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IRVING NORMAN
WILLIAM THEOPHILUS BROWN
GRACE HARTIGAN
NATHAN OLIVEIRA
HASSEL SMITH
JAE KON PARK
PAUL WONNER
Blood Cinema is an elegant and interactive masterwork of steel and acrylic by Anish Kapoor. The artist’s most notable works are grand-scale public installations that explore perception, captivating and challenging viewers worldwide with iconic public installations such as Chicago’s Cloud Gate (2006) and in his well-known glass and mirror pieces. Resting on the floor like an oversized lens, Blood Cinema warps the viewer’s perspective and distorts its environment through ethereal shades of red, epitomizing Kapoor's capacity for viewer immersion.

ANISH KAPOOR

"San Loretto" (2008) references a story from the Catholic faith, in which the house of the Holy Family was miraculously transported out of Nazareth for protection during the Crusades. The story appeals to Anselm Kiefer's distinctive visual themes of ruin and renewal, depicting the great effort of carrying the structure to Italy while speaking to the destruction of the Crusades. The buildup of fragments and rubble on San Loretto coalesces into an image of a bird, which combined with the title and its layers of meaning, suggests the figure of a dove and even the Holy Spirit. Kiefer has said, “People think of ruins as the end of something, but for me they were the beginning. When you have ruins you can start again."
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<br>The painting shows Kiefer’s desire to create a self-contained world within the confines of the canvas; the winged form flies effortlessly across a vast, open landscape created using Kiefer’s favored thick-Impasto surface.  
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<br>Kiefer draws from a variety of sources for the subjects of his work, including Judeo-Christian themes, mythological subjects, and German history itself.  Kiefer can produce some of the most provocative and innovative works of our time using his automatic process. Much like the spontaneous working nature of Jackson Pollock before him, Kiefer is spiritually connected to the work during the creative process, letting his subject come through at the moment.    
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<br>In honor of Kiefer’s 70th birthday, the Centre Pompidou, the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris, and the Museum der bildenden Künste in Leipzig hosted a retrospective exhibition for the artist in 2015.  The present work has been held in a private collection since its creation.

ANSELM KIEFER

Larry Rivers is considered by many to be the father of the Pop Art movement.  In Rivers's 1980 work "Beyond Camel," we see a slightly out of focus Camel Cigarette pack, an item from consumer culture Rivers has appropriated to create a critique of commoditization and consumer culture. Rivers would have certainly been aware of the work of Stuart Davis and his 1921 painting, "Lucky Strike," depicting a flattened pack of cigarettes. Rivers interprets his subject with a Pop Art perspective; however, the imagery is almost larger than life, and the brand image is presented as a subject unto itself.  
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<br>In 2002, a retrospective of Rivers's work was held at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

LARRY RIVERS

Deborah Butterfield is an American sculptor, best known for her sculptures of horses made of objects ranging from wood, metal, and other found objects. The 1981 piece, Untitled (Horse), is comprised of sticks and paper on wire armature. The impressive scale of this piece creates a remarkable effect in person, presenting a striking example of Butterfield's celebrated subject matter. Butterfield originally created the horses from wood and other materials found on her property in Bozeman, Montana and saw the horses as a metaphorical self-portrait, mining the emotional resonance of these forms.

DEBORAH BUTTERFIELD