Palm Desert Gallery Walkthrough 2021

PUBLISHED IN:
AD REINHARDT - Abstract Painting, 1959 - oil on canvas - 108 x 40 in.

AD REINHARDT

CLAUDE MONET - L’Ancienne rue de la Chaussée, Argenteuil - oil on canvas - 18 1/4 x 25 7/8 in.

CLAUDE MONET

DIEGO RIVERA - Portrait of Enriqueta G. Dávila - oil on canvas - 79 1/8 x 48 3/8 in.

DIEGO RIVERA

WINSLOW HOMER - The Shepherdess - oil on canvas - 22 3/4 x 15 3/4 in.

WINSLOW HOMER

AGNES MARTIN - Untitled #11 - acrylic and graphite on canvas - 60 x 60 in.

AGNES MARTIN

JOAN MIRO - Oiseau, Insecte, Constellation - oil on canvas - 50 3/4 x 38 1/8 in.

JOAN MIRO

FRANCIS PICABIA - Lunis - oil on canvas - 25 1/2 x 20 1/2 in. .

FRANCIS PICABIA

Afternoon at the Beach depicts elegant young ladies with bonnets, as well as several children — two of which appear on a donkey — and an occasional male enjoying a day at the beach under striped parasols.  Female figures, flowers, and domestic interiors and exteriors were recurring elements in his paintings. Their fairly close tonalities reflect the deep influence that James Abbott McNeill Whistler had on Frieseke’s style. Here, Frieseke found his aesthetic and asserted his familiar theme.
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<br>Department store magnate Rodman Wanamaker commissioned the 15-foot-long painting for the Hotel Shelburne in Atlantic City. Frieseke designed it as a single composition in 1905, and completed it in segments in 1906. The painting was installed at the Hotel Shelburne in February 1906. 
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<br>In 2000 and 2001, Afternoon at the Beach was exhibited at the Telfair Museum of Art in Savannah, Georgia, during the 2000-2001 exhibition Frederick Carl Frieseke: The Evolution of an American Impressionist.

FREDERICK FRIESEKE

VINCENT VAN GOGH - Uitzicht over Den Haag met de Nieuwe Kerk - watercolor, gouache, and pen and brown ink on
paper - 9 7/8 x 14 1/16 in.

VINCENT VAN GOGH

CAMILLE PISSARRO - Le Quai de Pothuis a Pontoise - oil on canvas - 18 1/8 x 21 7/8 in.

CAMILLE PISSARRO

"...if a work of Sculpture has its own life and form, it will be alive and expansive, seeming larger than the stone or wood from which it is carved. It should always give the impression, whether carved or modeled, of having grown organically, created by pressure from within."
<br>-Henry Moore
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<br>"Reclining Figure: Circle" (1983) shows Moore's fascination with biomorphic abstraction, an approach he would have been drawn to in the work of his contemporaries, including Joan Miro and Jean Arp. Another example from this edition of nine is in the permanent collection of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

HENRY MOORE

JAMES ROSENQUIST - Television or the Cat's Cradle Supports Electronic Picture - acrylic on canvas over panel - 66 x 240 in.

JAMES ROSENQUIST

An exemplary work from Picasso’s Neo-Classical period, La communiante avec missel belongs to a rare series. Picasso revisited the theme of children receiving communion a few times and in a few styles, from this solemn classic version to the dynamic fragmentation of Cubism. A Neo-Classical example comparable to this piece is in the collection of the Musée Picasso in Paris.
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<br>While this time period after World War I saw many artists looking to tradition, a return to order as a reaction against the destruction of war, Picasso’s Neo-classicism was not so much a refuge, but a vehicle by which he could explore new themes and ideas. In La communiante avec missel, we see certain hallmarks of Picasso: the visual weight that the girl carries and the statuesque features of her face. These elements are softened by the curved lines the artist has used for her body and dress. In Picasso’s hands, the painting is a meditation of youth and religion marking the rites of passage.

PABLO PICASSO

ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG - Shuttle Buttle/ROCI USA (Wax Fire Works) - acrylic, fire wax, enamel, object on mirrored aluminum - 72 x 144 x 19 in.

ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG

Initially used as a frontispiece illustration for the 1914 novel, “The Witch,” by Mary Johnston, Wyeth’s painting presents a poignant scene of friendship and understanding between a grieving, independent woman and a generous, misunderstood doctor. Although the two hardly know each other, they have a shared understanding of and reverence for what is good. While the rest of the town searches for the devil in all things, these two choose kindness and light. Here, they take a moment to appreciate the lives they have led and the good they have done. Wyeth’s illustration depicts hope and expectation of good despite the perils and sorrows of human life.
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<br>In addition to illustrating more than 100 books, including adventure classics like Treasure Island, Kidnapped, Robinson Crusoe, and The Last of the Mohicans, Wyeth was also a highly regarded muralist, receiving numerous commissions for prestigious corporate and government buildings throughout the United States. Wyeth’s style, honed by early work at the Saturday Evening Post and Scribner’s, demonstrates his keen awareness of the revealing gesture, allowing readers to instantly grasp the essence of a scene.

N.C. WYETH

ADOLPH GOTTLIEB - Azimuth - oil on canvas - 95 3/4 x 144 1/4 in.

ADOLPH GOTTLIEB

The Japanese Nio, or “benevolent kings,” are figures that were placed outside Buddhist temples, on each side of the entrance, to ward off evil spirits, demons, and thieves from the late Muromachi to early Edo periods — or roughly 1467 to 1652.
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<br>The Nio are Indian in origin — manifestations of Vajrapani Bodhisattvas. By some accounts, they protected the Buddha when he traveled throughout India. 
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<br>These figures are approximately 500 years old, according to carbon-14 dating conducted on the objects. They were once installed in a famous home that was photographed for the cover of a Frank Lloyd Wright book.
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<br>Each figure is named after a cosmic sound. The closed-mouth figure is Ungyo, who utters “un” or “om,” meaning death. He is also called Nareen Kongo and is said to be a form of the Indian god Vishnu. With his tightly closed mouth and tensed both arms, he represents latent might. The open-mouthed partner is Misshaku Kongo (Agyo), who sounds “ah,” meaning birth. He is equated to the Indian deity Vajrapani, whose name means “thunderbolt holder.” He bares his teeth, raises his fist, and holds a Kongosho, which is a symbol of the power he represents. 
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<br>The Nio are constructed in the traditional multi-block design. Old works were conventionally repaired bit by bit, over time, as individual blocks shrank at different rates or were damaged by insects. Damaged blocks were removed, like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle, and replaced with exact copies of the piece. It is common to find figures with repairs spanning many years, as is the case with these particular pieces. This pair was originally lacquered. Though none of the lacquer survives, there is evidence of the gesso-like layer on the surface of each figure. 
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<br>It is interesting to note that this pair — each figure standing 71 inches tall — is a close copy of the Nio guarding the south gate of the Todaiji in Japan. However, the Todaiji pair, completed in 1203, stands 26 feet tall.
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<br>In both examples, the classic, fierce and threatening expressions punctuate their purpose as protectors of the Buddhist temple.

JAPANESE

TAKASHI MURAKAMI - Want to Hold You - acrylic on canvas - 59 x 59  in.

TAKASHI MURAKAMI

By the late 1950's, Henry Moore began experimenting with the theme of seated figures set against a wall backdrop.  "Girl Seated Against Square Wall" (1957-1958) is one of eleven sculptures in the "Wall" series; each sculpture varies according to the position and number of figures depicted. These works show a diorama-like depiction of the subject and are widely recognized as an important part of the artist's oeuvre.  
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<br>Moore's constant innovation and experimentation with his subject is why he is considered one of the great masters of the 20th Century. Another "Girl Seated Against Square Wall" (1957-1958)" can be found in the permanent collection of the Norton Simon Museum, Pasadena, California.

HENRY MOORE

JAMES ROSENQUIST - Samba School - oil on canvas over panel - 78 x 132 in.

JAMES ROSENQUIST

GEORGIA O'KEEFFE - Canna Lily - watercolor on paper - 22 x 13 in.

GEORGIA O'KEEFFE

CAMILLE PISSARRO - Le Pere Melon Fendant du Bois - gouache on linen - 12 5/8 X 9 3/4 in.

CAMILLE PISSARRO

Among the most desirable subjects in Moore's oeuvre are his Family Groups.  The theme was first explored in a 1922 stone sculpture and evolved into a public commission from the British government prior to World War II. After the war, the subject was revisited as the message of rebuilding strong families was critical to the British people's recovery.
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<br>"Family Group" (1945) documents the optimisim and hope of Post-War Europe in sculptural form. The young family depicted shows the rebirth of the British people after one of the darkest eras in human history.

HENRY MOORE

MAX PECHSTEIN - Damenbildnis (Charlotte Pechstein) - oil on canvas - 29 1/2 x 23 1/2 in.

MAX PECHSTEIN

Irving Norman's masterpiece, "The Human Condition," from 1980, draws upon the artist's lifetime of acquired experiences and knowledge. Surviving as a volunteer fighter during the Spanish Civil War, the artist returned to the United States after the loyalist defeat. Upon his return, fervent studio practice in Half Moon Bay, California, would become his life's devotion.  
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<br>The present work, a nearly 16-foot-wide triptych, is reminiscent of Hieronymus Bosch's triptych, "The Garden of Earthly Delights," c. 1510.  The dystopian vision portrayed in 'The Human Condition" is a warning - a lesson from the European dictatorships Norman experienced firsthand during the 1930s.   Disturbing tableaus show the darkness of humanity and the evil that can rise to prominence when humanity is at its worst.  There is hope, however, in the experience of the viewer: Norman thought of his audience as the greatest hope for humankind.

IRVING NORMAN

Françoise Gilot was Picasso's muse and lover for nearly a decade beginning in 1946, the year he created this drawing. She became an iconic recurring image in the artist's work, reinvigorating his practice with a sense of joy after the dark period of World War II, and many of these portraits remained in his collection for the rest of his life. Picasso often drew Gilot from memory, thereby rendering her as more of a symbol or an ideal than as a model. As Michael Fitzgerald notes, “Picasso's portraits of Françoise were not drawn from life…unlike in the cases of Picasso's other wives and mistresses, there are almost none that reproduce her features strictly" (Michael Fitzgerald, "A Triangle of Ambitions: Art, Politics, and Family during the Postwar Years with Françoise Gilot," in Picasso and Portraiture, London, 1996, p. 416). On the significance of Gilot to this period for Picasso, Frank Elgar writes, "the portraits of Françoise Gilot have a Madonna-like appearance, in contrast to the tormented figures he was painting a few years earlier" (Frank Elgar, Picasso, New York, 1972, p. 123).

PABLO PICASSO

WINSLOW HOMER - Towing the Boat - watercolor and pencil on paper - 6 1/2 x 11 1/4 in.

WINSLOW HOMER

Carl Andre’s floor sculptures are typically made from glowing tiles of lead, zinc, or copper. They differ from most other minimalist artwork in their accessibility: they are meant to be walked on. Art historically, Andre places himself in the lineage of Constantin Brancusi and Henry Moore. Andre continues in their tradition of reducing the vocabulary of sculpture to its most vital and simple forms. The works also speak to Donald Judd’s idea of “specific objects,” which emphasized the phenomenological experience of the viewer and an exploration of structure and space.

CARL ANDRE

FRANK STELLA - Untitled - three dimensional mixed media on board, mounted on wood - 43 x 128 x 12 in.

FRANK STELLA

At the start of the 20th century, Granville Redmond traveled to Arizona and New Mexico to paint scenes for the Santa Fe Railroad. This painting depicts an expansive desert landscape with two Native Americans at a campfire. A Los Angeles Herald journalist who visited Redmond's studio in 1903 called this painting a “jewel set in dull gold.”
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<br>"The Evening Desert" is included in the 2020 exhibition at the Crocker Art Museum: "Granville Redmond: The Eloquent Palette." It is the largest retrospective of Redmond’s work ever assembled and the first retrospective for the artist in over 30 years.

GRANVILLE REDMOND

Julian Schnabel is an American painter whose style is associated with the Neo-Expressionist movement of the 1980s. Pascin Pig Passin Time is part of Schnabel’s broken plate series of paintings, inspired by the trencadís, or broken tile mosaic, of architect Antoni Gaudí. With a humorous title and depicting his first wife, Jacqueline Beaurang, the broken ceramics give Schnabel an assertive and textural surface in which to create large-scale works that captured the brash and audacious period of the 1980s.

JULIAN SCHNABEL

FERNAND LEGER - Le Vase Bleu - oil on canvas - 15 x 18 in.

FERNAND LEGER

"The Ash Blonde" (1918) has remained in the same private collection for nearly 30 years. A superb portraitist, Childe Hassam expertly captures the emotion and character of his subject in the present work. The sitter's facial expression is depicted with an accuracy and nuanced attention to detail that is reminiscent of the Dutch Old Masters, specifically Rembrandt. Painted just one year after his seminal masterpiece in the White House collection, "The Avenue in the Rain" (1917), this portrait is a brilliant counterpoint to the artist's cityscapes.  
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<br>Hassam is represented in numerous museum collections, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, The National Gallery in Washington, D.C., The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and The Brooklyn Museum.

CHILDE HASSAM

Gabriel Orozco is one of the preeminent artists working today. A native Mexican, Orozco gained initial recognition in the 1990s through his artistic creations across a wide range of media, including sculpture, drawing, photography, and installation works. Orozco had a significant mid-career traveling retrospective that ended in 2011 at the Tate Modern. He is widely regarded as one of the most innovative artists of our time.
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<br>“Samurai Tree - Invariant Gold 2” (2005) is part of the “Samurai Tree” series, the genesis of which was an exploration into the geometry of the circle in drawings Orozco produced on graph paper before 2004.  
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<br>“I thought that by establishing some rules, I could build up a structure that behaves like a sculpture,” says the artist, “so it’s a flat mobile maybe, or it’s a diagram that’s rotating and moving. And behaving not like a painting, in a way.”

GABRIEL OROZCO

"Lions on the Dreyfus Fund, Inc." demonstrates Rivers's Pop Art aesthetic through its repetition of imagery and a well-known corporate brand of the time. The lion forms featured prominently in the painting were a logo for the Dreyfus fund, as well as art historical symbols in their own right. Rivers would have at least seen pictures of the ancient archetypes for such imagery as the "Ishtar Gate" from 575 B.C. in what is now the country of Iraq. Rivers's love of travel and exploration brought him to Africa for seven months, where he would have been able to study a diverse menagerie for his artwork firsthand.    
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<br>Another version of the painting, "Lions on the Dreyfus Fund III" (1964) is in the permanent collection of the Art Institute of Chicago.

LARRY RIVERS

Born on July 29, 1950, in Gallipolis, OH, Holzer received her BFA from Ohio University in 1972 and her MFA from the Rhode Island School of Design in 1975. The artist fully embraces sculpture and mixed media works, seamlessly shifting from her monumental "word displays" to more intimate works such as "Survival: Hide under water…" (1989).  
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<br>Holzer's use of the red granite medium reframes the conversation about works of art in stone, a medium traditionally associated with antiquity and classical sculpture. The inclusion of typography and wordplay in this medium recalls a theme in Holzer's oeuvre, such as her renowned "Truisms" series, and expands the potential of language in art. Holzer is included in countless museum collections worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art,  New York, where her "Granite Bench" (1986) is featured prominently in their sculpture garden.

JENNY HOLZER

Françoise Gilot was Picasso's muse and lover for nearly a decade beginning in 1946, the year he created this drawing. She became an iconic recurring image in the artist's work, reinvigorating his practice with a sense of joy after the dark period of World War II, and many of these portraits remained in his collection for the rest of his life. Picasso often drew Gilot from memory, thereby rendering her as more of a symbol or an ideal than as a model. As Michael Fitzgerald notes, “Picasso's portraits of Françoise were not drawn from life…unlike in the cases of Picasso's other wives and mistresses, there are almost none that reproduce her features strictly" (Michael Fitzgerald, "A Triangle of Ambitions: Art, Politics, and Family during the Postwar Years with Françoise Gilot," in Picasso and Portraiture, London, 1996, p. 416). On the significance of Gilot to this period for Picasso, Frank Elgar writes, "the portraits of Françoise Gilot have a Madonna-like appearance, in contrast to the tormented figures he was painting a few years earlier" (Frank Elgar, Picasso, New York, 1972, p. 123).

PABLO PICASSO

A major figure in both the Abstract Expressionist and American Figurative Expressionist movements of the 1940s and 1950s, Elaine de Kooning's prolific output defied singular categorization. Her versatile styles explored the spectrum of realism to abstraction, resulting in a career characterized by intense expression and artistic boundary-pushing. A striking example of de Kooning's explosive creativity is Untitled (Totem Pole), an extremely rare sculptural painting by the artist that showcases her command of color. 
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<br>She created this piece around 1960, the same period as her well-known bullfight paintings. She left New York in 1957 to begin teaching at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, and from there would visit Ciudad Juárez, where she observed the bullfights that inspired her work. An avid traveler, de Kooning drew inspiration from various sources, resulting in a diverse and experimental body of work.

ELAINE DE KOONING

Elaine de Kooning was commissioned to paint JFK in 1962 for the Truman Library. The present work, "Study of John F. Kennedy" (1963), is one of several studies stemming from her work toward the official portrait. She spent several sessions with Kennedy in Palm Beach, creating many drawings and paintings to capture his likeness. The final portrait is now in the National Portrait Gallery at the Smithsonian.
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<br>This charcoal on canvas remained in the artist's collection until her passing in 1989. Although several smaller black and white studies exist, they are primarily bust-length and smaller in scale. This fully realized study captures the character of the JFK with a sense of dignity and immediacy.  
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<br>Illustrated in "Elaine de Kooning: Portraits," this monumental work would fit comfortably in a museum's permanent collection.

ELAINE DE KOONING

The only known extant Diebenkorn sculpture, this welded iron form is a brilliant example of his artistic development and the creative energy of his early work. 
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<br>This rare sculpture comes from a period of experimentation and a burst of lyrical creativity that the artist experienced while in graduate school at the University of New Mexico. It was likely included in his 1951 Master's Degree Exhibition at that institution. Like many American artists before him, Diebenkorn was enthralled with the atmosphere and landscape of the Southwest. He produced energetic and unpredictable canvases with bold, warm colors, barely contained within their underlying geometric structure. This iron sculpture demonstrates the far reaches of the artist’s exploration, establishing the essential linear framework that would come to characterize his later work. 
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<br>This piece was the only sculpture included in the 2008 exhibition "Diebenkorn in New Mexico" at the UNM Harwood Museum of Art in Taos. Since his first retrospective in 1976 at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, New York, Diebenkorn has found a place in over 50 museum collections worldwide and is recognized as a major creative force of the 20th Century.

RICHARD DIEBENKORN

Gottlieb was a first-generation member of the Abstract Expressionists. “Blue on Black” is from his trademark “Burst” series. Like fellow Ab Ex artists including Pollock who settled into their signature style late in their careers, it was not until 1956 that Gottlieb focused on these burst paintings.
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<br>This painting showcases the lyricism that he found within the “Burst” paintings by simplifying color and form. In this painting, the shapes and color coalesce to produce harmony and depth within the visual landscape of the canvas.
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<br>Gottlieb had an amazing 56 solo exhibitions during his long career and his works are included in over 140 museums throughout the world.

ADOLPH GOTTLIEB

This "Untitled" enamel painting by David Hammons is a precursor to the artist’s famous body prints of the late 1960s and ‘70s, as well as compelling recent works. The painting was completed just before Hammons enrolled at the Chouinard Institute in Los Angeles (now CalArts). By this time, Hammons had studied with the realist activist Charles White and was influenced by the found-object assemblages of Dada, the humble materials of Arte Povera, and the politically charged imagery of the Black Arts Movement. For his body prints, Hammons created life-sized representations of his own body by slicking himself with margarine, baby oil, and other greasy substances, and pressing himself against surfaces, creating imagery in which viewers can discern the face and clothes of the artist.
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<br>After moving to New York City in 1974, Hammons partook in assemblage, installation, and performance work but, in recent years, he has returned to the two-dimensional support. In his "Kool-Aid" series, the sumptuously colored and fluid style seen in this early enamel painting reappears, and in his "Basketball" series, dark smudges are the product of a basketball dribbled on the paper support. Poured enamel and cheap powdered drink, dribbled balls covered in “Harlem dirt”, and the press of a body against support all are inflected by chance. Fugitive materiality recurs in Hammons practice, nuancing his political commentary on the African American experience.

DAVID HAMMONS

Deborah Butterfield is an American sculptor, best known for her sculptures of horses made of objects ranging from wood, metal, and other found objects. The 1981 piece, Untitled (Horse), is comprised of sticks and paper on wire armature. The impressive scale of this piece creates a remarkable effect in person, presenting a striking example of Butterfield's celebrated subject matter. Butterfield originally created the horses from wood and other materials found on her property in Bozeman, Montana and saw the horses as a metaphorical self-portrait, mining the emotional resonance of these forms.

DEBORAH BUTTERFIELD

Mercedes Matter was an original member of the American Abstract Artists and an influential figure in the Abstract Expressionist movement. Alongside many of her fellow AbEx colleagues like Helen Frankenthaler and Lee Krasner, Matter studied under Hans Hoffman. The market for works by the historically undervalued AbEx women is increasing tremendously as their contributions to the movement gain overdue recognition. 
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<br>"Untitled" (1954-1955) comes from the height of the Abstract Expressionist movement. This painting is an explosive composition that demonstrates Matter's command of color and movement.

MERCEDES MATTER

As a member of the legendary Gutai Art Association that flourished between 1954 and 1972, Sadamasa Motonaga emerged when post-atomic surrealist existentialism was at the forefront of artistic development in Japan. Yet he chose a different path. He turned his back on the destruction wrought by the war and created work that was fresh, jubilant, and playful. “Untitled” of 1966 is in his classic style, which developed concurrently with Morris Louis’ so-called ‘Veil’ paintings. It might suggest the brightly lit comb, eye and mottled plumage of a gallinaceous bird, but any such associations are probably arbitrary and unintended. Instead, it is a brilliantly successful display of Motonaga’s avant-garde take on traditional Japanese Tarashikomi — the technique that involves tilting the canvas at different angles to allow mixtures of resin and enamel to flow upon one another before the paint is fully dry.

SADAMASA MOTONAGA

N.C. WYETH - With a Quick, Noiseless Stride, He Crossed the Narrow Space - oil on canvas - 30 1/4 x 20 1/8 in.

N.C. WYETH

Gabriel Orozco’s body of work is multidimensional, reaching across the media of painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, and installation. Born in Mexico in 1962, he attended the Escuela Nacional de Artes Plásticas at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City, and then studied at the Círculo de Bellas Artes in Madrid. A blend of inspirations is evident in his work, from Conceptualism and the readymades of Marcel Duchamp to the artistic traditions of Mexico. Often pairing found objects with unusual arrangements and geometric patterns, Orozco studies the relationship of everyday objects to human beings. 
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<br>Orozco’s series centering on athletics, games, and gambling explore entertainment and leisure activities through images clipped from newspapers, overlayed with neatly arranged circles and semicircles. The art historical lineage of these geometric interventions can be traced to the groundbreaking abstraction of Kazimir Malevich or the playful appropriation of John Baldessari. Orozco’s brightly colored patterns, often dictated by mathematical formula, interrupt a familiar format and challenge the viewer’s expectations – a theme paralleled in many of his interactive installation pieces. 
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<br>Orozco’s work has been included in the Venice Biennale, the Whitney Biennial, and in solo exhibitions at the most prestigious institutions worldwide, including the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York, The Museum of Modern Art New York, the Musée d’art moderne de la Ville de Paris, Museo Nacional Centre de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C. and many others. The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, presented a solo exhibition of Orozco’s work in 2000. Three of the six variations of Orozco’s “UK. Athletics II” were featured in that exhibition.

GABRIEL OROZCO

Fernando Botero, best known for his voluptuously rotund human figures, was born in Medellín, Colombia on April 19, 1932. He held his first solo exhibition in 1951 in Bogota at the age of 19 and made enough money to travel to Spain where he studied at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando in Madrid. 
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<br>While studying painting in Madrid in the early 1950s, Botero made his living by copying paintings housed in the Prado Museum—particularly those of his idols at the time, Francisco de Goya and Diego Velázquez—and selling them to tourists. 
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<br>In "Dibujo a la Manera de Velasquez" (1960), Botero appears to be riffing on Velázquez's "El bufón don Diego de Acedo," one of the renowned Spanish painter's portraits of jesters and "men of pleasure" painted to decorate the royal palaces. That painting has been in the Prado Museum in Madrid, Spain, since 1819.

FERNANDO BOTERO

‘… it took the experience of working with radical kinds of symmetry, not just a rectangle, but a diamond shape, as well as extreme extensions of shapes, before I finally came to the idea of everything being unbalanced, nothing vertical, nothing horizontal, nothing parallel. I came to the fact that unbalancing has its own order. In a peculiar way, it can still end up feeling symmetrical. I don’t know but what the very nature of our response to art is experienced symmetrically' (K. Noland, quoted in D. Waldman, ‘Color, Format and Abstract Art’, in Art in America, vol. 65, no. 3, May–June 1977, pp. 99–105).
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<br>Kenneth Noland's shaped canvas works were a natural artistic evolution from his condensed circular "target" style paintings of the late 1950s. With a keen sense of spatial relationships and geometric harmony, Noland involves the irregularly shaped canvas itself as a vehicle for his painting, "Set 1979" (1979).  
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<br>First appearing in 1975, the shaped canvas works are a counterpoint to the rigid and formal geometric works by Ellsworth Kelly and Max Bill. The Guggenheim Museum mounted an ambitious Kenneth Noland retrospective in 1977, just two years before creating "Set 1979." "Kenneth Noland: A Retrospective" was an important success for Noland; the show traveled to the Hirshorn Museum and the Corcoran Gallery of Art as well as the Toledo Museum of Art in Ohio.

KENNETH NOLAND

ALEXANDER CALDER - Woman with Square Umbrella - wood - 19 x 6 x 6 in.

ALEXANDER CALDER

Known as a Postmodern and Conceptual painter, photographer, and sculptor, Christopher Wool is best known for his word paintings with stenciled black letters on white canvases. He began working in this style in the late 1980s, a particularly innovative and formative period for the artist. In the early ‘80s, Wool worked as a studio assistant to sculptor Joel Shapiro, and in 1988, he collaborated with Richard Prince.  
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<br>“Untitled (T8)” exemplifies Wool's work from the late ‘80s exploring repetition through decorative black patterns. He typically used incised rollers or rubber stamps to create his floral and “grille-like” patterns resembling wallpaper, bringing the ordinary into the realm of conceptual art and rejecting composition and color. In 1986, Jeff Koons wrote that Wool’s work “contains continual internal/external debate within itself.

CHRISTOPHER WOOL

ANSELM KIEFER - Jericho - emulsion, acrylic, sand, clay and photographic paper on cardboard - 25 x 17 1/2 x 2.25 in.

ANSELM KIEFER

HERB ALPERT - Arrowhead - bronze - 201 x 48 x 48 in.

HERB ALPERT

HERB ALPERT - Freedom - bronze - 201 x 48 x 48 in.

HERB ALPERT

ZAHA HADID - Untitled - metal and plexiglass - 35 3/4 x 16 1/4 x 16 1/4 in.

ZAHA HADID

Mel Ramos is best known for his paintings of superheroes and female nudes juxtaposed with pop culture imagery. Ramos’s Peek-A-Boo portfolio is a well-known series by the artist, positioning the viewer to observe the pin-up girl figures through a keyhole shape surrounded by black. The series is noted for the confident and direct gazes of its subjects as well as the commentary it provides on the sexualization of a traditional art historical motif: the nude female figure. Alongside fellow Pop artists like Andy Warhol, James Rosenquist, and friend Roy Lichtenstein, Ramos provided a visual language for audiences to understand and experience the proliferation of commercial images that exploded in post-war America.

MEL RAMOS

Ed Ruscha is one of the most distinguished American artists due in part for his explorations of the symbols of Americana and the relationship between language and art. The End is a cinematic theme that the artist used in the 1990s and 2000s, appearing in paintings, prints, and drawings – notably the 1991 large-scale painting at the Museum of Modern Art. Addressing the passage of time and obsolescence, Ruscha makes use of an antiquated typeface and an old cinematic tradition of using text in film. The concept of ephemerality is enhanced by the words themselves, The End, and the nature of the medium itself; considered futuristic when it was developed in the 1960s, the laser technology for holograms also creates a sense of impermanence as the images change with the viewer’s movement. While there is innate movement in the shifting words and images, these holograms also represent a full stop – a transitory moment frozen in time.

ED RUSCHA

DAVID NOVROS - BARRANCA I - acrylic on canvas - 99 1/4 x 117 1/2 in.

DAVID NOVROS

ROBERTO MATTA - Untitled - oil on canvas - 34 3/8 x 42 1/2 in.

ROBERTO MATTA

NATHAN OLIVEIRA - Nude Stepping from the Carpet - oil on canvas - 52 x 48 in.

NATHAN OLIVEIRA

GEORGE SEGAL - Girl on Red Chair - plaster, wood and acrylic - 43 1/4  38 x 31 in.

GEORGE SEGAL

Contemporary American artist George Condo coined the term “artificial realism” to characterize the figures that appear in his work – often described as a combination of European Old Master painting and American Pop art. Condo has defined the term as the “realistic representation of that which is artificial.” Known for figures that are often grotesque or fractured, Condo creates art that is both Contemporary and rooted in art historical tradition, drawing inspiration from Cubism or, in this case, reaching back to ancient Greece. In an uncommon work of sculpture, Condo imparts his distinctive style to the face of a Mycenaean archetype, the goddess figure.

GEORGE CONDO

Alexander Calder's earliest works were composed of simple found objects, primarily metal and wood. It was not until later in his career that he would construct his monumentally scaled Stabiles and Mobiles. Eclat revisits the simple forms from his early years and the Surrealist style that influenced his work. Roughly translated as "sparkle," the work is symbolic of the sun, the universal symbol of light and life. The sun was also a favored symbol of the early surrealists, from which Calder drew significant inspiration.
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<br>"Eclat" (1974) retains the vibrant color Calder envisioned for the gouache. It is uncommon for yellow pigments and red pigments to remain in such a well-preserved state.

ALEXANDER CALDER

HERB ALPERT - Illumination - bronze - 159 x 40 x 40 in.

HERB ALPERT

HERB ALPERT - Radiance - bronze - 161 x 40 x 40 in.

HERB ALPERT

NATHAN OLIVEIRA - Figure #4 - bronze - 40 x 21 1/2 x 30 in.

NATHAN OLIVEIRA

Afternoon Tea on the Terrace (1905-1906) was commissioned by Rodman Wanamaker as part of a mural for the Grand Deluxe Shelburn hotel in Atlantic City. The mural was later divided into seven pieces that were displayed in the hotel dining room. Frieseke’s earliest mural work was for his patron, Rodman Wanamaker. Other commissions included mural decorations that were installed in Wanamaer’s New York department store in 1904 and 1907, the Rodman Wanamaker Hotel in 1905, and the Amphitheater of Music in New York in 1908. Art historians credit Wanamaker’s constant commissions as being the sole reason Frieseke was able to devote himself to painting.

FREDERICK FRIESEKE

"Bouquets de Fleurs" (1901) is a glowing Post-Impressionist still life. As the revolutionary wave of Impressionism receded from its apex, artists such as Henri Manguin, Henri Matisse, Kees van Dongen, Louis Valtat, and others emerged as part of the new avant-garde in Europe. These “Fauves,” or roughly translated “wild beasts,” would attack their canvases with a bold and vibrant new palette. This completely new way of painting was not initially celebrated by critics, or the artistic elite, but is today recognized among the most innovative and original artistic movements of the 20th Century.    
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<br>The present work, painted just before the revolution of Fauvism took hold, demonstrates a critical transitionary period in Modern Art. The subject is depicted with a masterful compositional sense and attention to spatial relationships. Manguin’s competency in composition would allow him to experiment freely with color during the first decade of the 20th Century. The slightly later but comparable Manguin still life “Flowers” (1915) is in the permanent collection of the Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia.

HENRI MANGUIN

"View of the Mountains from the Nihon Alps Salada Road" from 2007 is a stylized video work reminiscent of 19th-century Japanese woodblock prints.  Roadways, highways, and country roads have long been a favored subject for Opie; here, this interest is brought to life with a fresh and crisp 21st-century aesthetic. 
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<br>Opie is a master at setting up environments in his art; the idea of place and setting are crucial to his message. Opie discusses his work as an evolution, a circle of sorts. Each piece leaves an impact on all future works, even if it is in a small way. A 2020 solo exhibition of Opie's work at the Berardo Museum in Lisbon, Portugal, featured several video pieces comparable to the present work.

JULIAN OPIE

ROBERT NATKIN - Untitled - oil on canvas - 82 x 74 1/2 in.

ROBERT NATKIN

Elliot Hundley earned his MFA at the University of California, Los Angeles in 2005. His intricate collages are often meant to represent imaginary "operas" and invented narratives. Hundley will use his close friends and family as models; this makes the work more immediate for the artist. 
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<br>"Untitled" is a large-scale collage that invokes a sense of whimsical fantasy.  These collage works are not cluttered, but instead are filled with dense symbology and narrative that has deep personal meaning for the artist.  
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<br>Hundley is included in many museum collections worldwide including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Guggenheim Museum in New York, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in Los Angeles.

ELLIOTT HUNDLEY

RICHARD ANUSZKIEWICZ - Moonbow - acrylic on canvas - 48 x 48 in.

RICHARD ANUSZKIEWICZ

Harry Bertoia’s Willow sculpture resonates as an expression of grace and delicacy; qualities that bely the usual associations we have with the intrinsic properties of the alloy of which it is made. This suspended version – the rare version of Willow - seems to have a self-aware presence; one that delights in that contrast of properties. Yet it invites nothing more than existential pleasure in the viewing of it.  Think of Willow as a boldly articulated version of Calder if the latter master had a more organic or corporeal evocation in mind. Suspended, it commands its area yet respects its spatial relationship to its surround. Light, form, space – these are conceptual tools of the sculptor. But who else would think to use reflective material more readily associated with inflexibility and tensor strength to create a bouquet of cascading strands of stainless steel, suspended in space, flora-like and so gracefully beautiful?

HARRY BERTOIA

The Tang Dynasty (618-907 AD) was a prosperous cultural period that helped shape Chinese history's foundations for future centuries. This era was marked by notable technological and cultural advances, including gunpowder and printing. Among artistic advances during this period was the perfection of the sancai glaze technique, which was a prominent attribute of sculpture during this period. Sancai (tri-colored) glazing; the three glaze-colors used were ochre or brown, green and clear. Glazed wares where much more costly to produce than other terracotta wares, and were therefore only reserved for the wealthiest patrons.  
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<br>The Sancai- Glazed Earth Spirit offered here depicts a "Zhenmushou". Zhenmushou are mythical hybrid creatures, that have bodies which are a combination of dogs, lions, boars and other fierce animals. These fierce looking beasts, would be found in pairs guarding the entrance of Tang Dynasty tombs.  The function of these sculptures was to prevent the spirit of the tomb’s occupant from escaping, as well as to ward off evil spirits from entering.

CHINESE

ANDY WARHOL - Self-Portrait in Fright Wig - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

Dutch painter and sculptor Karel Appel was an influential founding member of the international avant-garde movement CoBrA active from 1948-1951. The collective, named for the initials of the members’ home cities Copenhagen, Brussels, and Amsterdam, rejected both traditional naturalism and abstraction devoid of expression. Drawing inspiration from the freedom of color, line, and form found in children’s art, Appel and his contemporaries sought to embrace spontaneity and experimentation. “Personage” from 1975 exemplifies the artist’s expressionist paint handling, thick impasto, and brilliant color.

KAREL APPEL

ALEX KATZ - Window 5 - oil on masonite - 24 x 24 in.

ALEX KATZ

ANDY WARHOL - Joseph Beuys - screenprint on laundry bag - 55 1/8 x 39 1/2 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Mao - screenprint in colors - 36 x 36 in.

ANDY WARHOL

Rodney McMillian is multidisciplinary artist working in sculpture, painting, performance, and video. Born in South Carolina, McMillian has lived in Southern California since 2000 where he is now Professor of Sculpture at the UCLA School of Arts and Architecture at the University of California, Los Angeles. "Lollipop" (2001-2002) represents one of the earliest works from the artist, who graduated with an MFA from CalArts in 2002.
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<br>McMillian shapes his work around the socio-political history of the United States even through abstraction. At first glance, "Lollipop" appears to be a continuation of Abstract Expressionism in its layered flow of paint. For these works, like abstract expressionists of yore, McMillian pours and drips paints. Nevertheless, on closer inspection, many of his works appear to suggest a map or landscape and thus, the history of struggle and power inherent to mapmaking and landscape painting. Who makes maps and for whom? Who owns the land and at what cost? What happens in that land? Furthermore, in using household paint and other industrial materials, McMillian mines issues of economy, accessibility, and even temporality as the materials are inherently unstable and non-archival.
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<br>McMillian's work is collected by the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Hammer Museum, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles among others, and his work was featured in the 2008 Whitney Biennial. In 2019, McMillian's work was exhibited at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art: “New York: Rodney McMillian”, Feb. 9-Jun. 9, 2019.

RODNEY MCMILLIAN

Richard Diebenkorn once explained, “All paintings start out of a mood, out of a relationship with things or people, out of a complete visual impression.” Known for his defining role in the Bay Area Figurative Art movement, a counter to the abstraction dominating post-war New York City, Diebenkorn often oscillated between figuration and abstraction. In 1952, he took a faculty position at the University of Illinois in Urbana for one academic year. There, he taught beginning drawing to architecture students and used one of the bedrooms in his house as a studio. This period from 1952-53, known as the Urbana series, was a productive and pivotal time in the development of Diebenkorn's style. His innovative exploration of figuration through abstraction began in these crucial early years and would come to full realization in his widely celebrated Ocean Park series of the late 1960s-80s.

RICHARD DIEBENKORN

THEODOROS STAMOS - Olympia Sun-Box - acrylic on canvas - 60 1/4 x 48 in.

THEODOROS STAMOS

North Wall was exhibited at the Getty Museum in the Pacific Standard Time exhibition tracing the history of art in L.A. from 1945 to 1980, which reignited interest in Light and Space and brought fresh eyes to the work of Norman Zammitt. For this piece, the artist measured the width of each band and created parabolic graphs to calculate the exacting color progression — not only for aesthetic precision, but also for emotional and spiritual effect. The colors seem to radiate as they shift from dark bands of black and blue to fiery yellows, oranges and reds. The hard edges of these bands bring to mind the school of L.A. artists who worked in geometric abstraction during the same period, predominantly the 1960s and ’70s, particularly Karl Benjamin's classic stripe paintings. But Zammitt’s ethereal pictures defy any such classification. His edges appear seamless — a moment in space frozen in time. The expanse evokes a sky in its full coastal California drama, although that was not necessarily the artist’s intention. Rather, he might have used these as an approach to the sublime — portal to a mystical realm. His late, longtime dealer, Joni Gordon of Newspace, suggested the exacting bands of brilliant color relate to Native Indian sand paintings.

NORMAN ZAMMITT

“One Up One Down Oblique” (1974) was created during a fruitful period for the artist.  In 1974, Rickey was elected to the National Institute of Arts and Letters (now the American Academy of Arts and Letters).  Rickey was exhibited widely in the 1970s, which led to extensive travel to cities including Rotterdam, Bellingham (WA), San Francisco, Albuquerque, Los Angeles, Mexico City, Amsterdam, London, and Glasgow. Many critics, scholars, dealers, and collectors have considered Rickey to be one of the most innovative sculptors of his time; his art was fresh and creative when many artists rejected classicism and tradition.  
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<br>A collector of “Constructivist” artwork himself, Rickey was continually drawn to the structure and balance of forms in space. In the present sculpture, one can see how even when working on a limited scale, the artist creates a sense of immense presence for his sculpture -- far more significant than its “tabletop” size.  
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<br>Rickey is included in countless museum collections worldwide, including the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, The Museum of Modern Art, The Snite Museum of Art, The Vero Beach Art Museum, the Tate Modern, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, among many others.

GEORGE RICKEY

ANDY WARHOL - Jean-Michel Basquiat Six Polaroids - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 1/2 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

RICO LEBRUN - Tip-toe Figure - bronze - 43 3/4 x 14 1/8 x 11 7/8 in.

RICO LEBRUN

The essential and dramatic declaration “Let there be light” of Genesis is not so far removed from Mary Corse’s recollection of the moment in 1968 when the late afternoon sun electrified the reflective road markings of Malibu as she drove east. In an instant, the glowing asphalt markings provided the oracle she needed to realize she could ‘put light in the painting and not just make a picture of light’.  Using the same glass microbeads utilized by road maintenance services, she layers and embeds the prismatic material in bands and geometric configurations creating nuanced glimmering abstract fields which shift as the viewer moves in relationship to the work. Move to one side and dimness brightens to light. Walk back and forth and you might feel a rippling effect from its shimmering, prismatic effects.
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<br>A photographic image of a Mary Corse microsphere painting is not only a dull representation, but it also misses the point – it is experience dependent art that requires participation to ‘be’.  Of course, “Untitled” (1975) defies that one-point static perspective and instead, depends upon a real time, interactive art experience which heightens awareness of the body in space as the viewer experiences shifts of retinal stimulation, sensation and feeling. It is a rare bird.  Unusually petite at two-foot square, its design, geometry and color belie her earlier revelation that led to a devotion to her usual reductive palette. Instead, it is a bold statement in sequined color, its center field bounded at the corners by a sparkling red stepped motif that separates it from its starry night sky corner spandrels. It may not include a star motif, but it has the glamour and presence that belongs along Hollywood’s Walk of Fame.

MARY CORSE

ANDY WARHOL - Self-Portrait - Polaroid - 4 1/4 x 4 1/2 in.

ANDY WARHOL

NORMAN ZAMMITT - East Wall - acrylic on canvas - 78 x 132 in.

NORMAN ZAMMITT

ANDY WARHOL - Self-Portrait - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Farrah Fawcett - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ARNE HIERSOUX - Mem Sahib - acrylic and paper on canvas - 70 1/2 x 120 1/2 in.

ARNE HIERSOUX

PETER SHELTON - onelongsleeve - metal - 29 1/2 x 47 3/4 x 10 1/2 in.

PETER SHELTON

Robert Natkin was a Chicago native that rose to prominence as a leading American painter in the 20th Century. Aklthough influenced by Abstract Expressionist artists such as Willem de Kooning, Natkin developed his own distinct style characterized by luscious color and texture. “Amethyst” (1960) is a strong representation of the artist’s work and was originally purchased directly from the artist’s studio in the 1960s.
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<br>Natkin's 1969 retrospective exhibition at the San Francisco Museum of Art was an early acknowledgment of the artist’s importance. He is represented in over 24 museum collections worldwide, including the Art Institute of Chicago and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

ROBERT NATKIN

"Bringing in the Ears" is a composition drawing for an advertisement for Niblets Corn, published in the August 10, 1942 edition of Life magazine. This drawing has been in the same family collection since 1970.
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<br>Among the most noteworthy illustrators this country has ever produced, Wyeth is also the patriarch of one of America’s most esteemed artistic dynasties. His son Andrew and grandson Jamie rank among the most respected artists of their generations, heavily influenced by other artists in the extended Wyeth family. N.C. Wyeth, in addition to illustrating more than 100 books, including adventure classics like Treasure Island, Kidnapped, Robinson Crusoe, and The Last of the Mohicans, was also a highly regarded muralist, receiving numerous commissions for prestigious corporate and government buildings throughout the United States.
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<br>Wyeth’s style, honed by early work at the Saturday Evening Post and Scribner’s, demonstrates his keen awareness of the revealing gesture, allowing readers to instantly grasp the essence of a scene. He possessed a rare ability to depict subjects and events from a child’s point of view, and is particularly known for dramatizing characters by the use of long shadow, a technique that is said to have influenced the epic moviemaking style of the 1940s. In addition to providing supplementary drama and excitement to the written word, Wyeth’s works have become classics in and of themselves.

N.C. WYETH

RON ARAD - Big Easy Volume 2 - stainless steel welded chair - 36 x 53 x 28 in.

RON ARAD

The Tang Dynasty (618-907 AD) was a prosperous cultural period that helped shape Chinese history's foundations for future centuries. This era was marked by notable technological and cultural advances, including gunpowder and printing. Among artistic advances during this period was the perfection of the sancai glaze technique, which was a prominent attribute of sculpture during this period. Sancai (tri-colored) glazing; the three glaze-colors used were ochre or brown, green and clear. Glazed wares where much more costly to produce than other terracotta wares, and were therefore only reserved for the wealthiest patrons.  
<br>
<br>The Sancai- Glazed Earth Spirit offered here depicts a "Zhenmushou". Zhenmushou are mythical hybrid creatures, that have bodies which are a combination of dogs, lions, boars and other fierce animals. These fierce looking beasts, would be found in pairs guarding the entrance of Tang Dynasty tombs.  The function of these sculptures was to prevent the spirit of the tomb’s occupant from escaping, as well as to ward off evil spirits from entering.

CHINESE

HENRY MOORE - Emperor's Heads - bronze with brown patina - 6 3/4 x 8 1/4 x 4 1/2 in.

HENRY MOORE

ANDY WARHOL - Self Portrait in Drag - unique Polacolor ER print - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Self-Portrait with Skull - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 1/2 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Self-Portrait with Camera (diptych) - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

PHILIP GUSTON - Untitled - ink on paper - 11 7/8 x 16 1/8 in.

PHILIP GUSTON

ANDY WARHOL - Self-Portrait - Polaroid, Polacolor II - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

MAURICE GOLUBOV - City Nocturne - oil on canvas - 32 x 42 in.

MAURICE GOLUBOV

ANDY WARHOL - Self-Portrait - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/2 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Self Portrait - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Self-Portrait in Drag - Polaroid - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

SEAN SCULLY - Mirror - watercolor and graphite on paper - 30 x 22 1/4 in.

SEAN SCULLY

ANDY WARHOL - Self Portrait at 'Flowers' Exhibition - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

FIONA RAE - Untitled (yellow, red + brown) - oil on canvas - 72 x 78 in.

FIONA RAE

ANDY WARHOL - Andy Warhol and Unidentified Man - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Self-Portrait - Polaroid, Polacolor SX-70 - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Lee Radziwill - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

FRANCESCO CLEMENTE - Untitled - pastel on paper - 26  x 18 3/4 in.

FRANCESCO CLEMENTE

WILLIAM TUCKER - Tuche, Greek Goddess of Fortune - bronze - 12 x 9 x 14 in.

WILLIAM TUCKER

ANDY WARHOL - Self-Portrait - Polaroid on board - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Warhol with Corn Flakes - Polaroid, Polacolor - 3 3/8 x 4 1/2 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Arnold Schwarzenegger - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Self-Portrait - Polaroid, Polacolor - 3 3/8 x 4 1/2 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Self Portrait with Mask - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Any Warhol Self-Portrait - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Andy Warhol - gelatin silver print - 10 x 8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Yves Saint Laurent - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Dennis Hopper - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Giorgio Armani - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Andy Painting - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 4 1/2 in.

ANDY WARHOL

CHRISTIAN ROSA - Untitled 2014 - oil on canvas - 82 1/2 x 70 3/4 in.

CHRISTIAN ROSA

ANDY WARHOL - Fiesta Pigs - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Shoes - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - David Hockney and Andy Warhol - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - John Denver - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Lisa Taylor - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Andy Warhol and Truman Capote - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Andy Self Portrait - silver gelatin print - 8 x 10 in.

ANDY WARHOL

HENRY MOORE - Sculpture Motives - ink, watercolor, and wax crayon on paper - 11 x 7 7/8 in.

HENRY MOORE

ANDY WARHOL - Candy Box - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Jean-Michel Basquiat in Soto Sculpture - silver gelatin print - 10 x 8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Maurice the Dog Two Polaroids - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/2 x 3 1/2 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Andy Warhol and Michael Jackson - silver gelatin print - 8 x 10 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Committee 2000 Champagne Glasses - Polaroid on board - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ENOC PEREZ - Don Q - oil on paper - 24 x 18 in.

ENOC PEREZ

ANDY WARHOL - Georgia O'Keeffe - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/2 x 3 1/2 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Willie Shoemaker - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

RICHARD ARTSCHWAGER - Chair - oak, cow hide, formica, steel - 39 x 40 x 52 in.

RICHARD ARTSCHWAGER

RICHARD ARTSCHWAGER - Chair - oak, cow hide, formica, steel - 39 x 40 x 52 in.

RICHARD ARTSCHWAGER

ANDY WARHOL - Julian Schnabel 4 Polaroids - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/2 x 3 1/2 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Donald Baechler - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

IRVING NORMAN - Women Welders, The Ship - graphite on paper - 14 1/4 x 28 3/8 in.

IRVING NORMAN

ANDY WARHOL - Bianca Jagger - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Andy Warhol - gelatin silver print - 10 x 8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Jane Fonda - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Jane Fonda - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Jane Fonda - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Man Ray - Polaroid Polacolor Type 108 print - 4 1/4 x 3 1/2 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Jean Paul Gaultier - Polaroid, Polacolor - 3 3/8 x 4 1/4 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Keith Haring - silver gelatin print - 10 x 8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Campbell's Soup Can (Wonton Soup) - Polaroid on board - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Pele - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Francesco Clemente 2 Polaroids - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/2 x 3 1/2 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - George - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Myths (Santa) - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Flowers - Polaroid on board - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Andy Warhol Abroad - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Henry Geldzahler - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/2 x 3 1/2 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - OJ Simpson - Polaroid, Polacolor - 3 3/8 x 4 1/4 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Jon Gould and Andy Warhol - silver gelatin print - 8 x 10 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Andy Warhol and Janice Dickenson - silver gelatin print - 10 x 8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Ryan O'Neal - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ARISTIDES DEMETRIOS - Bronze Bouquet - metal - 15 1/4 x 7 x 7 1/2 in.

ARISTIDES DEMETRIOS

ANDY WARHOL - Truman Capote - Polaroid - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Diane Von Furstenberg - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Mother Goose - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Gun - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Knives - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Perugina Candy Box - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Japanese Toy (Panda with Drum) - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Last Supper - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Aunt Jemima - unique Polacolor 2 print - 3 3/8 x 4 1/4 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Fancy Yarn - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Jean-Paul Gaultier - unique Polacolor ER Print - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Cookie Jar - unique Polacolor ER Print - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Andy and Barbi Benton - unique silver gelatin print - 8 x 10 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Carolina Herrera - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Crosses - Polaroid, Polacolor - 3 3/8 x 4 1/4 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Steve Rubell - silver gelatin print - 8 x 10 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Sao Schlumberger - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Farrah Fawcett Photo Shoot - silver gelatin print - 8 x 10 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Fred Hughes - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/2 x 3 1/2 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Cabbage Patch Doll - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - La Grande Passion - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Tatum O'Neal and John McEnroe - unique Polacolor ER Print - 3 3/8 x 4 1/4 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Leo Castelli - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/2 x 3 1/2 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Dog - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Roy Halston - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Donna Jordan - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Oscar de la Renta - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Alba Clemente - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/2 x 3 1/2 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Paola Dominguin - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Absolute Vodka - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Cheryl Tiegs - Polaroid - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Photograph of Steve Rubell for Interview Magazine, ie. - Polaroid - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Miguel Bose - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Bruno Acampora - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Japanese Toy - Polaroid, Polacolor - 3 3/8 x 4 1/4 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Howdy Doody - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Japanese Toy Parrot - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Union Square - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Model - Polaroid - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Candy Box - unique Polacolor Type 108 print - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Dental Molds - Polaroid, Polacolor - 3 3/8 x 4 1/4 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Robert Rauschenberg - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Jack Nicholson - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Ivan Karp - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Martha Graham - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Leonardo da Vinci - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Hadrian - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Diana Vreeland - Polaroid - 3 3/8 x 4 1/4 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Sonia Rykiel - Polaroid - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Bob Colacello - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. ea.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Grace Jones and Steve Rubell - silver gelatin print - 8 x 10 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Bill Wyman - Polaroid, Polacolor - 4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.

ANDY WARHOL

ANDY WARHOL - Shoe - Polaroid, Polacolor - 3 3/8 x 4 1/4 in.

ANDY WARHOL

JEFF KOONS - Cracked Egg - anodized aluminum - 4 3/4 x 3 1/4 x 3 1/4 in.

JEFF KOONS

NATHAN OLIVEIRA - Baboon (Black) - drypoint with aquatint - 44 1/4 x 39 in.

NATHAN OLIVEIRA

IRVING NORMAN - The Circus, Balancing Act 2 (a Study) - pencil on paper - 11 x 9 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - The Circus, The Balancing Act 2a (a Study) - pencil on paper - 11 x 9 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - From Work - lithograph on paper - 20 x 25 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Possible Study for "The Immortality of Beethoven's 9th Symphony") - pencil on paper - 14 x 11  in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Bodies in Crypt) - pencil on paper - 7 1/2 x 3 7/8 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (War Study) - graphite on paper - 6 x 3 1/2 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Bodies) - pencil on paper - 6 3/4 x 2 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Smoking Man) - pen on paper - 8 7/8 x 6 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Man with Fire Bird) - graphite and crayon on paper - 12 x 8 7/8 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Couple) - graphite on paper - 5 x 3 1/2 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Possible Study for "Celebration") - graphite on paper - 4 7/8 x 3 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Possible Study for "From Work") - pencil on paper - 11 x 14 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Head with Fire) - graphite and crayon on paper - 12 x 8 7/8 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Possible Study for "From Work") - pencil on paper - 11 x 14 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Abstract Heads) - pen on paper - 8 7/8 x 6 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Possible Study for "The Immortality of Beethoven's 9th Symphony" 2) - graphite on paper - 14 x 11 in.

IRVING NORMAN

IRVING NORMAN - Untitled (Four Heads) - graphite on paper - 5 x 3 1/2 in.

IRVING NORMAN