Back

DEBORAH BUTTERFIELD (b. 1949)

 
In the 1970s, Butterfield made her first horses from plaster, papier-mâché, and mud and sticks. In 1980, she traveled to Israel on a John Simon Guggenheim grant, and worked with steel and other detritus of wars, and determined the material held emotional content. This set her on a course of making horses with found and welded steel, fused aluminum, copper, and wood — materials that also have a history. Butterfield’s “Yellow River,” c. 1984, is an uncommon example of the artist’s work as the subject is in repose with an experimental minimalist aesthetic. Created using scrap metal from a school bus, the painted steel elements seem to combine organically. Butterfield is widely recognized for her materials-oriented approach to sculpture. 
<br>
<br>Deborah Butterfield's work is included in numerous museum collections, including the Honolulu Museum of Art, the Rockwell Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Delaware Art Museum, the Boise Art Museum, the Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art, the Neuberger Museum of Art, and the Rockford Art Museum among many others. In the 1970s, Butterfield made her first horses from plaster, papier-mâché, and mud and sticks. In 1980, she traveled to Israel on a John Simon Guggenheim grant, and worked with steel and other detritus of wars, and determined the material held emotional content. This set her on a course of making horses with found and welded steel, fused aluminum, copper, and wood — materials that also have a history. Butterfield’s “Yellow River,” c. 1984, is an uncommon example of the artist’s work as the subject is in repose with an experimental minimalist aesthetic. Created using scrap metal from a school bus, the painted steel elements seem to combine organically. Butterfield is widely recognized for her materials-oriented approach to sculpture. 
<br>
<br>Deborah Butterfield's work is included in numerous museum collections, including the Honolulu Museum of Art, the Rockwell Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Delaware Art Museum, the Boise Art Museum, the Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art, the Neuberger Museum of Art, and the Rockford Art Museum among many others. In the 1970s, Butterfield made her first horses from plaster, papier-mâché, and mud and sticks. In 1980, she traveled to Israel on a John Simon Guggenheim grant, and worked with steel and other detritus of wars, and determined the material held emotional content. This set her on a course of making horses with found and welded steel, fused aluminum, copper, and wood — materials that also have a history. Butterfield’s “Yellow River,” c. 1984, is an uncommon example of the artist’s work as the subject is in repose with an experimental minimalist aesthetic. Created using scrap metal from a school bus, the painted steel elements seem to combine organically. Butterfield is widely recognized for her materials-oriented approach to sculpture. 
<br>
<br>Deborah Butterfield's work is included in numerous museum collections, including the Honolulu Museum of Art, the Rockwell Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Delaware Art Museum, the Boise Art Museum, the Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art, the Neuberger Museum of Art, and the Rockford Art Museum among many others. In the 1970s, Butterfield made her first horses from plaster, papier-mâché, and mud and sticks. In 1980, she traveled to Israel on a John Simon Guggenheim grant, and worked with steel and other detritus of wars, and determined the material held emotional content. This set her on a course of making horses with found and welded steel, fused aluminum, copper, and wood — materials that also have a history. Butterfield’s “Yellow River,” c. 1984, is an uncommon example of the artist’s work as the subject is in repose with an experimental minimalist aesthetic. Created using scrap metal from a school bus, the painted steel elements seem to combine organically. Butterfield is widely recognized for her materials-oriented approach to sculpture. 
<br>
<br>Deborah Butterfield's work is included in numerous museum collections, including the Honolulu Museum of Art, the Rockwell Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Delaware Art Museum, the Boise Art Museum, the Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art, the Neuberger Museum of Art, and the Rockford Art Museum among many others. In the 1970s, Butterfield made her first horses from plaster, papier-mâché, and mud and sticks. In 1980, she traveled to Israel on a John Simon Guggenheim grant, and worked with steel and other detritus of wars, and determined the material held emotional content. This set her on a course of making horses with found and welded steel, fused aluminum, copper, and wood — materials that also have a history. Butterfield’s “Yellow River,” c. 1984, is an uncommon example of the artist’s work as the subject is in repose with an experimental minimalist aesthetic. Created using scrap metal from a school bus, the painted steel elements seem to combine organically. Butterfield is widely recognized for her materials-oriented approach to sculpture. 
<br>
<br>Deborah Butterfield's work is included in numerous museum collections, including the Honolulu Museum of Art, the Rockwell Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Delaware Art Museum, the Boise Art Museum, the Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art, the Neuberger Museum of Art, and the Rockford Art Museum among many others. In the 1970s, Butterfield made her first horses from plaster, papier-mâché, and mud and sticks. In 1980, she traveled to Israel on a John Simon Guggenheim grant, and worked with steel and other detritus of wars, and determined the material held emotional content. This set her on a course of making horses with found and welded steel, fused aluminum, copper, and wood — materials that also have a history. Butterfield’s “Yellow River,” c. 1984, is an uncommon example of the artist’s work as the subject is in repose with an experimental minimalist aesthetic. Created using scrap metal from a school bus, the painted steel elements seem to combine organically. Butterfield is widely recognized for her materials-oriented approach to sculpture. 
<br>
<br>Deborah Butterfield's work is included in numerous museum collections, including the Honolulu Museum of Art, the Rockwell Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Delaware Art Museum, the Boise Art Museum, the Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art, the Neuberger Museum of Art, and the Rockford Art Museum among many others. In the 1970s, Butterfield made her first horses from plaster, papier-mâché, and mud and sticks. In 1980, she traveled to Israel on a John Simon Guggenheim grant, and worked with steel and other detritus of wars, and determined the material held emotional content. This set her on a course of making horses with found and welded steel, fused aluminum, copper, and wood — materials that also have a history. Butterfield’s “Yellow River,” c. 1984, is an uncommon example of the artist’s work as the subject is in repose with an experimental minimalist aesthetic. Created using scrap metal from a school bus, the painted steel elements seem to combine organically. Butterfield is widely recognized for her materials-oriented approach to sculpture. 
<br>
<br>Deborah Butterfield's work is included in numerous museum collections, including the Honolulu Museum of Art, the Rockwell Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Delaware Art Museum, the Boise Art Museum, the Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art, the Neuberger Museum of Art, and the Rockford Art Museum among many others. In the 1970s, Butterfield made her first horses from plaster, papier-mâché, and mud and sticks. In 1980, she traveled to Israel on a John Simon Guggenheim grant, and worked with steel and other detritus of wars, and determined the material held emotional content. This set her on a course of making horses with found and welded steel, fused aluminum, copper, and wood — materials that also have a history. Butterfield’s “Yellow River,” c. 1984, is an uncommon example of the artist’s work as the subject is in repose with an experimental minimalist aesthetic. Created using scrap metal from a school bus, the painted steel elements seem to combine organically. Butterfield is widely recognized for her materials-oriented approach to sculpture. 
<br>
<br>Deborah Butterfield's work is included in numerous museum collections, including the Honolulu Museum of Art, the Rockwell Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Delaware Art Museum, the Boise Art Museum, the Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art, the Neuberger Museum of Art, and the Rockford Art Museum among many others. In the 1970s, Butterfield made her first horses from plaster, papier-mâché, and mud and sticks. In 1980, she traveled to Israel on a John Simon Guggenheim grant, and worked with steel and other detritus of wars, and determined the material held emotional content. This set her on a course of making horses with found and welded steel, fused aluminum, copper, and wood — materials that also have a history. Butterfield’s “Yellow River,” c. 1984, is an uncommon example of the artist’s work as the subject is in repose with an experimental minimalist aesthetic. Created using scrap metal from a school bus, the painted steel elements seem to combine organically. Butterfield is widely recognized for her materials-oriented approach to sculpture. 
<br>
<br>Deborah Butterfield's work is included in numerous museum collections, including the Honolulu Museum of Art, the Rockwell Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Delaware Art Museum, the Boise Art Museum, the Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art, the Neuberger Museum of Art, and the Rockford Art Museum among many others. In the 1970s, Butterfield made her first horses from plaster, papier-mâché, and mud and sticks. In 1980, she traveled to Israel on a John Simon Guggenheim grant, and worked with steel and other detritus of wars, and determined the material held emotional content. This set her on a course of making horses with found and welded steel, fused aluminum, copper, and wood — materials that also have a history. Butterfield’s “Yellow River,” c. 1984, is an uncommon example of the artist’s work as the subject is in repose with an experimental minimalist aesthetic. Created using scrap metal from a school bus, the painted steel elements seem to combine organically. Butterfield is widely recognized for her materials-oriented approach to sculpture. 
<br>
<br>Deborah Butterfield's work is included in numerous museum collections, including the Honolulu Museum of Art, the Rockwell Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Delaware Art Museum, the Boise Art Museum, the Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art, the Neuberger Museum of Art, and the Rockford Art Museum among many others.
Yellow Riverc. 198426 x 96 x 56 in. steel
Provenance
Private Collection, California
Private Collection, Colorado
In the 1970s, Butterfield made her first horses from plaster, papier-mâché, and mud and sticks. In 1980, she traveled to Israel on a John Simon Guggenheim grant, and worked with steel and other detritus of wars, and determined the material held emotional content. This set her on a course of making horses with found and welded steel, fused aluminum, copper, and wood — materials that also have a history. Butterfield’s “Yellow River,” c. 1984, is an uncommon example of the artist’s work as the subject is in repose with an experimental minimalist aesthetic. Created using scrap metal from a school bus, the painted steel elements seem to combine organically. Butterfield is widely recognized for her materials-oriented approach to sculpture.

Deborah Butterfield's work is included in numerous museum collections, including the Honolulu Museum of Art, the Rockwell Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Delaware Art Museum, the Boise Art Museum, the Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art, the Neuberger Museum of Art, and the Rockford Art Museum among many others.
Inquire

Similar Artworks

Deborah Butterfield is an American sculptor, best known for her sculptures of horses made of objects ranging from wood, metal, and other found objects. The 1981 piece, Untitled (Horse), is comprised of sticks and paper on wire armature. The impressive scale of this piece creates a remarkable effect in person, presenting a striking example of Butterfield's celebrated subject matter. Butterfield originally created the horses from wood and other materials found on her property in Bozeman, Montana and saw the horses as a metaphorical self-portrait, mining the emotional resonance of these forms.

DEBORAH BUTTERFIELD

Alex Katz is a pivotal figure in American figurative art. His colorful, stylized, flat portraiture and paintings stand in stark contrast to the Abstract Expressionism in which he came of age. Not quite minimalist, his deadpan figures have qualities that also lends comparisons to pop culture and commercial design. This painting of a man playing the ukulele highlights the sort of gatherings of young people that would interest Katz giving both the sense of cool detachment but also cool hipness.

ALEX KATZ

More than an artist, Theaster Gates also works as curator, urban planner, and project facilitator. From sculpture to painting, installation to public projects, Gates’s works are hubs in which to question labor and commodity while also bringing to the fore people and things that are often unseen and unheard. Convex Concave takes custom-made bricks that Gates had previously used for Black Vessel for a Saint at the Walker Art Center and repurposes it into a painting-like sculpture that references minimalist artist like Sol LeWitt, the labor of making bricks, and the original context of the bricks for the installation at the Walker.

THEASTER GATES

THEASTER GATES - Lathe Black Box - wood, glass and lathe - 50 1/4 x 53 x 6 7/8 in.

THEASTER GATES

WILLIAM MORRIS - Artifact Pouch - blown glass - 20 x 20 x 20 in.

WILLIAM MORRIS

CINDY SHERMAN - Untitled - color photograph - 34 x 23 1/4 in.

CINDY SHERMAN

HASSEL SMITH - Untitled - acrylic on canvas - 84 x 108 1/4 in.

HASSEL SMITH

HASSEL SMITH - Homage to the Headhunters - acrylic on canvas - 68 x 68 in.

HASSEL SMITH

ALEX KATZ - Untitled - oil on masonite - 11 7/8 x 15 3/4 in.

ALEX KATZ

PETER SHELTON - Whitebagbone - mixed media - 86 x 22 x 18 in.

PETER SHELTON

THEASTER GATES - Untitled (flooring) - white cement, debris, flooring - 35 x 35 x 3 in.

THEASTER GATES

HASSEL SMITH - Untitled - acrylic on canvas - 68 x 48 in.

HASSEL SMITH

PETER SHELTON - noarm. - plastic and acrylic - 45 x 15 3/4 x 8 in.

PETER SHELTON

TONY DE LOS REYES - The Needle - oil on linen - 89 x 119 x 6 in.

TONY DE LOS REYES

RUSSELL YOUNG - Wave - indigo pigment screenprint on felt in 6 panels - 74 x 120 in.

RUSSELL YOUNG

PETER SHELTON - whitebeard - 41 x 7 x 6 1/2 in.

PETER SHELTON

JEFF KOONS - Girl with Lobster - color digital ditone print - 29 1/4 x 24 in.

JEFF KOONS

ERIC JON HOLSWADE - Bird's Eye View - oil, flashe & gouache on cardboard - 65 x 78 in.

ERIC JON HOLSWADE

TIMOTHY TOMPKINS - Jungle v.1 - commercial enamel on aluminum - 48 x 80 in.

TIMOTHY TOMPKINS

Provenance: 
<br>Imago Galleries, CA
<br>Private collection, CA (acquired from above)

STEVEN MCCALLUM

GUSTAVE HEINZE - Store Front #122 - acrylic on masonite - 40 x 40 in.

GUSTAVE HEINZE

SIDDHARTH PARASNIS - Cityscape - oil on canvas - 48 x 48 in.

SIDDHARTH PARASNIS

CHRIS TRUEMAN - ZS - acrylic and acrylic spray paint on canvas - 36 x 38 3/4 in.

CHRIS TRUEMAN

WILLIAM T. WILEY - It's Only a Pay Per Moon - lithograph and woodcut additions on chamois - 47 3/4 x 38 in.

WILLIAM T. WILEY

LAWRENCE LEE - There by Flight - India Ink, graphite, tea stains, pen and watercolor on paper - 32 x 32 in.

LAWRENCE LEE

WILLIAM WEGMAN - Marigolds, Flying Puppy - photograph on paper - 9 x 9 in.

WILLIAM WEGMAN