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JOHN PHILIP FALTER (1910-1982)

 
A significant figure in the illustration world during his time, John Philip Falter worked for McCall's, Life magazine, Look, Good Housekeeping and illustrated 129 covers for The Saturday Evening Post during his career. 
<br>
<br>"Spring Light" from 1969 exemplifies Falter's aim to visually preserve what he saw to be a diminishing facet of American life. He famously described his artwork and process: “It has been my hope to record what is probably the last of the great tradition of farming, of river life, of the domestic life so closely related to it, and of the small bits of peace and serenity that only exist close to nature. In treating what is, to me, a profoundly appealing subject, I have tried to be completely impersonal; it has been my wish to observe and record, to document and to commend the poetic way of life I have observed in many parts of America, from the Amish men of Pennsylvania to the cat fishermen of the Missouri River.” A significant figure in the illustration world during his time, John Philip Falter worked for McCall's, Life magazine, Look, Good Housekeeping and illustrated 129 covers for The Saturday Evening Post during his career. 
<br>
<br>"Spring Light" from 1969 exemplifies Falter's aim to visually preserve what he saw to be a diminishing facet of American life. He famously described his artwork and process: “It has been my hope to record what is probably the last of the great tradition of farming, of river life, of the domestic life so closely related to it, and of the small bits of peace and serenity that only exist close to nature. In treating what is, to me, a profoundly appealing subject, I have tried to be completely impersonal; it has been my wish to observe and record, to document and to commend the poetic way of life I have observed in many parts of America, from the Amish men of Pennsylvania to the cat fishermen of the Missouri River.” A significant figure in the illustration world during his time, John Philip Falter worked for McCall's, Life magazine, Look, Good Housekeeping and illustrated 129 covers for The Saturday Evening Post during his career. 
<br>
<br>"Spring Light" from 1969 exemplifies Falter's aim to visually preserve what he saw to be a diminishing facet of American life. He famously described his artwork and process: “It has been my hope to record what is probably the last of the great tradition of farming, of river life, of the domestic life so closely related to it, and of the small bits of peace and serenity that only exist close to nature. In treating what is, to me, a profoundly appealing subject, I have tried to be completely impersonal; it has been my wish to observe and record, to document and to commend the poetic way of life I have observed in many parts of America, from the Amish men of Pennsylvania to the cat fishermen of the Missouri River.” A significant figure in the illustration world during his time, John Philip Falter worked for McCall's, Life magazine, Look, Good Housekeeping and illustrated 129 covers for The Saturday Evening Post during his career. 
<br>
<br>"Spring Light" from 1969 exemplifies Falter's aim to visually preserve what he saw to be a diminishing facet of American life. He famously described his artwork and process: “It has been my hope to record what is probably the last of the great tradition of farming, of river life, of the domestic life so closely related to it, and of the small bits of peace and serenity that only exist close to nature. In treating what is, to me, a profoundly appealing subject, I have tried to be completely impersonal; it has been my wish to observe and record, to document and to commend the poetic way of life I have observed in many parts of America, from the Amish men of Pennsylvania to the cat fishermen of the Missouri River.” A significant figure in the illustration world during his time, John Philip Falter worked for McCall's, Life magazine, Look, Good Housekeeping and illustrated 129 covers for The Saturday Evening Post during his career. 
<br>
<br>"Spring Light" from 1969 exemplifies Falter's aim to visually preserve what he saw to be a diminishing facet of American life. He famously described his artwork and process: “It has been my hope to record what is probably the last of the great tradition of farming, of river life, of the domestic life so closely related to it, and of the small bits of peace and serenity that only exist close to nature. In treating what is, to me, a profoundly appealing subject, I have tried to be completely impersonal; it has been my wish to observe and record, to document and to commend the poetic way of life I have observed in many parts of America, from the Amish men of Pennsylvania to the cat fishermen of the Missouri River.” A significant figure in the illustration world during his time, John Philip Falter worked for McCall's, Life magazine, Look, Good Housekeeping and illustrated 129 covers for The Saturday Evening Post during his career. 
<br>
<br>"Spring Light" from 1969 exemplifies Falter's aim to visually preserve what he saw to be a diminishing facet of American life. He famously described his artwork and process: “It has been my hope to record what is probably the last of the great tradition of farming, of river life, of the domestic life so closely related to it, and of the small bits of peace and serenity that only exist close to nature. In treating what is, to me, a profoundly appealing subject, I have tried to be completely impersonal; it has been my wish to observe and record, to document and to commend the poetic way of life I have observed in many parts of America, from the Amish men of Pennsylvania to the cat fishermen of the Missouri River.” A significant figure in the illustration world during his time, John Philip Falter worked for McCall's, Life magazine, Look, Good Housekeeping and illustrated 129 covers for The Saturday Evening Post during his career. 
<br>
<br>"Spring Light" from 1969 exemplifies Falter's aim to visually preserve what he saw to be a diminishing facet of American life. He famously described his artwork and process: “It has been my hope to record what is probably the last of the great tradition of farming, of river life, of the domestic life so closely related to it, and of the small bits of peace and serenity that only exist close to nature. In treating what is, to me, a profoundly appealing subject, I have tried to be completely impersonal; it has been my wish to observe and record, to document and to commend the poetic way of life I have observed in many parts of America, from the Amish men of Pennsylvania to the cat fishermen of the Missouri River.” A significant figure in the illustration world during his time, John Philip Falter worked for McCall's, Life magazine, Look, Good Housekeeping and illustrated 129 covers for The Saturday Evening Post during his career. 
<br>
<br>"Spring Light" from 1969 exemplifies Falter's aim to visually preserve what he saw to be a diminishing facet of American life. He famously described his artwork and process: “It has been my hope to record what is probably the last of the great tradition of farming, of river life, of the domestic life so closely related to it, and of the small bits of peace and serenity that only exist close to nature. In treating what is, to me, a profoundly appealing subject, I have tried to be completely impersonal; it has been my wish to observe and record, to document and to commend the poetic way of life I have observed in many parts of America, from the Amish men of Pennsylvania to the cat fishermen of the Missouri River.” A significant figure in the illustration world during his time, John Philip Falter worked for McCall's, Life magazine, Look, Good Housekeeping and illustrated 129 covers for The Saturday Evening Post during his career. 
<br>
<br>"Spring Light" from 1969 exemplifies Falter's aim to visually preserve what he saw to be a diminishing facet of American life. He famously described his artwork and process: “It has been my hope to record what is probably the last of the great tradition of farming, of river life, of the domestic life so closely related to it, and of the small bits of peace and serenity that only exist close to nature. In treating what is, to me, a profoundly appealing subject, I have tried to be completely impersonal; it has been my wish to observe and record, to document and to commend the poetic way of life I have observed in many parts of America, from the Amish men of Pennsylvania to the cat fishermen of the Missouri River.” A significant figure in the illustration world during his time, John Philip Falter worked for McCall's, Life magazine, Look, Good Housekeeping and illustrated 129 covers for The Saturday Evening Post during his career. 
<br>
<br>"Spring Light" from 1969 exemplifies Falter's aim to visually preserve what he saw to be a diminishing facet of American life. He famously described his artwork and process: “It has been my hope to record what is probably the last of the great tradition of farming, of river life, of the domestic life so closely related to it, and of the small bits of peace and serenity that only exist close to nature. In treating what is, to me, a profoundly appealing subject, I have tried to be completely impersonal; it has been my wish to observe and record, to document and to commend the poetic way of life I have observed in many parts of America, from the Amish men of Pennsylvania to the cat fishermen of the Missouri River.”
Spring Light196922 x 40 in. tempera on board
Provenance
Lobster Pot Gallery, Nantucket, Massachusetts
Weschler's Auctions, Washington D.C.
 
Price250,000
A significant figure in the illustration world during his time, John Philip Falter worked for McCall's, Life magazine, Look, Good Housekeeping and illustrated 129 covers for The Saturday Evening Post during his career.

"Spring Light" from 1969 exemplifies Falter's aim to visually preserve what he saw to be a diminishing facet of American life. He famously described his artwork and process: “It has been my hope to record what is probably the last of the great tradition of farming, of river life, of the domestic life so closely related to it, and of the small bits of peace and serenity that only exist close to nature. In treating what is, to me, a profoundly appealing subject, I have tried to be completely impersonal; it has been my wish to observe and record, to document and to commend the poetic way of life I have observed in many parts of America, from the Amish men of Pennsylvania to the cat fishermen of the Missouri River.”
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