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HENRY MOORE (1898-1986)

 
Among the most desirable subjects in Moore's oeuvre are his Family Groups.  The theme was first explored in a 1922 stone sculpture and evolved into a public commission from the British government prior to World War II. After the war, the subject was revisited as the message of rebuilding strong families was critical to the British people's recovery.
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<br>"Family Group" (1945) documents the optimisim and hope of Post-War Europe in sculptural form. The young family depicted shows the rebirth of the British people after one of the darkest eras in human history. Among the most desirable subjects in Moore's oeuvre are his Family Groups.  The theme was first explored in a 1922 stone sculpture and evolved into a public commission from the British government prior to World War II. After the war, the subject was revisited as the message of rebuilding strong families was critical to the British people's recovery.
<br>
<br>"Family Group" (1945) documents the optimisim and hope of Post-War Europe in sculptural form. The young family depicted shows the rebirth of the British people after one of the darkest eras in human history. Among the most desirable subjects in Moore's oeuvre are his Family Groups.  The theme was first explored in a 1922 stone sculpture and evolved into a public commission from the British government prior to World War II. After the war, the subject was revisited as the message of rebuilding strong families was critical to the British people's recovery.
<br>
<br>"Family Group" (1945) documents the optimisim and hope of Post-War Europe in sculptural form. The young family depicted shows the rebirth of the British people after one of the darkest eras in human history. Among the most desirable subjects in Moore's oeuvre are his Family Groups.  The theme was first explored in a 1922 stone sculpture and evolved into a public commission from the British government prior to World War II. After the war, the subject was revisited as the message of rebuilding strong families was critical to the British people's recovery.
<br>
<br>"Family Group" (1945) documents the optimisim and hope of Post-War Europe in sculptural form. The young family depicted shows the rebirth of the British people after one of the darkest eras in human history. Among the most desirable subjects in Moore's oeuvre are his Family Groups.  The theme was first explored in a 1922 stone sculpture and evolved into a public commission from the British government prior to World War II. After the war, the subject was revisited as the message of rebuilding strong families was critical to the British people's recovery.
<br>
<br>"Family Group" (1945) documents the optimisim and hope of Post-War Europe in sculptural form. The young family depicted shows the rebirth of the British people after one of the darkest eras in human history. Among the most desirable subjects in Moore's oeuvre are his Family Groups.  The theme was first explored in a 1922 stone sculpture and evolved into a public commission from the British government prior to World War II. After the war, the subject was revisited as the message of rebuilding strong families was critical to the British people's recovery.
<br>
<br>"Family Group" (1945) documents the optimisim and hope of Post-War Europe in sculptural form. The young family depicted shows the rebirth of the British people after one of the darkest eras in human history. Among the most desirable subjects in Moore's oeuvre are his Family Groups.  The theme was first explored in a 1922 stone sculpture and evolved into a public commission from the British government prior to World War II. After the war, the subject was revisited as the message of rebuilding strong families was critical to the British people's recovery.
<br>
<br>"Family Group" (1945) documents the optimisim and hope of Post-War Europe in sculptural form. The young family depicted shows the rebirth of the British people after one of the darkest eras in human history. Among the most desirable subjects in Moore's oeuvre are his Family Groups.  The theme was first explored in a 1922 stone sculpture and evolved into a public commission from the British government prior to World War II. After the war, the subject was revisited as the message of rebuilding strong families was critical to the British people's recovery.
<br>
<br>"Family Group" (1945) documents the optimisim and hope of Post-War Europe in sculptural form. The young family depicted shows the rebirth of the British people after one of the darkest eras in human history. Among the most desirable subjects in Moore's oeuvre are his Family Groups.  The theme was first explored in a 1922 stone sculpture and evolved into a public commission from the British government prior to World War II. After the war, the subject was revisited as the message of rebuilding strong families was critical to the British people's recovery.
<br>
<br>"Family Group" (1945) documents the optimisim and hope of Post-War Europe in sculptural form. The young family depicted shows the rebirth of the British people after one of the darkest eras in human history. Among the most desirable subjects in Moore's oeuvre are his Family Groups.  The theme was first explored in a 1922 stone sculpture and evolved into a public commission from the British government prior to World War II. After the war, the subject was revisited as the message of rebuilding strong families was critical to the British people's recovery.
<br>
<br>"Family Group" (1945) documents the optimisim and hope of Post-War Europe in sculptural form. The young family depicted shows the rebirth of the British people after one of the darkest eras in human history.
Family Group19457 x 4 x 2 1/4 in.(19.69 x 10.16 x 5.72 cm) bronze with patina
Provenance
Lord Kenneth Clark, Saltwood, acquired from the artist
The Honorable Colette Clark, Oxford, gift from the above
Fischer Fine Art, Ltd., London
Property from the Collection of Ryda and Robert H. Levi, acquired from the above, 23 May 1977
Sale, Christie's New York, Impressionist & Modern Art Evening Sale, 12 May 2016, sale 12069, lot 1 C
Private Collection, California
Literature
D. Sylvester, ed., Henry Moore: Complete Sculpture 1921-1948, London, 1957, vol. 1, p. 15, no. 238.
J. Hedgecoe and H. Moore, Henry Moore, New Yor
...More...k, 1968, p. 176, no. 4 (another cast illustrated; plaster version illustrated, pp. 163 and 269; dated 1944).
R. Melville, ed., Henry Moore: Sculpture and Drawings 1921-1969, London, 1970, no. 376 (another cast illustrated).
G. di San Lazzaro, "Homage to Henry Moore," Cahier's d'Art, 1972, p. 45 (terracotta version illustrated).
A. Bowness, ed., Henry Moore: Sculptures and Drawings 1964-73, London, 1977, vol. 4, p. 10 (terracotta version illustrated, pl. A).
B. von Erich Steingräber, "Henry Moore Maquetten" in Pantheon, 1978, p. 24 (terracotta version illustrated fig. 23).
D. Mitchinson, ed., Henry Moore Sculpture, London, 1981, p. 310, no. 174 (another cast illustrated in color, p. 94).
R. Berthoud, The Life of Henry Moore, London, 1987, fig. 88 (terracotta version illustrated).
J. Hedgecoe, Henry Moore: A Monumental Vision, Cologne, 2005, p. 210, no. 239 (another cast illustrated, p. 211).
...LESS...
Among the most desirable subjects in Moore's oeuvre are his Family Groups. The theme was first explored in a 1922 stone sculpture and evolved into a public commission from the British government prior to World War II. After the war, the subject was revisited as the message of rebuilding strong families was critical to the British people's recovery.

"Family Group" (1945) documents the optimisim and hope of Post-War Europe in sculptural form. The young family depicted shows the rebirth of the British people after one of the darkest eras in human history.
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“A sculptor is a person who is interested in the shape of things, a poet in words, a musician by sounds.” – Henry Moore

MARKET INSIGHTS

  • Moore AMR 1976
  • Henry Moore’s market for top sculptural works has seen significant activity since 2016 when Reclining Figure: Festival (1951) set the world record price for a work at auction, selling for $32,766,700.

  • Although Henry Moore was a prolific artist in a variety of media, his sculptures are the most desirable and will likely continue to see a rise in value as the supply of important bronzes continues to decrease. 

  • The graph by Art Market Research shows that since 1976, Henry Moore sculptures have increased at a 4.9% annual rate of return.

Top Moore Sculptures at Auction

"Reclining Figure: Festival" (1951), bronze with a brown patina, length 90 in. Sold at Christie’s London: 30 June 2016 for $32,766,700 USD
“Reclining Figure: Festival” (1951), bronze with a brown patina, length 90 in. Sold at Christie’s London: 30 June 2016 for $32,766,700 USD
"Reclining Figure: Festival" (1951), bronze with a brown patina, length 96 1/4 in. Sold at Christie’s London: 07 February 2012 for $30,316,600 USD
“Reclining Figure: Festival” (1951), bronze with a brown patina, length 96 1/4 in. Sold at Christie’s London: 07 February 2012 for $30,316,600 USD
"Reclining Figure" (1982), bronze with a dark brown patina, 97 x 47 in. Sold at Christie’s New York: 13 November 2017 for $11,000,000 USD
“Reclining Figure” (1982), bronze with a dark brown patina, 97 x 47 in. Sold at Christie’s New York: 13 November 2017 for $11,000,000 USD

Other Notable Auction Records

"Mother and Child with Apple" (1956), bronze with a brown and green patina, 28 ½ x 19 ¾ x 17 3/4 in. Sold at Christie’s London: 04 February 2014 for $8,168,500 USD
“Mother and Child with Apple” (1956), bronze with a brown and green patina, 28 ½ x 19 ¾ x 17 3/4 in. Sold at Christie’s London: 04 February 2014 for $8,168,500 USD
"Working Model for Three Piece No. 3: Vertebrae" (1968), bronze with a brown patina, length 92 ¾ in. Sold at Christie’s London: 07 February 2012 for $8,073,500 USD
“Working Model for Three Piece No. 3: Vertebrae” (1968), bronze with a brown patina, length 92 ¾ in. Sold at Christie’s London: 07 February 2012 for $8,073,500 USD
"Two Piece Reclining Figure: Points" (1969-1970), bronze with a dark brown patina, 92 x 144 x 72 in. Sold at Christie’s New York: 12 November 2015 for $7,669,000 USD
“Two Piece Reclining Figure: Points” (1969-1970), bronze with a dark brown patina, 92 x 144 x 72 in. Sold at Christie’s New York: 12 November 2015 for $7,669,000 USD
"Family Group" (1946), bronze with a green patina, height 17 ½ in. Sold at Christie’s London: 26 June 2017 for $4,915,000 USD
“Family Group” (1946), bronze with a green patina, height 17 ½ in. Sold at Christie’s London: 26 June 2017 for $4,915,000 USD

Sculptures in Museum Collections

"Reclining Figure: Circle" (1983), Bronze, cast number 1/9, 17 × 35 in. Los Angeles County Museum of Art
“Reclining Figure: Circle” (1983), Bronze, cast number 1/9, 17 × 35 in. Los Angeles County Museum of Art
"Girl Seated Against a Square Wall" (1957-1958), Bronze, 42 x 33-5/8 x 28-1/8 in. The Norton Simon Museum, Pasadena
“Girl Seated Against a Square Wall” (1957-1958), Bronze, 42 x 33-5/8 x 28-1/8 in. The Norton Simon Museum, Pasadena
"Family Group" (1944), Bronze, 5 7/8 × 5 × 2 3/4 in. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
“Family Group” (1944), Bronze, 5 7/8 × 5 × 2 3/4 in. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
"Family Group" (1945), bronze, 7 × 4 × 2 1/2 in. The Tate, London
“Family Group” (1945), bronze, 7 × 4 × 2 1/2 in. The Tate, London
“I have always paid great attention to natural forms, such as bones, shells, and pebbles… Pebbles show Nature’s way of working stone.” – Henry Moore

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