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JEFF KOONS (b. 1955)

 
JEFF KOONS - Girl with Lobster - color digital ditone print - 29 1/4 x 24 in. JEFF KOONS - Girl with Lobster - color digital ditone print - 29 1/4 x 24 in. JEFF KOONS - Girl with Lobster - color digital ditone print - 29 1/4 x 24 in. JEFF KOONS - Girl with Lobster - color digital ditone print - 29 1/4 x 24 in. JEFF KOONS - Girl with Lobster - color digital ditone print - 29 1/4 x 24 in. JEFF KOONS - Girl with Lobster - color digital ditone print - 29 1/4 x 24 in. JEFF KOONS - Girl with Lobster - color digital ditone print - 29 1/4 x 24 in. JEFF KOONS - Girl with Lobster - color digital ditone print - 29 1/4 x 24 in.
Girl with Lobster200929 1/4 x 24 in. color digital ditone print
Provenance
Private Collection, Colorado

22,000

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