This artwork is no longer available.
Please contact the gallery for more information.
“Buying is more American than thinking, and I’m as American as they come.” Andy Warhol

History

Who else but Andy Warhol could almost literally print money? Perhaps one of the most famous artists, not just in America but globally, Warhol upended our understanding of what counted as art, the production of art, and the consumption of art. From his elevation of the humble Campbell soup can to the alluringly dark portrait of Marilyn Monroe, Warhol deciphered the values of American society filtered through a glamours lens. He captured our collective imagination while also infiltrating our visual landscape.

It was not just his subject matter that altered visual culture but his process to create art. Warhol began making silkscreen paintings in 1962 because of its assembly line process in which he could remove the hand of the artist as much as possible. To create these works, Warhol would select photographs from newspapers and magazines, send them to a printer to be enlarged on silk screens, and then direct assistants to lay the screens over canvases and apply his carefully chosen colors with a squeegee. In this way, Warhol could produce works quickly and mechanically, a strange twist of Minimalism’s obsession with mechanization and the reduction of the artist’s hand.

Warhol understood art as commerce and commerce as art. Never compromising on either side, he could present works that are shallow pandering and thoughtful comments on American society.

Although most associated with the Pop Art movement of mid-century America, Warhol reached the pinnacle of his career and perhaps his most distilled vision of the country during the 1980s. It was during this decade in which Warhol reached the epitome of his examinations and in which he painted Triple Dollar Sign. More than ever, Warhol turned his eye to the rich, famous, and infamous, shining a light on what it means to be American and what is American culture.

More
  • Warhol_History1
    Andy Warhol, “One-Dollar Bill”, 1962, pencil, crayon, and gouache on paper, 30 x 40 in. The Broad
  • Warhol_History2
    Andy Warhol, “Dollar Sign”, 1981, acrylic and silkscreen on canvas, The Andy Warhol Museum
  • Warhol_History3
    Andy Warhol, “Dollar Sign”, 1981, Acrylic and silkscreen on canvas, 109.5 x 70 in. Musée d’Art Moderne et d’Art Contemporain, Nice
  • Warhol_History4
    Andy Warhol, “Self-Portrait”, c. 1980, Polaroid, 4 ¼ x 3 3/8 in, available for sale
  • Warhol_History5
    Andy Warhol, “Self-Portrait”, 1986, Polaroid, 4 ¼ x 3 3/8 in., available for sale
“I like money on the wall. Say you were going to buy a painting: I think you should take that money, tie it up, and hang it on the wall. Then, when someone visited you, the first thing they would see is the money on the wall.” – Andy Warhol

MARKET INSIGHTS

  • Warhol_MarketInsightFINAL
  • The graph by Art Market Research shows that since 1976, works by Andy Warhol have increased at an 8.2% annual rate of return
  • The Warhol market is marked by major sales of iconic subjects, such as “Silver Car Crash (Double Disaster)” which sold for over $105 million USD in 2013.
  • 15 smaller-format Warhol works have sold for over $5 million at auction, with several 20 x 16-inch examples of iconic subjects like Jackie and Marilyn selling for $20-40 million USD. The Dollar Sign is a less iconic, but instantly recognizable Warhol subject.

Top Results at Auction

“Silver car crash (Double disaster)” (1963), silkscreen ink and spray paint on canvas, 105 x 164 1/8 in. Sold at Sotheby’s New York: 13 November 2013 for $105,445,000.
“Silver car crash (Double disaster)” (1963), silkscreen ink and spray paint on canvas, 105 x 164 1/8 in. Sold at Sotheby’s New York: 13 November 2013 for $105,445,000.
“Triple Elvis” (1963), silkscreen ink and silver paint on canvas, 82 x 69 in. Sold at Christie’s New York: 12 November 2014 for $81,925,000.
“Triple Elvis” (1963), silkscreen ink and silver paint on canvas, 82 x 69 in. Sold at Christie’s New York: 12 November 2014 for $81,925,000.
“Green Car Crash (Green Burning Car I)” (1963), synthetic polymer, silkscreen ink and acrylic on linen, 90 x 80 in.  Sold at Christie’s New York: 16 May 2007 for $71,720,000.
“Green Car Crash (Green Burning Car I)” (1963), synthetic polymer, silkscreen ink and acrylic on linen, 90 x 80 in. Sold at Christie’s New York: 16 May 2007 for $71,720,000.
“Four Marlons” (1966), silkscreen ink on unprimed linen, 81 x 65 in.  Sold at Christie’s New York: 12 November 2014 for $69,605,000.
“Four Marlons” (1966), silkscreen ink on unprimed linen, 81 x 65 in. Sold at Christie’s New York: 12 November 2014 for $69,605,000.

Comparable Paintings Sold at Auction

“Dollar Signs” (1981), acrylic and silkscreen ink on canvas, 90 x 70 in. Sold at Sotheby’s London: 01 July 2015 for $10,815,242 USD
“Dollar Signs” (1981), acrylic and silkscreen ink on canvas, 90 x 70 in. Sold at Sotheby’s London: 01 July 2015 for $10,815,242 USD
  • Same year and subject matter
  • Much larger scale
“Air Mail Stamps” (1962), acrylic on canvas, 16 x 20 in. Sold at Christie’s London: 14 October 2007 for $2,775,630
“Air Mail Stamps” (1962), acrylic on canvas, 16 x 20 in. Sold at Christie’s London: 14 October 2007 for $2,775,630
  • Comparable size and repeated imagery
  • Sold for over $2.7 million, indicating market demand for works of this scale
  • This sale occurred in 2007, and the Warhol market has increased since then
“Two Marilyns” (1962), acrylic and silkscreen ink on linen, laid on canvas 12 1/2 x 22 in. Sold at Phillips New York: 17 May 2018 for $3,615,000 USD
“Two Marilyns” (1962), acrylic and silkscreen ink on linen, laid on canvas 12 1/2 x 22 in. Sold at Phillips New York: 17 May 2018 for $3,615,000 USD
  • Another unique piece in a small-scale horizontal format
  • An iconic subject, though an early example with an atypical unfinished look
“Flowers (in 2 parts)” (1964), silkscreen ink on canvas laid on canvas 14 x 14 in. (each) Sold at Sotheby’s London: 01 July 2015 for $2,256,754 USD
“Flowers (in 2 parts)” (1964), silkscreen ink on canvas laid on canvas 14 x 14 in. (each) Sold at Sotheby’s London: 01 July 2015 for $2,256,754 USD
  • Example of another iconic Warhol subject in a smaller format achieving a significant result at auction
  • Triple Dollar Sign and Flowers are both unique works on canvas
  • Recognizable Warhol subjects often sell for exponentially higher prices than works of the same subject at more intimate scales

Paintings in Museum Collections

“Dollar Sign” (1981) acrylic paint and silkscreen on canvas, 90 x 70 in., The Tate, London.
“Dollar Sign” (1981) acrylic paint and silkscreen on canvas, 90 x 70 in., The Tate, London.
“Dollar Sign” (1981) acrylic paint and silkscreen on canvas, The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh
“Dollar Sign” (1981) acrylic paint and silkscreen on canvas, The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh
“Dollar Sign” (1981) acrylic and silkscreen on canvas, 109.5 x 70 in. Musée d’Art Moderne et d’Art Contemporain, Nice
“Dollar Sign” (1981) acrylic and silkscreen on canvas, 109.5 x 70 in. Musée d’Art Moderne et d’Art Contemporain, Nice
“A Coke is a Coke and no amount of money can get you a better Coke than the one the bum on the corner is drinking. All the Cokes are the same and all the Cokes are good. Liz Taylor knows it, the President knows it, the bum knows it, and you know it.” – Andy Warhol

Inquire

Inquire - Art Single

You May Also Like