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ALEX KATZ (b. 1927)

 
ALEX KATZ - Untitled - oil on masonite - 11 7/8 x 15 3/4 in. ALEX KATZ - Untitled - oil on masonite - 11 7/8 x 15 3/4 in. ALEX KATZ - Untitled - oil on masonite - 11 7/8 x 15 3/4 in. ALEX KATZ - Untitled - oil on masonite - 11 7/8 x 15 3/4 in. ALEX KATZ - Untitled - oil on masonite - 11 7/8 x 15 3/4 in. ALEX KATZ - Untitled - oil on masonite - 11 7/8 x 15 3/4 in. ALEX KATZ - Untitled - oil on masonite - 11 7/8 x 15 3/4 in. ALEX KATZ - Untitled - oil on masonite - 11 7/8 x 15 3/4 in.
Untitled198811 7/8 x 15 3/4 in. oil on masonite
Provenance
Galleria Monica De Cardenas, Milan
Private Collection, acquired from above
Phillips London, "20th Century & Contemporary Art Day Sale", Sale No. UK010517, Lot 279, 30 June 2017
Private Collection, Puerto Rico

75,000

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