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JEFF KOONS (b. 1955)

 
JEFF KOONS - Train (blue) - screenprint with digital inkjet on Somerset paper - 32 x 25 1/4 in. JEFF KOONS - Train (blue) - screenprint with digital inkjet on Somerset paper - 32 x 25 1/4 in. JEFF KOONS - Train (blue) - screenprint with digital inkjet on Somerset paper - 32 x 25 1/4 in. JEFF KOONS - Train (blue) - screenprint with digital inkjet on Somerset paper - 32 x 25 1/4 in. JEFF KOONS - Train (blue) - screenprint with digital inkjet on Somerset paper - 32 x 25 1/4 in. JEFF KOONS - Train (blue) - screenprint with digital inkjet on Somerset paper - 32 x 25 1/4 in. JEFF KOONS - Train (blue) - screenprint with digital inkjet on Somerset paper - 32 x 25 1/4 in. JEFF KOONS - Train (blue) - screenprint with digital inkjet on Somerset paper - 32 x 25 1/4 in. JEFF KOONS - Train (blue) - screenprint with digital inkjet on Somerset paper - 32 x 25 1/4 in. JEFF KOONS - Train (blue) - screenprint with digital inkjet on Somerset paper - 32 x 25 1/4 in.
Train (blue)200732 x 25 1/4 in. screenprint with digital inkjet on Somerset paper
Provenance
Kenneth A. Friedman & Co., California
Private Collection, California, 2016

40,000

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