Back

ROY LICHTENSTEIN (1923-1997)

 
Roy Lichtenstein’s style of Pop art was inspired by comic strips, in which he created images through a combination of mechanical reproduction and hand-drawing. He used iconic images and cultural influences to create striking action images, often with captions and onomatopoeic exclamations, much as one would find in comics. This screenprint is from a group of seven Reflections prints and in each, the image is obscured by color and patterns resembling the reflected light as if behind glass. Inspired by trying to photograph a work by Robert Rauschenberg behind glass, Lichtenstein appropriated images from his past and thus brings the appropriation of Pop art full circle. Roy Lichtenstein’s style of Pop art was inspired by comic strips, in which he created images through a combination of mechanical reproduction and hand-drawing. He used iconic images and cultural influences to create striking action images, often with captions and onomatopoeic exclamations, much as one would find in comics. This screenprint is from a group of seven Reflections prints and in each, the image is obscured by color and patterns resembling the reflected light as if behind glass. Inspired by trying to photograph a work by Robert Rauschenberg behind glass, Lichtenstein appropriated images from his past and thus brings the appropriation of Pop art full circle. Roy Lichtenstein’s style of Pop art was inspired by comic strips, in which he created images through a combination of mechanical reproduction and hand-drawing. He used iconic images and cultural influences to create striking action images, often with captions and onomatopoeic exclamations, much as one would find in comics. This screenprint is from a group of seven Reflections prints and in each, the image is obscured by color and patterns resembling the reflected light as if behind glass. Inspired by trying to photograph a work by Robert Rauschenberg behind glass, Lichtenstein appropriated images from his past and thus brings the appropriation of Pop art full circle. Roy Lichtenstein’s style of Pop art was inspired by comic strips, in which he created images through a combination of mechanical reproduction and hand-drawing. He used iconic images and cultural influences to create striking action images, often with captions and onomatopoeic exclamations, much as one would find in comics. This screenprint is from a group of seven Reflections prints and in each, the image is obscured by color and patterns resembling the reflected light as if behind glass. Inspired by trying to photograph a work by Robert Rauschenberg behind glass, Lichtenstein appropriated images from his past and thus brings the appropriation of Pop art full circle. Roy Lichtenstein’s style of Pop art was inspired by comic strips, in which he created images through a combination of mechanical reproduction and hand-drawing. He used iconic images and cultural influences to create striking action images, often with captions and onomatopoeic exclamations, much as one would find in comics. This screenprint is from a group of seven Reflections prints and in each, the image is obscured by color and patterns resembling the reflected light as if behind glass. Inspired by trying to photograph a work by Robert Rauschenberg behind glass, Lichtenstein appropriated images from his past and thus brings the appropriation of Pop art full circle. Roy Lichtenstein’s style of Pop art was inspired by comic strips, in which he created images through a combination of mechanical reproduction and hand-drawing. He used iconic images and cultural influences to create striking action images, often with captions and onomatopoeic exclamations, much as one would find in comics. This screenprint is from a group of seven Reflections prints and in each, the image is obscured by color and patterns resembling the reflected light as if behind glass. Inspired by trying to photograph a work by Robert Rauschenberg behind glass, Lichtenstein appropriated images from his past and thus brings the appropriation of Pop art full circle. Roy Lichtenstein’s style of Pop art was inspired by comic strips, in which he created images through a combination of mechanical reproduction and hand-drawing. He used iconic images and cultural influences to create striking action images, often with captions and onomatopoeic exclamations, much as one would find in comics. This screenprint is from a group of seven Reflections prints and in each, the image is obscured by color and patterns resembling the reflected light as if behind glass. Inspired by trying to photograph a work by Robert Rauschenberg behind glass, Lichtenstein appropriated images from his past and thus brings the appropriation of Pop art full circle. Roy Lichtenstein’s style of Pop art was inspired by comic strips, in which he created images through a combination of mechanical reproduction and hand-drawing. He used iconic images and cultural influences to create striking action images, often with captions and onomatopoeic exclamations, much as one would find in comics. This screenprint is from a group of seven Reflections prints and in each, the image is obscured by color and patterns resembling the reflected light as if behind glass. Inspired by trying to photograph a work by Robert Rauschenberg behind glass, Lichtenstein appropriated images from his past and thus brings the appropriation of Pop art full circle. Roy Lichtenstein’s style of Pop art was inspired by comic strips, in which he created images through a combination of mechanical reproduction and hand-drawing. He used iconic images and cultural influences to create striking action images, often with captions and onomatopoeic exclamations, much as one would find in comics. This screenprint is from a group of seven Reflections prints and in each, the image is obscured by color and patterns resembling the reflected light as if behind glass. Inspired by trying to photograph a work by Robert Rauschenberg behind glass, Lichtenstein appropriated images from his past and thus brings the appropriation of Pop art full circle. Roy Lichtenstein’s style of Pop art was inspired by comic strips, in which he created images through a combination of mechanical reproduction and hand-drawing. He used iconic images and cultural influences to create striking action images, often with captions and onomatopoeic exclamations, much as one would find in comics. This screenprint is from a group of seven Reflections prints and in each, the image is obscured by color and patterns resembling the reflected light as if behind glass. Inspired by trying to photograph a work by Robert Rauschenberg behind glass, Lichtenstein appropriated images from his past and thus brings the appropriation of Pop art full circle.
Reflections on Crash199059 1/8 x 75 in. lithograph, screenprint, relief, and metalized PVC collage
Provenance
Sotheby's London: Tuesday, April 1, 2008 [Lot 00454]
Melissa Morgan Fine Art, Palm Desert, California
Private Collection, California
Price250,000
Roy Lichtenstein’s style of Pop art was inspired by comic strips, in which he created images through a combination of mechanical reproduction and hand-drawing. He used iconic images and cultural influences to create striking action images, often with captions and onomatopoeic exclamations, much as one would find in comics. This screenprint is from a group of seven Reflections prints and in each, the image is obscured by color and patterns resembling the reflected light as if behind glass. Inspired by trying to photograph a work by Robert Rauschenberg behind glass, Lichtenstein appropriated images from his past and thus brings the appropriation of Pop art full circle.
Inquire

Similar Artworks

SAM FRANCIS - Coral Trails - acrylic on canvas - 78 x 108 in.

SAM FRANCIS

JULIAN SCHNABEL - Untitled - oil, resin, gesso, fabric and leather on seamed dropcloth - 96 x 120 in.

JULIAN SCHNABEL

SAM FRANCIS - Yellow, Blue & Orange - watercolor on paper - 22 1/8 x 30 1/8 in.

SAM FRANCIS

NORMAN ROCKWELL - Weighing In (The Jockey) - charcoal on collaged paper - 41 1/2 x 36 in.

NORMAN ROCKWELL

In the late 1970s, Richard Prince began taking photographs of photographs, appropriation art in line with the readymades of Marcel Duchamp. Untitled (Portrait)(Boy) was included in the sensational 2014 Gagosian exhibition, New Portraits. For this series, Prince himself commented on each of the Instagram images and appropriated them for this body of work, creating a precise snapshot of our time. This work challenges ideas of authorship, capturing a sense of immediacy within the apparatus of social media.

RICHARD PRINCE

RICHARD DIEBENKORN - Blue Surround - spit bite aquatint & drypoint aquatint on paper - paper: 35 x 26 1/4 in.

RICHARD DIEBENKORN

ED RUSCHA - The End - glass hologram set - 11 x 14

ED RUSCHA

TOM WESSELMANN - Study for Bedroom Painting #6 - pencil and thinned Liquitex on paper - 5 1/4 x 6 3/4 in.

TOM WESSELMANN

Donald Sultan’s Black and Blue from 2008 fits comfortably within both Pop art and Minimalism. The work is a sly reference to Warhol as if a polarized negative image of the Pop artist’s iconic Flower series. Working with unconventional use and application of paint, Sultan vacillates between abstraction and representational art, but always maintaining strong contrasts and powerful, simple statements. Sultan describes his work as "heavy structure, holding fragile meaning." Sultan’s work is represented in the permanent collections of many major museums in the United States and abroad, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Whitney Museum of American Art.

DONALD SULTAN

RICHARD DIEBENKORN - Untitled (Urbana Series) - ink on paper - 13 7/8 x 11

RICHARD DIEBENKORN

HASSEL SMITH - From A - B - acrylic on canvas - 68 x 68 in.

HASSEL SMITH

TOM WESSELMANN - Radio Edition - enamel on cut-out steel - 29 1/2 x 37 1/2 in.

TOM WESSELMANN

ROLAND PETERSEN - Luncheon - oil on canvas - 24 1/4 x 26 3/8 in.

ROLAND PETERSEN

JACK JEFFERSON - Mission #20 - oil on canvas - 77 x 50 in.

JACK JEFFERSON

ROBERT FRAME - Untitled - oil on canvas - 40 x 48 in.

ROBERT FRAME

LARRY BELL - Small Mirage Study #320 - vapor drawing on canvas - 30 x 30 in.

LARRY BELL

LAWRENCE SCHILLER - Robert Kennedy, San Diego - Vintage Silver Gelatin Photograph - 11 x 14 in.

LAWRENCE SCHILLER

ROBERT FRAME - Still Life on Green Table - oil on canvas - 30 x 40 in.

ROBERT FRAME

FRANK STELLA - Inaccessible Island Rail - offset lithograph and screenprint in colors - 34 x 46 in.

FRANK STELLA

ED RUSCHA - Black Ants - silkscreen printed in colors on wood-veneered paper - 20 1/4 x 27 1/4 in.

ED RUSCHA

RED GROOMS - Portrait of John Powers - watercolor on paper - 33 3/4 x 22 in.

RED GROOMS

ROBERT FRAME - River Bluff - oil on canvas - 20 x 24 in.

ROBERT FRAME

KENNETH NOLAND - Chevron - monotype on Japanese handmade paper mounted on board - 8 1/4 x 12 3/4 in.

KENNETH NOLAND

WILLIAM WEGMAN - On Mrs. Wegman's Couch - C-Print - 4 x 4 in.

WILLIAM WEGMAN

PROVENANCE:
<br>Acquired from artist California

ROBERT NATKIN

ELMER BISCHOFF - Untitled - ink wash collage with drawing on verso on paper - 21 7/8 x 18 7/8 in.

ELMER BISCHOFF

MASAKO TAKAHASHI - Untitled - oil on canvas - 32 x 26 in.

MASAKO TAKAHASHI

MASAKO TAKAHASHI - Untitled - oil on canvas - 33 3/4 x 26 in.

MASAKO TAKAHASHI

WILLIAM WEGMAN - Three Dolls - Silver gelatin print - 7 1/4 x 6 3/4 in.

WILLIAM WEGMAN

ELIOT PORTER - Coyote Gulch, Escalante River, Glen Canyon, Utah - dye-transfer print - 15 3/4 x 12 1/4 in.

ELIOT PORTER