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N.C. WYETH (1882-1945)

 
Initially used as a frontispiece illustration for the 1914 novel, “The Witch,” by Mary Johnston, Wyeth’s painting presents a poignant scene of friendship and understanding between a grieving, independent woman and a generous, misunderstood doctor. Although the two hardly know each other, they have a shared understanding of and reverence for what is good. While the rest of the town searches for the devil in all things, these two choose kindness and light. Here, they take a moment to appreciate the lives they have led and the good they have done. Wyeth’s illustration depicts hope and expectation of good despite the perils and sorrows of human life.
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<br>In addition to illustrating more than 100 books, including adventure classics like Treasure Island, Kidnapped, Robinson Crusoe, and The Last of the Mohicans, Wyeth was also a highly regarded muralist, receiving numerous commissions for prestigious corporate and government buildings throughout the United States. Wyeth’s style, honed by early work at the Saturday Evening Post and Scribner’s, demonstrates his keen awareness of the revealing gesture, allowing readers to instantly grasp the essence of a scene. Initially used as a frontispiece illustration for the 1914 novel, “The Witch,” by Mary Johnston, Wyeth’s painting presents a poignant scene of friendship and understanding between a grieving, independent woman and a generous, misunderstood doctor. Although the two hardly know each other, they have a shared understanding of and reverence for what is good. While the rest of the town searches for the devil in all things, these two choose kindness and light. Here, they take a moment to appreciate the lives they have led and the good they have done. Wyeth’s illustration depicts hope and expectation of good despite the perils and sorrows of human life.
<br>
<br>In addition to illustrating more than 100 books, including adventure classics like Treasure Island, Kidnapped, Robinson Crusoe, and The Last of the Mohicans, Wyeth was also a highly regarded muralist, receiving numerous commissions for prestigious corporate and government buildings throughout the United States. Wyeth’s style, honed by early work at the Saturday Evening Post and Scribner’s, demonstrates his keen awareness of the revealing gesture, allowing readers to instantly grasp the essence of a scene. Initially used as a frontispiece illustration for the 1914 novel, “The Witch,” by Mary Johnston, Wyeth’s painting presents a poignant scene of friendship and understanding between a grieving, independent woman and a generous, misunderstood doctor. Although the two hardly know each other, they have a shared understanding of and reverence for what is good. While the rest of the town searches for the devil in all things, these two choose kindness and light. Here, they take a moment to appreciate the lives they have led and the good they have done. Wyeth’s illustration depicts hope and expectation of good despite the perils and sorrows of human life.
<br>
<br>In addition to illustrating more than 100 books, including adventure classics like Treasure Island, Kidnapped, Robinson Crusoe, and The Last of the Mohicans, Wyeth was also a highly regarded muralist, receiving numerous commissions for prestigious corporate and government buildings throughout the United States. Wyeth’s style, honed by early work at the Saturday Evening Post and Scribner’s, demonstrates his keen awareness of the revealing gesture, allowing readers to instantly grasp the essence of a scene. Initially used as a frontispiece illustration for the 1914 novel, “The Witch,” by Mary Johnston, Wyeth’s painting presents a poignant scene of friendship and understanding between a grieving, independent woman and a generous, misunderstood doctor. Although the two hardly know each other, they have a shared understanding of and reverence for what is good. While the rest of the town searches for the devil in all things, these two choose kindness and light. Here, they take a moment to appreciate the lives they have led and the good they have done. Wyeth’s illustration depicts hope and expectation of good despite the perils and sorrows of human life.
<br>
<br>In addition to illustrating more than 100 books, including adventure classics like Treasure Island, Kidnapped, Robinson Crusoe, and The Last of the Mohicans, Wyeth was also a highly regarded muralist, receiving numerous commissions for prestigious corporate and government buildings throughout the United States. Wyeth’s style, honed by early work at the Saturday Evening Post and Scribner’s, demonstrates his keen awareness of the revealing gesture, allowing readers to instantly grasp the essence of a scene. Initially used as a frontispiece illustration for the 1914 novel, “The Witch,” by Mary Johnston, Wyeth’s painting presents a poignant scene of friendship and understanding between a grieving, independent woman and a generous, misunderstood doctor. Although the two hardly know each other, they have a shared understanding of and reverence for what is good. While the rest of the town searches for the devil in all things, these two choose kindness and light. Here, they take a moment to appreciate the lives they have led and the good they have done. Wyeth’s illustration depicts hope and expectation of good despite the perils and sorrows of human life.
<br>
<br>In addition to illustrating more than 100 books, including adventure classics like Treasure Island, Kidnapped, Robinson Crusoe, and The Last of the Mohicans, Wyeth was also a highly regarded muralist, receiving numerous commissions for prestigious corporate and government buildings throughout the United States. Wyeth’s style, honed by early work at the Saturday Evening Post and Scribner’s, demonstrates his keen awareness of the revealing gesture, allowing readers to instantly grasp the essence of a scene. Initially used as a frontispiece illustration for the 1914 novel, “The Witch,” by Mary Johnston, Wyeth’s painting presents a poignant scene of friendship and understanding between a grieving, independent woman and a generous, misunderstood doctor. Although the two hardly know each other, they have a shared understanding of and reverence for what is good. While the rest of the town searches for the devil in all things, these two choose kindness and light. Here, they take a moment to appreciate the lives they have led and the good they have done. Wyeth’s illustration depicts hope and expectation of good despite the perils and sorrows of human life.
<br>
<br>In addition to illustrating more than 100 books, including adventure classics like Treasure Island, Kidnapped, Robinson Crusoe, and The Last of the Mohicans, Wyeth was also a highly regarded muralist, receiving numerous commissions for prestigious corporate and government buildings throughout the United States. Wyeth’s style, honed by early work at the Saturday Evening Post and Scribner’s, demonstrates his keen awareness of the revealing gesture, allowing readers to instantly grasp the essence of a scene. Initially used as a frontispiece illustration for the 1914 novel, “The Witch,” by Mary Johnston, Wyeth’s painting presents a poignant scene of friendship and understanding between a grieving, independent woman and a generous, misunderstood doctor. Although the two hardly know each other, they have a shared understanding of and reverence for what is good. While the rest of the town searches for the devil in all things, these two choose kindness and light. Here, they take a moment to appreciate the lives they have led and the good they have done. Wyeth’s illustration depicts hope and expectation of good despite the perils and sorrows of human life.
<br>
<br>In addition to illustrating more than 100 books, including adventure classics like Treasure Island, Kidnapped, Robinson Crusoe, and The Last of the Mohicans, Wyeth was also a highly regarded muralist, receiving numerous commissions for prestigious corporate and government buildings throughout the United States. Wyeth’s style, honed by early work at the Saturday Evening Post and Scribner’s, demonstrates his keen awareness of the revealing gesture, allowing readers to instantly grasp the essence of a scene. Initially used as a frontispiece illustration for the 1914 novel, “The Witch,” by Mary Johnston, Wyeth’s painting presents a poignant scene of friendship and understanding between a grieving, independent woman and a generous, misunderstood doctor. Although the two hardly know each other, they have a shared understanding of and reverence for what is good. While the rest of the town searches for the devil in all things, these two choose kindness and light. Here, they take a moment to appreciate the lives they have led and the good they have done. Wyeth’s illustration depicts hope and expectation of good despite the perils and sorrows of human life.
<br>
<br>In addition to illustrating more than 100 books, including adventure classics like Treasure Island, Kidnapped, Robinson Crusoe, and The Last of the Mohicans, Wyeth was also a highly regarded muralist, receiving numerous commissions for prestigious corporate and government buildings throughout the United States. Wyeth’s style, honed by early work at the Saturday Evening Post and Scribner’s, demonstrates his keen awareness of the revealing gesture, allowing readers to instantly grasp the essence of a scene. Initially used as a frontispiece illustration for the 1914 novel, “The Witch,” by Mary Johnston, Wyeth’s painting presents a poignant scene of friendship and understanding between a grieving, independent woman and a generous, misunderstood doctor. Although the two hardly know each other, they have a shared understanding of and reverence for what is good. While the rest of the town searches for the devil in all things, these two choose kindness and light. Here, they take a moment to appreciate the lives they have led and the good they have done. Wyeth’s illustration depicts hope and expectation of good despite the perils and sorrows of human life.
<br>
<br>In addition to illustrating more than 100 books, including adventure classics like Treasure Island, Kidnapped, Robinson Crusoe, and The Last of the Mohicans, Wyeth was also a highly regarded muralist, receiving numerous commissions for prestigious corporate and government buildings throughout the United States. Wyeth’s style, honed by early work at the Saturday Evening Post and Scribner’s, demonstrates his keen awareness of the revealing gesture, allowing readers to instantly grasp the essence of a scene.
"Good-bye, Mistress Friendly-Soul!"191444 1/8 x 32 1/8 in. oil on canvas
Provenance
Private Collection, by descent
Clare McKinney Murphy, Dallas, Texas
Collection of Frank Hines, Chicago
Literature
Douglas Allen and Douglas Allen, Jr., N. C. Wyeth, The Collected Paintings, Illustrations and Murals (New York: Crown Publishers, 1972), p. 208
Christine B. Podmaniczky, N. C. Wyeth, A Catalogue Raisonné of Paintings (London: Scala, 2008), I.526, p. 293
Initially used as a frontispiece illustration for the 1914 novel, “The Witch,” by Mary Johnston, Wyeth’s painting presents a poignant scene of friendship and understanding between a grieving, independent woman and a generous, misunderstood doctor. Although the two hardly know each other, they have a shared understanding of and reverence for what is good. While the rest of the town searches for the devil in all things, these two choose kindness and light. Here, they take a moment to appreciate the lives they have led and the good they have done. Wyeth’s illustration depicts hope and expectation of good despite the perils and sorrows of human life.

In addition to illustrating more than 100 books, including adventure classics like Treasure Island, Kidnapped, Robinson Crusoe, and The Last of the Mohicans, Wyeth was also a highly regarded muralist, receiving numerous commissions for prestigious corporate and government buildings throughout the United States. Wyeth’s style, honed by early work at the Saturday Evening Post and Scribner’s, demonstrates his keen awareness of the revealing gesture, allowing readers to instantly grasp the essence of a scene.
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