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MATT JOHNSON (b. 1978)

 
MATT JOHNSON - Pieta - cast bronze - 65 x 58 x 40 in. MATT JOHNSON - Pieta - cast bronze - 65 x 58 x 40 in. MATT JOHNSON - Pieta - cast bronze - 65 x 58 x 40 in. MATT JOHNSON - Pieta - cast bronze - 65 x 58 x 40 in. MATT JOHNSON - Pieta - cast bronze - 65 x 58 x 40 in. MATT JOHNSON - Pieta - cast bronze - 65 x 58 x 40 in. MATT JOHNSON - Pieta - cast bronze - 65 x 58 x 40 in. MATT JOHNSON - Pieta - cast bronze - 65 x 58 x 40 in. MATT JOHNSON - Pieta - cast bronze - 65 x 58 x 40 in. MATT JOHNSON - Pieta - cast bronze - 65 x 58 x 40 in.
Pieta200665 x 58 x 40 in. cast bronze
Provenance
Blum & Poe, Los Angeles
Private Collection, Idaho, 2006

230,000

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Similar Artworks

The stands are: The 32 H x 19-3/4 W x 19-3/4 D in.
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<br>Rat: 27 7/8 x 12 7/8 x 20 7/8 in.
<br>Ox: 29 1/8 x 20 1/8 x 16 7/8
<br>Tiger: 25 7/8 x 14 7/8 x 16 7/8
<br>Rabbit: 27 7/8 x 9 7/8 x 18 7/8
<br>Dragon: 35 7/8 x 18 1/8 x 25 7/8
<br>Snake: 27 7/8 x 14 1/8 x 6 3/4
<br>Horse: 29 1/8 x 12 1/4 x 22
<br>Ram: 25 1/4 x 20 7/8 x 16 1/8
<br>Monkey: 27 1/8 x 12 7/8 x 14 7/8
<br>Rooster: 24 x 9 x 16 7/8
<br>Dog: 25 1/4 x 14 7/8 x 18 7/8
<br>Boar: 27 1/8 x 16 1/8 x 20 7/8

AI WEIWEI

San Loretto (2008) references a story from the Catholic faith, in which the house of the Holy Family was miraculously transported out of Nazareth for protection during the Crusades. The story appeals to Anselm Kiefer's distinctive visual themes of ruin and renewal, depicting the great effort of carrying the structure to Italy while speaking to the destruction of the Crusades. The buildup of fragments and rubble on San Loretto coalesces into an image of a bird, which combined with the title and its layers of meaning, suggests the figure of a dove and even the Holy Spirit.

ANSELM KIEFER

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JULIAN SCHNABEL - Untitled - oil, resin, gesso, fabric and leather on seamed dropcloth - 96 x 120 in.

JULIAN SCHNABEL

Deborah Butterfield is an American sculptor, best known for her sculptures of horses made of objects ranging from wood, metal, and other found objects. The 1981 piece, Untitled (Horse), is comprised of sticks and paper on wire armature. The impressive scale of this piece creates a remarkable effect in person, presenting a striking example of Butterfield's celebrated subject matter. Butterfield originally created the horses from wood and other materials found on her property in Bozeman, Montana and saw the horses as a metaphorical self-portrait, mining the emotional resonance of these forms.

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Alex Katz is a pivotal figure in American figurative art. His colorful, stylized, flat portraiture and paintings stand in stark contrast to the Abstract Expressionism in which he came of age. Not quite minimalist, his deadpan figures have qualities that also lends comparisons to pop culture and commercial design. This painting of a man playing the ukulele highlights the sort of gatherings of young people that would interest Katz giving both the sense of cool detachment but also cool hipness.

ALEX KATZ

Henry Moore, a father of Modern British sculpture, is known for his large-scale, semi-abstract figurative sculptures in bronze, wood, and marble. This 1960 bronze sculpture of two seated figures demonstrates Moore’s gestural treatment of material. The focus on a family group is reflective of the artist’s move toward a sense of optimism after World War II. Small sculptures like this one are rare, and in subject mater and composition are reminiscent of his earlier seated figures based upon ancient Egyptian royal sculpture.

HENRY MOORE

More than an artist, Theaster Gates also works as curator, urban planner, and project facilitator. From sculpture to painting, installation to public projects, Gates’s works are hubs in which to question labor and commodity while also bringing to the fore people and things that are often unseen and unheard. Convex Concave takes custom-made bricks that Gates had previously used for Black Vessel for a Saint at the Walker Art Center and repurposes it into a painting-like sculpture that references minimalist artist like Sol LeWitt, the labor of making bricks, and the original context of the bricks for the installation at the Walker.

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ANTHONY CARO - Figure in a Tub - bronze - 42 x 30 1/4 x 24 1/4 in.

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Contemporary American artist George Condo coined the term “artificial realism” to characterize the figures that appear in his work – often described as a combination of European Old Master painting and American Pop art. Condo has defined the term as the “realistic representation of that which is artificial.” Known for figures that are often grotesque or fractured, Condo creates art that is both Contemporary and rooted in art historical tradition, drawing inspiration from Cubism or, in this case, reaching back to ancient Greece. In an uncommon work of sculpture, Condo imparts his distinctive style to the face of a Mycenaean archetype, the goddess figure.

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Contemporary Chinese artist Zhang Huan is best known for his provocative and challenging performance art. The detailed insects in this painting recall the artist's striking performance piece, 12 Square Meters (1994), in which he sat covered in honey and fish oil in an unkept public toilet, attracting flies and other insects. Here, canvas replaces flesh, allowing bugs to explore this human terrain. Earth Life No. 19 (2007) is meant to be a meditation on the ability of mind and spirit to overcome physical discomfort.

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PETER SHELTON - onelongsleeve - metal - 29 1/2 x 47 3/4 x 10 1/2 in.

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MARTIN CREED - Work No. 2147 - acrylic on canvas - 16 x 20 in.

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PETER SHELTON - noarm. - plastic and acrylic - 45 x 15 3/4 x 8 in.

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KEITH HARING - Untitled - ink on illustration board - 4 5/8 x 5 1/2 in.

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JEFF KOONS - Train (blue) - screenprint with digital inkjet on Somerset paper - 32 x 25 1/4 in.

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THOMAS WILLIAM JONES - Skagit Yellow - watercolor - 13 x 20 in.

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ROGER THOMAS - Perfected World 3 Candlestick - pastel on Dieu Donné handmade archival rag - 60 x 40 in.

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