse’s paintings. In the present work, you can see compositional attention that developed through the close study of his subject -- and the artist’s keen powers of observation and understanding of the sitter. “Nu accoudé” has an illustrious exhibition history and provenance. In addition to being owned by Galerie Bernheim-Jeune, the work was featured in a 1955 exhibition at the San Francisco Museum of Art.
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<br>Upon Matisse’s death in 1954 Pablo Picasso said, “When Matisse died, he left me his odalisques as a legacy.”

HENRI MATISSE

One of the most celebrated artists of the American West, Charles Russell deeply appreciated Native American culture with particular focus on the Northern Plains Indians. He spent the summer of 1888 living near the camps of the Blackfeet, Piegan, and Blood Indians in Canada, which would inspire his work for decades to come. One of the first "Western" artists to live the majority of his life actually in the West, Russell lived in Montana from the age of 16. 
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<br>Russell achieved great popularity during his lifetime for his emotionally charged depictions of the people and places he observed. This direct familiar observation added a depth to his work that was groundbreaking and affecting. Russell would work on the preliminary studies for his paintings in nature, out in the wild. 
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<br>“Cascade Buffalo Hunt” has remained in a private collection for nearly 50 years.

CHARLES RUSSELL

Shortly after his major retrospective exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1941, Salvador Dalí parlayed the idea of accumulated, or “flowering,” eyes into a grand oil and tempera painting for the set of his 1944 ballet Mad Tristan. In this painting from the same year," Les Yeux Fleuris," Dalí depicts three rows of four eyes with long lashes and a tear dropping on a brick wall backdrop. Eyes appear in Dalí paintings, sculpture, and jewelry throughout his career — as late as the 1981 painting Argus and, most notably, in paintings Dalí made for the dream sequences of the film Spellbound directed by Alfred Hitchcock.

SALVADOR DALI

Tom Wesselmann’s supercharged colors mirror popular advertising while the lounging female forms allude to Western art history’s classic figurative motif. A wonderful example of this synthesis is the 1997 painting 1962 Plus 35 Nude Sketch II. Here, the reclining woman’s eyes are barely visible beneath the surface of the paint, yet her lips are a bold red with a thick black outline. The hyper-sexualized presentation of the female body seems to address the consumer culture of Post War America – the commoditization of the flesh. Wesselmann’s dazzling paintings bring together elements of art historical tradition and 1960s imagination, creating a singular style.

TOM WESSELMANN

"The Ash Blonde" (1918) has remained in the same private collection for nearly 30 years. A superb portraitist, Childe Hassam expertly captures the emotion and character of his subject in the present work. The sitter's facial expression is depicted with an accuracy and nuanced attention to detail that is reminiscent of the Dutch Old Masters, specifically Rembrandt. Painted just one year after his seminal masterpiece in the White House collection, "The Avenue in the Rain" (1917), this portrait is a brilliant counterpoint to the artist's cityscapes.  
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<br>Hassam is represented in numerous museum collections, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, The National Gallery in Washington, D.C., The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and The Brooklyn Museum.

CHILDE HASSAM

A leading figure in the Young British Artists movement in the late 1980s and 1990s, Damien Hirst garnered international attention with his striking displays with death as a central theme. The most recognizable examples include “The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living” (1991), a 14-foot-long glass tank with a shark preserved in formaldehyde, “Mother and Child Divided” (1993), an installation that featured a bisected cow and her calf displayed in four vitrines at that year’s Venice Biennale, and “For the Love of God” (2007), a diamond-encrusted human skull made of platinum. 
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<br>Some of Hirst’s most iconic images include Spot paintings, consisting of organized rows of colored circles, and Butterfly paintings, such as “Overwhelming Love” (2008). Hirst’s Butterfly paintings speak to his characteristic themes, offering the contradiction of death with the bright vitality of a butterfly's wings. Hirst explains: “I think rather than be personal you have to find universal triggers: everyone’s frightened of glass, everyone’s frightened of sharks, everyone loves butterflies.”
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<br>Damien Hirst Butterfly works feature prominently in his oeuvre, he started to incorporate them after flies, and other insects were accidentally affixed to some of his paintings. Hirst's record for paintings at auction is held by the butterfly painting "Eternity" which sold for $9.6 million in 2007.

DAMIEN HIRST

"Lions on the Dreyfus Fund, Inc." demonstrates Rivers's Pop Art aesthetic through its repetition of imagery and a well-known corporate brand of the time. The lion forms featured prominently in the painting were a logo for the Dreyfus fund, as well as art historical symbols in their own right. Rivers would have at least seen pictures of the ancient archetypes for such imagery as the "Ishtar Gate" from 575 B.C. in what is now the country of Iraq. Rivers's love of travel and exploration brought him to Africa for seven months, where he would have been able to study a diverse menagerie for his artwork firsthand.    
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<br>Another version of the painting, "Lions on the Dreyfus Fund III" (1964) is in the permanent collection of the Art Institute of Chicago.

LARRY RIVERS

Gabriel Orozco is one of the preeminent artists working today. A native Mexican, Orozco gained initial recognition in the 1990s through his artistic creations across a wide range of media, including sculpture, drawing, photography, and installation works. Orozco had a significant mid-career traveling retrospective that ended in 2011 at the Tate Modern. He is widely regarded as one of the most innovative artists of our time.
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<br>“Samurai Tree - Invariant Gold 2” (2005) is part of the “Samurai Tree” series, the genesis of which was an exploration into the geometry of the circle in drawings Orozco produced on graph paper before 2004.  
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<br>“I thought that by establishing some rules, I could build up a structure that behaves like a sculpture,” says the artist, “so it’s a flat mobile maybe, or it’s a diagram that’s rotating and moving. And behaving not like a painting, in a way.”

GABRIEL OROZCO

WOJCIECH FANGOR - Red Moons 2 - oil on canvas - 71 x 26 in.

WOJCIECH FANGOR

Richard Prince is one of the most influential names in contemporary art. Prince is part of The Pictures Generation, a loosely associated group of artists who appropriated mass media imagery to examine and question issues of stereotypes, cultural tropes, and the constructed narrative of images. Prince and The Pictures Generation helped to usher in post-modernism in art.
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<br>In the late 1970s, Richard Prince began taking photographs of photographs, appropriation art in line with the readymades of Marcel Duchamp. "Untitled (Portrait)(Boy)" was included in the sensational 2014 Gagosian exhibition, New Portraits. For this series, Prince himself commented on each of the Instagram images and appropriated them for this body of work, creating a precise snapshot of our time. This work and series ask us to question the meaning within the proliferation of “selfies” and how people use these images to create and to project a narrative of themselves. It also challenges ideas of authorship, both constructing and deconstructing the nature of images while capturing a sense of immediacy within the apparatus of social media.

RICHARD PRINCE

“Angus” (c. 2000) is a cast bronze work that showcases Deborah Butterfield’s dedication to depicting the horse in the third dimension. This piece has had only one owner, a friend of the artist.
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<br>Butterfield's choice of material, often natural or industrial, is central to the effect of her work. Her driftwood pieces such as this one are some of her most highly celebrated for their graceful compositions of seemingly fragile and worn materials set with the permanence and solidity of bronze. She has spoken of her chosen subject matter as a sort of self-portrait, drawing parallels between the character of the horse, its connection to its natural environment, and the varied expressions of serenity and power within the human experience. Butterfield was born the same day as the 75th Kentucky Derby and partly credits this for her desire to feature horses so prominently in her work. 
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<br>The compact size of the work is a stark contrast to the other large examples, some of which are wall sculptures. Comparable quality Butterfield sculptures are featured in prominent museum collections, including The New Orleans Museum of Art, The Modern in Fort Worth, and Purdue University collections, among others.

DEBORAH BUTTERFIELD

Peaks of St. Gervais is one of the artist’s classic landscapes, with his distinctive swift brushstroke and charming town and structures — half of which he rendered in the shade — dwarfed by the snow-capped mountain. In most of his paintings, Payne used structures and figures not as subject, but to communicate the dramatic scale of mountain landscape. Drawn to the mountains of Europe, Payne trekked and painted the Swiss Alps, the colorful harbors of Brittany and France, and the sailing vessels in Italy.

EDGAR ALWIN PAYNE

WOJCIECH FANGOR - Green Points - oil on canvas - 52 7/8 x 33 1/2 in.

WOJCIECH FANGOR

Mel Ramos is best known for his paintings of superheroes and female nudes juxtaposed with pop culture imagery. Ramos’s Peek-A-Boo portfolio is a well-known series by the artist, positioning the viewer to observe the pin-up girl figures through a keyhole shape surrounded by black. The series is noted for the confident and direct gazes of its subjects as well as the commentary it provides on the sexualization of a traditional art historical motif: the nude female figure. Alongside fellow Pop artists like Andy Warhol, James Rosenquist, and friend Roy Lichtenstein, Ramos provided a visual language for audiences to understand and experience the proliferation of commercial images that exploded in post-war America.

MEL RAMOS

Stanton Macdonald-Wright was a co-founder of the Synchromism movement, which combined abstraction and intense color. He was influenced by ideas that the qualities of color were connected to the qualities of music. He stopped painting this way in the 1920s, but his work experienced a revitalization in the 1950s, following a retrospective of his work at LACMA. Inspired by the renewed interest, Wright began producing works with increased passion; these works were considered Neo-Synchromism. La Gaîté is a phenomenal example of this period in Wright’s career, showcasing the brighter colors and larger canvases he favored during his personal renaissance.

STANTON MACDONALD-WRIGHT

WILLIAM MORRIS - Fallow Deer Situla - blown glass - 16 x 23 1/2 x 13 in.

WILLIAM MORRIS

AUGUSTE RODIN - Minotaure, version à la base carrée - bronze with brown and green patina -  24 x 28 1/2 x 27 in.

AUGUSTE RODIN

Spring, an unusually large-scale oil painting by William Wendt, depicts a huge expanse of blue, almost cloudless California sky over a wide, flat plain of verdant grass.  The only other adornments to this landscape are stands of tall, thin trees that, in the forefront, seem to tower over the far distant snow-capped mountaintop. Wendt’s Impressionist style is evident in the detailed brushwork that makes up the sky. Using short dashes of blue upon blue, Wendt builds the varying color from dark at the top to lighter blue as it nears the mountain on the horizon. Looking closely, the sky almost appears to be a mosaic, but from further back, the colors and strokes blend seamlessly to create its soft, pastel look.

WILLIAM WENDT

FRANCIS CELENTANO - Undulating Units - acrylic on canvas - 36 x 90 in.

FRANCIS CELENTANO

JOSEPH KLEITSCH - Mission Cloisters, San Juan Capistrano - oil on canvas - 22 1/8 x 27 in.

JOSEPH KLEITSCH

Afternoon Tea on the Terrace (1905-1906) was commissioned by Rodman Wanamaker as part of a mural for the Grand Deluxe Shelburn hotel in Atlantic City. The mural was later divided into seven pieces that were displayed in the hotel dining room. Frieseke’s earliest mural work was for his patron, Rodman Wanamaker. Other commissions included mural decorations that were installed in Wanamaer’s New York department store in 1904 and 1907, the Rodman Wanamaker Hotel in 1905, and the Amphitheater of Music in New York in 1908. Art historians credit Wanamaker’s constant commissions as being the sole reason Frieseke was able to devote himself to painting.

FREDERICK FRIESEKE

RICHARD ANUSZKIEWICZ - Moonbow - acrylic on canvas - 48 x 48 in.

RICHARD ANUSZKIEWICZ

SERGEJ JENSEN - Men with Hats - canvas collage on canvas - 71 x 51 1/2 in

SERGEJ JENSEN

WILLIAM MORRIS - Artifact Pouch - blown glass - 20 x 20 x 20 in.

WILLIAM MORRIS

IRVING NORMAN - Carousel Restaurant - oil on canvas - 60 x 72 in.

IRVING NORMAN

GEORGE CONDO - Girl With Bow Tie - oil on canvas - 39 1/4 x 28 3/4 in

GEORGE CONDO

This is the Portrait of Hedda Nova, painted by Joseph Kleitsch. The film industry provided plenty of commissions for Kleitsch, as he was contracted with the prominent LA dealer Earl Stendahl as an in-house portraitist at the time. Hedda was born Hedda Puscewski in Soviet Russia, what is now Ukraine. She became a silent film star, though she never transitioned into talking films due to her thick Russian accent. During the height of her acting career, she was still working hard on learning to speak English. She was married to American actor and director Paul Hurst from 1919 to 1953 when, sadly, he committed suicide after being diagnosed with terminal cancer. This portrait depicts Hedda in a lovely black and gold gown with gossamer sleeves. As a silent film actress, trained to emote without words, it is easy to imagine that her expressive eyes and dramatic hand at her chest are telling the viewer a story.

JOSEPH KLEITSCH

GENE DAVIS - Licorice Stick - acrylic on canvas - 80 3/4 x 32 3/4 in.

GENE DAVIS

"Bringing in the Ears" is a composition drawing for an advertisement for Niblets Corn, published in the August 10, 1942 edition of Life magazine. This drawing has been in the same family collection since 1970.
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<br>Among the most noteworthy illustrators this country has ever produced, Wyeth is also the patriarch of one of America’s most esteemed artistic dynasties. His son Andrew and grandson Jamie rank among the most respected artists of their generations, heavily influenced by other artists in the extended Wyeth family. N.C. Wyeth, in addition to illustrating more than 100 books, including adventure classics like Treasure Island, Kidnapped, Robinson Crusoe, and The Last of the Mohicans, was also a highly regarded muralist, receiving numerous commissions for prestigious corporate and government buildings throughout the United States.
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<br>Wyeth’s style, honed by early work at the Saturday Evening Post and Scribner’s, demonstrates his keen awareness of the revealing gesture, allowing readers to instantly grasp the essence of a scene. He possessed a rare ability to depict subjects and events from a child’s point of view, and is particularly known for dramatizing characters by the use of long shadow, a technique that is said to have influenced the epic moviemaking style of the 1940s. In addition to providing supplementary drama and excitement to the written word, Wyeth’s works have become classics in and of themselves.

N.C. WYETH

IRVING NORMAN - Frosted Window - oil on canvas - 36 x 90 in.

IRVING NORMAN

PATRICK WILSON - Meadowlark - acrylic on canvas - 86 x 70 x 2 in

PATRICK WILSON

Karl Benjamin was a fixture of the American West Coast School. His work was featured in the "Four Abstract Classicists" exhibition in 1959-60 at the San Francisco Museum of Art (now the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art) and the Los Angeles County Museum at Exposition Park (now the Los Angeles County Museum of Art) alongside Lorser Feitelson, John McLaughlin, and Frederick Hammersley. That exhibition was viewed as Los Angeles' answer to Abstract Expressionism as the West Coast artists' hard edge paintings offered an alternative style to the New York School's energetic brushwork and action painting.
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<br>Benjamin also had a prominent place in "Birth of the Cool: California Art, Design and Culture at Mid-Century," a 2007-09 national traveling show organized by the Orange County Museum of Art.

KARL BENJAMIN

KARL BENJAMIN - Untitled - oil on canvas - 50 1/4 x 50 in.

KARL BENJAMIN

ARNE HIERSOUX - Untitled - acrylic and paper on canvas - 71 x 94 in.

ARNE HIERSOUX

GUILLERMO KUITCA - Untitled - oil on plywood - 18 1/4 x 25 5/8 in.

GUILLERMO KUITCA

In this portrait by Joseph Kleitsch, the sitter is unknown, the painting titled only Woman in Pink. She is wearing a pink dress with white lace sleeves trailing down and into in her lap. She is holding a bit of the lace in her hands, almost absent-mindedly as she tilts her head toward the painter and gives him a small, amused smile. Her hair is swept into a modest updo, and the pink flushing her cheeks echoes the pink of her dress. Kleitsch’s technique in rendering the lace is fascinating, as he seems to have only fully painted the pattern of the lace and the rest is made up of a few light and minimal strokes of the brush, lending it a sheer quality.

JOSEPH KLEITSCH

KARL BENJAMIN - Untitled - oil on canvas - 50 x 38 1/4 in.

KARL BENJAMIN

RICHARD ANUSZKIEWICZ - Arcade of Verdue - oil on canvas - 33 x 24 in.

RICHARD ANUSZKIEWICZ

DAMIEN HIRST - The Souls on Jacob's Ladder Take Their Flight - color photogravure etching - 47 1/2 x 43 1/4 in.

DAMIEN HIRST

MARC CHAGALL - A Sequestered Garden - original lithograph in colors - 23 3/4 x 20 in.

MARC CHAGALL

MARC CHAGALL - Le Cirque M.505 - lithograph - 16 3/4 x 12 3/4 in.

MARC CHAGALL

HERB ALPERT - Eagle Falls - bronze - 41 1/2 x 10 x 10 in.

HERB ALPERT

HERB ALPERT - First Impression - bronze - 37 3/4 x 8 x 8 in.

HERB ALPERT

HERB ALPERT - Three Feathers - bronze - 38 x 20 x 9 in.

HERB ALPERT

LINDA PERLMAN - The Snake River - Tibetan wool - 96 x 120 in.

LINDA PERLMAN

GIORGIO DE CHIRICO - Il Trovatore - original lithograph in five colors on paper - 27 x 21 in.

GIORGIO DE CHIRICO

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled - graphite and crayon on paper - 12 x 8 7/8 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled - graphite and crayon on paper - 12 x 8 7/8 in.

IRVING NORMAN

PIERRE-AUGUSTE RENOIR - Femme Nue Assise - original soft ground etching - 9 7/8 x 7 3/4 in.

PIERRE-AUGUSTE RENOIR

IRVING NORMAN - From Work - lithograph on paper - 20 x 25 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Fire Bird) - graphite and crayon on paper - 12 x 8 7/8 in.

IRVING NORMAN