JULIAN SCHNABEL (b. 1951)

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Nicknames of Maitre D’s (1984) is a riot of oil and modeling paste on velvet, a favorite textile of Schnabel. The velvet absorbs light, making way for luminescent color, while also speaking to the era’s postmodern embrace of kitsch in its reference to velvet paintings. The painting recalls the artist’s experiences in nightclubs, including visual references to neon tubes, jukeboxes, dancing, and graffiti. Writ large in the painting are the European influences on Schnabel – Anselm Kiefer, Sigmar Polke, and Joseph Beuys – in his use of unconventional material and layered imagery.Nicknames of Maitre D’s (1984) is a riot of oil and modeling paste on velvet, a favorite textile of Schnabel. The velvet absorbs light, making way for luminescent color, while also speaking to the era’s postmodern embrace of kitsch in its reference to velvet paintings. The painting recalls the artist’s experiences in nightclubs, including visual references to neon tubes, jukeboxes, dancing, and graffiti. Writ large in the painting are the European influences on Schnabel – Anselm Kiefer, Sigmar Polke, and Joseph Beuys – in his use of unconventional material and layered imagery.Nicknames of Maitre D’s (1984) is a riot of oil and modeling paste on velvet, a favorite textile of Schnabel. The velvet absorbs light, making way for luminescent color, while also speaking to the era’s postmodern embrace of kitsch in its reference to velvet paintings. The painting recalls the artist’s experiences in nightclubs, including visual references to neon tubes, jukeboxes, dancing, and graffiti. Writ large in the painting are the European influences on Schnabel – Anselm Kiefer, Sigmar Polke, and Joseph Beuys – in his use of unconventional material and layered imagery.Nicknames of Maitre D’s (1984) is a riot of oil and modeling paste on velvet, a favorite textile of Schnabel. The velvet absorbs light, making way for luminescent color, while also speaking to the era’s postmodern embrace of kitsch in its reference to velvet paintings. The painting recalls the artist’s experiences in nightclubs, including visual references to neon tubes, jukeboxes, dancing, and graffiti. Writ large in the painting are the European influences on Schnabel – Anselm Kiefer, Sigmar Polke, and Joseph Beuys – in his use of unconventional material and layered imagery.Nicknames of Maitre D’s (1984) is a riot of oil and modeling paste on velvet, a favorite textile of Schnabel. The velvet absorbs light, making way for luminescent color, while also speaking to the era’s postmodern embrace of kitsch in its reference to velvet paintings. The painting recalls the artist’s experiences in nightclubs, including visual references to neon tubes, jukeboxes, dancing, and graffiti. Writ large in the painting are the European influences on Schnabel – Anselm Kiefer, Sigmar Polke, and Joseph Beuys – in his use of unconventional material and layered imagery.Nicknames of Maitre D’s (1984) is a riot of oil and modeling paste on velvet, a favorite textile of Schnabel. The velvet absorbs light, making way for luminescent color, while also speaking to the era’s postmodern embrace of kitsch in its reference to velvet paintings. The painting recalls the artist’s experiences in nightclubs, including visual references to neon tubes, jukeboxes, dancing, and graffiti. Writ large in the painting are the European influences on Schnabel – Anselm Kiefer, Sigmar Polke, and Joseph Beuys – in his use of unconventional material and layered imagery.Nicknames of Maitre D’s (1984) is a riot of oil and modeling paste on velvet, a favorite textile of Schnabel. The velvet absorbs light, making way for luminescent color, while also speaking to the era’s postmodern embrace of kitsch in its reference to velvet paintings. The painting recalls the artist’s experiences in nightclubs, including visual references to neon tubes, jukeboxes, dancing, and graffiti. Writ large in the painting are the European influences on Schnabel – Anselm Kiefer, Sigmar Polke, and Joseph Beuys – in his use of unconventional material and layered imagery.
Nicknames of Maitre D's1984108 x 252 in. oil and modeling paste on velvet, in 3 parts
Description
Nicknames of Maitre D’s (1984) is a riot of oil and modeling paste on velvet, a favorite textile of Schnabel. The velvet absorbs light, making way for luminescent color, while also speaking to the era’s postmodern embrace of kitsch in its reference to velvet paintings. The painting recalls the artist’s experiences in nightclubs, including visual references to neon tubes, jukeboxes, dancing, and graffiti. Writ large in the painting are the European influences on Schnabel – Anselm Kiefer, Sigmar Polke, and Joseph Beuys – in his use of unconventional material and layered imagery.