N.C. WYETH (1882-1945)

ART INQUIRY

Inquire
 
N.C. Wyeth created this painting as an illustration for Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe (p. 270), part of the Scribner’s Classics series. The painting represents a pivotal scene in the novel in which Crusoe meets and rescues Friday, the indigenous man who becomes his companion. The scene here depicts Friday expressing his gratitude to Crusoe. Among the most noteworthy illustrators the United States has ever produced, Wyeth is also the patriarch of one of America’s most esteemed artistic dynasties. His son Andrew Wyeth produced some of the most celebrated realist works of 20th-century American art, admired for the emotional impact of their stories. N.C. Wyeth's mastery of visual narrative is on full display in this 1920 scene from classic literature.N.C. Wyeth created this painting as an illustration for Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe (p. 270), part of the Scribner’s Classics series. The painting represents a pivotal scene in the novel in which Crusoe meets and rescues Friday, the indigenous man who becomes his companion. The scene here depicts Friday expressing his gratitude to Crusoe. Among the most noteworthy illustrators the United States has ever produced, Wyeth is also the patriarch of one of America’s most esteemed artistic dynasties. His son Andrew Wyeth produced some of the most celebrated realist works of 20th-century American art, admired for the emotional impact of their stories. N.C. Wyeth's mastery of visual narrative is on full display in this 1920 scene from classic literature.N.C. Wyeth created this painting as an illustration for Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe (p. 270), part of the Scribner’s Classics series. The painting represents a pivotal scene in the novel in which Crusoe meets and rescues Friday, the indigenous man who becomes his companion. The scene here depicts Friday expressing his gratitude to Crusoe. Among the most noteworthy illustrators the United States has ever produced, Wyeth is also the patriarch of one of America’s most esteemed artistic dynasties. His son Andrew Wyeth produced some of the most celebrated realist works of 20th-century American art, admired for the emotional impact of their stories. N.C. Wyeth's mastery of visual narrative is on full display in this 1920 scene from classic literature.N.C. Wyeth created this painting as an illustration for Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe (p. 270), part of the Scribner’s Classics series. The painting represents a pivotal scene in the novel in which Crusoe meets and rescues Friday, the indigenous man who becomes his companion. The scene here depicts Friday expressing his gratitude to Crusoe. Among the most noteworthy illustrators the United States has ever produced, Wyeth is also the patriarch of one of America’s most esteemed artistic dynasties. His son Andrew Wyeth produced some of the most celebrated realist works of 20th-century American art, admired for the emotional impact of their stories. N.C. Wyeth's mastery of visual narrative is on full display in this 1920 scene from classic literature.N.C. Wyeth created this painting as an illustration for Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe (p. 270), part of the Scribner’s Classics series. The painting represents a pivotal scene in the novel in which Crusoe meets and rescues Friday, the indigenous man who becomes his companion. The scene here depicts Friday expressing his gratitude to Crusoe. Among the most noteworthy illustrators the United States has ever produced, Wyeth is also the patriarch of one of America’s most esteemed artistic dynasties. His son Andrew Wyeth produced some of the most celebrated realist works of 20th-century American art, admired for the emotional impact of their stories. N.C. Wyeth's mastery of visual narrative is on full display in this 1920 scene from classic literature.N.C. Wyeth created this painting as an illustration for Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe (p. 270), part of the Scribner’s Classics series. The painting represents a pivotal scene in the novel in which Crusoe meets and rescues Friday, the indigenous man who becomes his companion. The scene here depicts Friday expressing his gratitude to Crusoe. Among the most noteworthy illustrators the United States has ever produced, Wyeth is also the patriarch of one of America’s most esteemed artistic dynasties. His son Andrew Wyeth produced some of the most celebrated realist works of 20th-century American art, admired for the emotional impact of their stories. N.C. Wyeth's mastery of visual narrative is on full display in this 1920 scene from classic literature.N.C. Wyeth created this painting as an illustration for Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe (p. 270), part of the Scribner’s Classics series. The painting represents a pivotal scene in the novel in which Crusoe meets and rescues Friday, the indigenous man who becomes his companion. The scene here depicts Friday expressing his gratitude to Crusoe. Among the most noteworthy illustrators the United States has ever produced, Wyeth is also the patriarch of one of America’s most esteemed artistic dynasties. His son Andrew Wyeth produced some of the most celebrated realist works of 20th-century American art, admired for the emotional impact of their stories. N.C. Wyeth's mastery of visual narrative is on full display in this 1920 scene from classic literature.
"- and then he kneeled down again, kissed the ground, and taking me by the foot, set my foot upon hi192040 3/4 x 30 in. oil on canvas
Description
N.C. Wyeth created this painting as an illustration for Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe (p. 270), part of the Scribner’s Classics series. The painting represents a pivotal scene in the novel in which Crusoe meets and rescues Friday, the indigenous man who becomes his companion. The scene here depicts Friday expressing his gratitude to Crusoe. Among the most noteworthy illustrators the United States has ever produced, Wyeth is also the patriarch of one of America’s most esteemed artistic dynasties. His son Andrew Wyeth produced some of the most celebrated realist works of 20th-century American art, admired for the emotional impact of their stories. N.C. Wyeth's mastery of visual narrative is on full display in this 1920 scene from classic literature.