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LARRY RIVERS (1923-2002)

 
"Lions on the Dreyfus Fund, Inc." demonstrates Rivers's Pop Art aesthetic through its repetition of imagery and a well-known corporate brand of the time. The lion forms featured prominently in the painting were a logo for the Dreyfus fund, as well as art historical symbols in their own right. Rivers would have at least seen pictures of the ancient archetypes for such imagery as the "Ishtar Gate" from 575 B.C. in what is now the country of Iraq. Rivers's love of travel and exploration brought him to Africa for seven months, where he would have been able to study a diverse menagerie for his artwork firsthand.    
<br>
<br>Another version of the painting, "Lions on the Dreyfus Fund III" (1964) is in the permanent collection of the Art Institute of Chicago. "Lions on the Dreyfus Fund, Inc." demonstrates Rivers's Pop Art aesthetic through its repetition of imagery and a well-known corporate brand of the time. The lion forms featured prominently in the painting were a logo for the Dreyfus fund, as well as art historical symbols in their own right. Rivers would have at least seen pictures of the ancient archetypes for such imagery as the "Ishtar Gate" from 575 B.C. in what is now the country of Iraq. Rivers's love of travel and exploration brought him to Africa for seven months, where he would have been able to study a diverse menagerie for his artwork firsthand.    
<br>
<br>Another version of the painting, "Lions on the Dreyfus Fund III" (1964) is in the permanent collection of the Art Institute of Chicago. "Lions on the Dreyfus Fund, Inc." demonstrates Rivers's Pop Art aesthetic through its repetition of imagery and a well-known corporate brand of the time. The lion forms featured prominently in the painting were a logo for the Dreyfus fund, as well as art historical symbols in their own right. Rivers would have at least seen pictures of the ancient archetypes for such imagery as the "Ishtar Gate" from 575 B.C. in what is now the country of Iraq. Rivers's love of travel and exploration brought him to Africa for seven months, where he would have been able to study a diverse menagerie for his artwork firsthand.    
<br>
<br>Another version of the painting, "Lions on the Dreyfus Fund III" (1964) is in the permanent collection of the Art Institute of Chicago. "Lions on the Dreyfus Fund, Inc." demonstrates Rivers's Pop Art aesthetic through its repetition of imagery and a well-known corporate brand of the time. The lion forms featured prominently in the painting were a logo for the Dreyfus fund, as well as art historical symbols in their own right. Rivers would have at least seen pictures of the ancient archetypes for such imagery as the "Ishtar Gate" from 575 B.C. in what is now the country of Iraq. Rivers's love of travel and exploration brought him to Africa for seven months, where he would have been able to study a diverse menagerie for his artwork firsthand.    
<br>
<br>Another version of the painting, "Lions on the Dreyfus Fund III" (1964) is in the permanent collection of the Art Institute of Chicago. "Lions on the Dreyfus Fund, Inc." demonstrates Rivers's Pop Art aesthetic through its repetition of imagery and a well-known corporate brand of the time. The lion forms featured prominently in the painting were a logo for the Dreyfus fund, as well as art historical symbols in their own right. Rivers would have at least seen pictures of the ancient archetypes for such imagery as the "Ishtar Gate" from 575 B.C. in what is now the country of Iraq. Rivers's love of travel and exploration brought him to Africa for seven months, where he would have been able to study a diverse menagerie for his artwork firsthand.    
<br>
<br>Another version of the painting, "Lions on the Dreyfus Fund III" (1964) is in the permanent collection of the Art Institute of Chicago. "Lions on the Dreyfus Fund, Inc." demonstrates Rivers's Pop Art aesthetic through its repetition of imagery and a well-known corporate brand of the time. The lion forms featured prominently in the painting were a logo for the Dreyfus fund, as well as art historical symbols in their own right. Rivers would have at least seen pictures of the ancient archetypes for such imagery as the "Ishtar Gate" from 575 B.C. in what is now the country of Iraq. Rivers's love of travel and exploration brought him to Africa for seven months, where he would have been able to study a diverse menagerie for his artwork firsthand.    
<br>
<br>Another version of the painting, "Lions on the Dreyfus Fund III" (1964) is in the permanent collection of the Art Institute of Chicago. "Lions on the Dreyfus Fund, Inc." demonstrates Rivers's Pop Art aesthetic through its repetition of imagery and a well-known corporate brand of the time. The lion forms featured prominently in the painting were a logo for the Dreyfus fund, as well as art historical symbols in their own right. Rivers would have at least seen pictures of the ancient archetypes for such imagery as the "Ishtar Gate" from 575 B.C. in what is now the country of Iraq. Rivers's love of travel and exploration brought him to Africa for seven months, where he would have been able to study a diverse menagerie for his artwork firsthand.    
<br>
<br>Another version of the painting, "Lions on the Dreyfus Fund III" (1964) is in the permanent collection of the Art Institute of Chicago. "Lions on the Dreyfus Fund, Inc." demonstrates Rivers's Pop Art aesthetic through its repetition of imagery and a well-known corporate brand of the time. The lion forms featured prominently in the painting were a logo for the Dreyfus fund, as well as art historical symbols in their own right. Rivers would have at least seen pictures of the ancient archetypes for such imagery as the "Ishtar Gate" from 575 B.C. in what is now the country of Iraq. Rivers's love of travel and exploration brought him to Africa for seven months, where he would have been able to study a diverse menagerie for his artwork firsthand.    
<br>
<br>Another version of the painting, "Lions on the Dreyfus Fund III" (1964) is in the permanent collection of the Art Institute of Chicago. "Lions on the Dreyfus Fund, Inc." demonstrates Rivers's Pop Art aesthetic through its repetition of imagery and a well-known corporate brand of the time. The lion forms featured prominently in the painting were a logo for the Dreyfus fund, as well as art historical symbols in their own right. Rivers would have at least seen pictures of the ancient archetypes for such imagery as the "Ishtar Gate" from 575 B.C. in what is now the country of Iraq. Rivers's love of travel and exploration brought him to Africa for seven months, where he would have been able to study a diverse menagerie for his artwork firsthand.    
<br>
<br>Another version of the painting, "Lions on the Dreyfus Fund III" (1964) is in the permanent collection of the Art Institute of Chicago. "Lions on the Dreyfus Fund, Inc." demonstrates Rivers's Pop Art aesthetic through its repetition of imagery and a well-known corporate brand of the time. The lion forms featured prominently in the painting were a logo for the Dreyfus fund, as well as art historical symbols in their own right. Rivers would have at least seen pictures of the ancient archetypes for such imagery as the "Ishtar Gate" from 575 B.C. in what is now the country of Iraq. Rivers's love of travel and exploration brought him to Africa for seven months, where he would have been able to study a diverse menagerie for his artwork firsthand.    
<br>
<br>Another version of the painting, "Lions on the Dreyfus Fund III" (1964) is in the permanent collection of the Art Institute of Chicago.
Lions on the Dreyfus Fund, Inc.196463 x 35 1/2 in. pencil and oil on cut wood and canvas
Provenance
Marlborough Gallery, New York
Private Collection, New York, acquired from the above in 1966
Private Collection, gift from the above
Sotheby’s Contemporary Art, Morning, New York, November 15, 2006, [Lot 248]
Private Collection, Washington
"Lions on the Dreyfus Fund, Inc." demonstrates Rivers's Pop Art aesthetic through its repetition of imagery and a well-known corporate brand of the time. The lion forms featured prominently in the painting were a logo for the Dreyfus fund, as well as art historical symbols in their own right. Rivers would have at least seen pictures of the ancient archetypes for such imagery as the "Ishtar Gate" from 575 B.C. in what is now the country of Iraq. Rivers's love of travel and exploration brought him to Africa for seven months, where he would have been able to study a diverse menagerie for his artwork firsthand.

Another version of the painting, "Lions on the Dreyfus Fund III" (1964) is in the permanent collection of the Art Institute of Chicago.
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