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PERLE FINE (1905-1988)

 
Perle Fine was chosen by her peers to be included in the seminal 1951 Ninth Street Show. She also participated from 1951 to 1957 in the invitational New York Painting and Sculpture Annuals. She was one of the 24 artists (from 156 New York School artists) to be included in all of the Annuals – Grace Hartigan, Joan Mitchell, and Elaine de Kooning were among the other 24.
<br>
<br>The title of this piece references Marcel Duchamp's Modernist classic, "Nude Descending a Staircase" from 1912, which combined cconcerns of Cubism and Futurism in an artistic tradition of analyzing motion via photography. The subject of this painting may relate to the 1958 Whitney show, "Nature in Abstraction: The Relation of Abstract Painting and Sculpture to Nature in 20th-Century Art," of which her work was a part.
<br>
<br>For Fine "Abstract Expressionism had never been a form of open rebellion against earlier styles, but rather a beautiful, unexplored country." 
<br>- Housley, Kathleen L. (January 1, 2003). "The Tranquil Power of Perle Fine's Art". Woman's Art Journal. 24 (1): 3–10. Perle Fine was chosen by her peers to be included in the seminal 1951 Ninth Street Show. She also participated from 1951 to 1957 in the invitational New York Painting and Sculpture Annuals. She was one of the 24 artists (from 156 New York School artists) to be included in all of the Annuals – Grace Hartigan, Joan Mitchell, and Elaine de Kooning were among the other 24.
<br>
<br>The title of this piece references Marcel Duchamp's Modernist classic, "Nude Descending a Staircase" from 1912, which combined cconcerns of Cubism and Futurism in an artistic tradition of analyzing motion via photography. The subject of this painting may relate to the 1958 Whitney show, "Nature in Abstraction: The Relation of Abstract Painting and Sculpture to Nature in 20th-Century Art," of which her work was a part.
<br>
<br>For Fine "Abstract Expressionism had never been a form of open rebellion against earlier styles, but rather a beautiful, unexplored country." 
<br>- Housley, Kathleen L. (January 1, 2003). "The Tranquil Power of Perle Fine's Art". Woman's Art Journal. 24 (1): 3–10. Perle Fine was chosen by her peers to be included in the seminal 1951 Ninth Street Show. She also participated from 1951 to 1957 in the invitational New York Painting and Sculpture Annuals. She was one of the 24 artists (from 156 New York School artists) to be included in all of the Annuals – Grace Hartigan, Joan Mitchell, and Elaine de Kooning were among the other 24.
<br>
<br>The title of this piece references Marcel Duchamp's Modernist classic, "Nude Descending a Staircase" from 1912, which combined cconcerns of Cubism and Futurism in an artistic tradition of analyzing motion via photography. The subject of this painting may relate to the 1958 Whitney show, "Nature in Abstraction: The Relation of Abstract Painting and Sculpture to Nature in 20th-Century Art," of which her work was a part.
<br>
<br>For Fine "Abstract Expressionism had never been a form of open rebellion against earlier styles, but rather a beautiful, unexplored country." 
<br>- Housley, Kathleen L. (January 1, 2003). "The Tranquil Power of Perle Fine's Art". Woman's Art Journal. 24 (1): 3–10. Perle Fine was chosen by her peers to be included in the seminal 1951 Ninth Street Show. She also participated from 1951 to 1957 in the invitational New York Painting and Sculpture Annuals. She was one of the 24 artists (from 156 New York School artists) to be included in all of the Annuals – Grace Hartigan, Joan Mitchell, and Elaine de Kooning were among the other 24.
<br>
<br>The title of this piece references Marcel Duchamp's Modernist classic, "Nude Descending a Staircase" from 1912, which combined cconcerns of Cubism and Futurism in an artistic tradition of analyzing motion via photography. The subject of this painting may relate to the 1958 Whitney show, "Nature in Abstraction: The Relation of Abstract Painting and Sculpture to Nature in 20th-Century Art," of which her work was a part.
<br>
<br>For Fine "Abstract Expressionism had never been a form of open rebellion against earlier styles, but rather a beautiful, unexplored country." 
<br>- Housley, Kathleen L. (January 1, 2003). "The Tranquil Power of Perle Fine's Art". Woman's Art Journal. 24 (1): 3–10. Perle Fine was chosen by her peers to be included in the seminal 1951 Ninth Street Show. She also participated from 1951 to 1957 in the invitational New York Painting and Sculpture Annuals. She was one of the 24 artists (from 156 New York School artists) to be included in all of the Annuals – Grace Hartigan, Joan Mitchell, and Elaine de Kooning were among the other 24.
<br>
<br>The title of this piece references Marcel Duchamp's Modernist classic, "Nude Descending a Staircase" from 1912, which combined cconcerns of Cubism and Futurism in an artistic tradition of analyzing motion via photography. The subject of this painting may relate to the 1958 Whitney show, "Nature in Abstraction: The Relation of Abstract Painting and Sculpture to Nature in 20th-Century Art," of which her work was a part.
<br>
<br>For Fine "Abstract Expressionism had never been a form of open rebellion against earlier styles, but rather a beautiful, unexplored country." 
<br>- Housley, Kathleen L. (January 1, 2003). "The Tranquil Power of Perle Fine's Art". Woman's Art Journal. 24 (1): 3–10. Perle Fine was chosen by her peers to be included in the seminal 1951 Ninth Street Show. She also participated from 1951 to 1957 in the invitational New York Painting and Sculpture Annuals. She was one of the 24 artists (from 156 New York School artists) to be included in all of the Annuals – Grace Hartigan, Joan Mitchell, and Elaine de Kooning were among the other 24.
<br>
<br>The title of this piece references Marcel Duchamp's Modernist classic, "Nude Descending a Staircase" from 1912, which combined cconcerns of Cubism and Futurism in an artistic tradition of analyzing motion via photography. The subject of this painting may relate to the 1958 Whitney show, "Nature in Abstraction: The Relation of Abstract Painting and Sculpture to Nature in 20th-Century Art," of which her work was a part.
<br>
<br>For Fine "Abstract Expressionism had never been a form of open rebellion against earlier styles, but rather a beautiful, unexplored country." 
<br>- Housley, Kathleen L. (January 1, 2003). "The Tranquil Power of Perle Fine's Art". Woman's Art Journal. 24 (1): 3–10. Perle Fine was chosen by her peers to be included in the seminal 1951 Ninth Street Show. She also participated from 1951 to 1957 in the invitational New York Painting and Sculpture Annuals. She was one of the 24 artists (from 156 New York School artists) to be included in all of the Annuals – Grace Hartigan, Joan Mitchell, and Elaine de Kooning were among the other 24.
<br>
<br>The title of this piece references Marcel Duchamp's Modernist classic, "Nude Descending a Staircase" from 1912, which combined cconcerns of Cubism and Futurism in an artistic tradition of analyzing motion via photography. The subject of this painting may relate to the 1958 Whitney show, "Nature in Abstraction: The Relation of Abstract Painting and Sculpture to Nature in 20th-Century Art," of which her work was a part.
<br>
<br>For Fine "Abstract Expressionism had never been a form of open rebellion against earlier styles, but rather a beautiful, unexplored country." 
<br>- Housley, Kathleen L. (January 1, 2003). "The Tranquil Power of Perle Fine's Art". Woman's Art Journal. 24 (1): 3–10.
Figure Descending a Ladder196042 x 48 in. oil on canvas
Provenance
Thomas McCormick Gallery, Chicago
Private Collection, Minnesota
Perle Fine was chosen by her peers to be included in the seminal 1951 Ninth Street Show. She also participated from 1951 to 1957 in the invitational New York Painting and Sculpture Annuals. She was one of the 24 artists (from 156 New York School artists) to be included in all of the Annuals – Grace Hartigan, Joan Mitchell, and Elaine de Kooning were among the other 24.

The title of this piece references Marcel Duchamp's Modernist classic, "Nude Descending a Staircase" from 1912, which combined cconcerns of Cubism and Futurism in an artistic tradition of analyzing motion via photography. The subject of this painting may relate to the 1958 Whitney show, "Nature in Abstraction: The Relation of Abstract Painting and Sculpture to Nature in 20th-Century Art," of which her work was a part.

For Fine "Abstract Expressionism had never been a form of open rebellion against earlier styles, but rather a beautiful, unexplored country."
- Housley, Kathleen L. (January 1, 2003). "The Tranquil Power of Perle Fine's Art". Woman's Art Journal. 24 (1): 3–10.
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