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JAMES ROSENQUIST (1933-2017)

 
James Rosenquist's contributions to Pop Art's development, along with his contemporaries Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, and Roy Lichtenstein, would leave an indelible mark on art history. Rosenquist's humble beginnings as a billboard painter were a stark contrast to his widely acknowledged status as one of the greatest artists of his generation at the time of his death in 2017.  
<br>
<br>"Samba School" (1986) is a billboard-scale work imbued with a sense of movement and color, much like the dance that inspired the painting. Rosenquist's iconic work, "F-111" (1964-65) at the Museum of Modern art in New York, shares a similar sense of scale and visual energy. Rosenquist's developments in the 1960s and 1970s led to a high level of proficiency in working with these large paintings from which a distinct and powerful visual language emerge.
<br>
<br>This painting was featured in the 1987 Oliver Stone film "Wall Street" as well as the 2003-2004 exhibition, "James Rosenquist: A Retrospective," which traveled between the Menil Collection and the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, and featured prominently at the Guggenheim Museum in the artist's beloved New York City. James Rosenquist's contributions to Pop Art's development, along with his contemporaries Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, and Roy Lichtenstein, would leave an indelible mark on art history. Rosenquist's humble beginnings as a billboard painter were a stark contrast to his widely acknowledged status as one of the greatest artists of his generation at the time of his death in 2017.  
<br>
<br>"Samba School" (1986) is a billboard-scale work imbued with a sense of movement and color, much like the dance that inspired the painting. Rosenquist's iconic work, "F-111" (1964-65) at the Museum of Modern art in New York, shares a similar sense of scale and visual energy. Rosenquist's developments in the 1960s and 1970s led to a high level of proficiency in working with these large paintings from which a distinct and powerful visual language emerge.
<br>
<br>This painting was featured in the 1987 Oliver Stone film "Wall Street" as well as the 2003-2004 exhibition, "James Rosenquist: A Retrospective," which traveled between the Menil Collection and the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, and featured prominently at the Guggenheim Museum in the artist's beloved New York City. James Rosenquist's contributions to Pop Art's development, along with his contemporaries Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, and Roy Lichtenstein, would leave an indelible mark on art history. Rosenquist's humble beginnings as a billboard painter were a stark contrast to his widely acknowledged status as one of the greatest artists of his generation at the time of his death in 2017.  
<br>
<br>"Samba School" (1986) is a billboard-scale work imbued with a sense of movement and color, much like the dance that inspired the painting. Rosenquist's iconic work, "F-111" (1964-65) at the Museum of Modern art in New York, shares a similar sense of scale and visual energy. Rosenquist's developments in the 1960s and 1970s led to a high level of proficiency in working with these large paintings from which a distinct and powerful visual language emerge.
<br>
<br>This painting was featured in the 1987 Oliver Stone film "Wall Street" as well as the 2003-2004 exhibition, "James Rosenquist: A Retrospective," which traveled between the Menil Collection and the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, and featured prominently at the Guggenheim Museum in the artist's beloved New York City. James Rosenquist's contributions to Pop Art's development, along with his contemporaries Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, and Roy Lichtenstein, would leave an indelible mark on art history. Rosenquist's humble beginnings as a billboard painter were a stark contrast to his widely acknowledged status as one of the greatest artists of his generation at the time of his death in 2017.  
<br>
<br>"Samba School" (1986) is a billboard-scale work imbued with a sense of movement and color, much like the dance that inspired the painting. Rosenquist's iconic work, "F-111" (1964-65) at the Museum of Modern art in New York, shares a similar sense of scale and visual energy. Rosenquist's developments in the 1960s and 1970s led to a high level of proficiency in working with these large paintings from which a distinct and powerful visual language emerge.
<br>
<br>This painting was featured in the 1987 Oliver Stone film "Wall Street" as well as the 2003-2004 exhibition, "James Rosenquist: A Retrospective," which traveled between the Menil Collection and the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, and featured prominently at the Guggenheim Museum in the artist's beloved New York City. James Rosenquist's contributions to Pop Art's development, along with his contemporaries Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, and Roy Lichtenstein, would leave an indelible mark on art history. Rosenquist's humble beginnings as a billboard painter were a stark contrast to his widely acknowledged status as one of the greatest artists of his generation at the time of his death in 2017.  
<br>
<br>"Samba School" (1986) is a billboard-scale work imbued with a sense of movement and color, much like the dance that inspired the painting. Rosenquist's iconic work, "F-111" (1964-65) at the Museum of Modern art in New York, shares a similar sense of scale and visual energy. Rosenquist's developments in the 1960s and 1970s led to a high level of proficiency in working with these large paintings from which a distinct and powerful visual language emerge.
<br>
<br>This painting was featured in the 1987 Oliver Stone film "Wall Street" as well as the 2003-2004 exhibition, "James Rosenquist: A Retrospective," which traveled between the Menil Collection and the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, and featured prominently at the Guggenheim Museum in the artist's beloved New York City. James Rosenquist's contributions to Pop Art's development, along with his contemporaries Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, and Roy Lichtenstein, would leave an indelible mark on art history. Rosenquist's humble beginnings as a billboard painter were a stark contrast to his widely acknowledged status as one of the greatest artists of his generation at the time of his death in 2017.  
<br>
<br>"Samba School" (1986) is a billboard-scale work imbued with a sense of movement and color, much like the dance that inspired the painting. Rosenquist's iconic work, "F-111" (1964-65) at the Museum of Modern art in New York, shares a similar sense of scale and visual energy. Rosenquist's developments in the 1960s and 1970s led to a high level of proficiency in working with these large paintings from which a distinct and powerful visual language emerge.
<br>
<br>This painting was featured in the 1987 Oliver Stone film "Wall Street" as well as the 2003-2004 exhibition, "James Rosenquist: A Retrospective," which traveled between the Menil Collection and the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, and featured prominently at the Guggenheim Museum in the artist's beloved New York City. James Rosenquist's contributions to Pop Art's development, along with his contemporaries Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, and Roy Lichtenstein, would leave an indelible mark on art history. Rosenquist's humble beginnings as a billboard painter were a stark contrast to his widely acknowledged status as one of the greatest artists of his generation at the time of his death in 2017.  
<br>
<br>"Samba School" (1986) is a billboard-scale work imbued with a sense of movement and color, much like the dance that inspired the painting. Rosenquist's iconic work, "F-111" (1964-65) at the Museum of Modern art in New York, shares a similar sense of scale and visual energy. Rosenquist's developments in the 1960s and 1970s led to a high level of proficiency in working with these large paintings from which a distinct and powerful visual language emerge.
<br>
<br>This painting was featured in the 1987 Oliver Stone film "Wall Street" as well as the 2003-2004 exhibition, "James Rosenquist: A Retrospective," which traveled between the Menil Collection and the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, and featured prominently at the Guggenheim Museum in the artist's beloved New York City. James Rosenquist's contributions to Pop Art's development, along with his contemporaries Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, and Roy Lichtenstein, would leave an indelible mark on art history. Rosenquist's humble beginnings as a billboard painter were a stark contrast to his widely acknowledged status as one of the greatest artists of his generation at the time of his death in 2017.  
<br>
<br>"Samba School" (1986) is a billboard-scale work imbued with a sense of movement and color, much like the dance that inspired the painting. Rosenquist's iconic work, "F-111" (1964-65) at the Museum of Modern art in New York, shares a similar sense of scale and visual energy. Rosenquist's developments in the 1960s and 1970s led to a high level of proficiency in working with these large paintings from which a distinct and powerful visual language emerge.
<br>
<br>This painting was featured in the 1987 Oliver Stone film "Wall Street" as well as the 2003-2004 exhibition, "James Rosenquist: A Retrospective," which traveled between the Menil Collection and the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, and featured prominently at the Guggenheim Museum in the artist's beloved New York City. James Rosenquist's contributions to Pop Art's development, along with his contemporaries Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, and Roy Lichtenstein, would leave an indelible mark on art history. Rosenquist's humble beginnings as a billboard painter were a stark contrast to his widely acknowledged status as one of the greatest artists of his generation at the time of his death in 2017.  
<br>
<br>"Samba School" (1986) is a billboard-scale work imbued with a sense of movement and color, much like the dance that inspired the painting. Rosenquist's iconic work, "F-111" (1964-65) at the Museum of Modern art in New York, shares a similar sense of scale and visual energy. Rosenquist's developments in the 1960s and 1970s led to a high level of proficiency in working with these large paintings from which a distinct and powerful visual language emerge.
<br>
<br>This painting was featured in the 1987 Oliver Stone film "Wall Street" as well as the 2003-2004 exhibition, "James Rosenquist: A Retrospective," which traveled between the Menil Collection and the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, and featured prominently at the Guggenheim Museum in the artist's beloved New York City. James Rosenquist's contributions to Pop Art's development, along with his contemporaries Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, and Roy Lichtenstein, would leave an indelible mark on art history. Rosenquist's humble beginnings as a billboard painter were a stark contrast to his widely acknowledged status as one of the greatest artists of his generation at the time of his death in 2017.  
<br>
<br>"Samba School" (1986) is a billboard-scale work imbued with a sense of movement and color, much like the dance that inspired the painting. Rosenquist's iconic work, "F-111" (1964-65) at the Museum of Modern art in New York, shares a similar sense of scale and visual energy. Rosenquist's developments in the 1960s and 1970s led to a high level of proficiency in working with these large paintings from which a distinct and powerful visual language emerge.
<br>
<br>This painting was featured in the 1987 Oliver Stone film "Wall Street" as well as the 2003-2004 exhibition, "James Rosenquist: A Retrospective," which traveled between the Menil Collection and the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, and featured prominently at the Guggenheim Museum in the artist's beloved New York City.
Samba School198678 x 132 in. oil on canvas over panel
Provenance
Richard L. Feigen & Co., New York
The Peter B. Lewis Collection
Sotheby's, Contemporary Art Day Auction, November 2014, lot 232
Private Collection, New York
Private Collection, Florida
Literature
Oliver Stone, Director, Wall Street, USA, 1987, Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation
James Rosenquist's contributions to Pop Art's development, along with his contemporaries Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, and Roy Lichtenstein, would leave an indelible mark on art history. Rosenquist's humble beginnings as a billboard painter were a stark contrast to his widely acknowledged status as one of the greatest artists of his generation at the time of his death in 2017.

"Samba School" (1986) is a billboard-scale work imbued with a sense of movement and color, much like the dance that inspired the painting. Rosenquist's iconic work, "F-111" (1964-65) at the Museum of Modern art in New York, shares a similar sense of scale and visual energy. Rosenquist's developments in the 1960s and 1970s led to a high level of proficiency in working with these large paintings from which a distinct and powerful visual language emerge.

This painting was featured in the 1987 Oliver Stone film "Wall Street" as well as the 2003-2004 exhibition, "James Rosenquist: A Retrospective," which traveled between the Menil Collection and the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, and featured prominently at the Guggenheim Museum in the artist's beloved New York City.
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