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JULIAN SCHNABEL (b. 1951)

 
Julian Schnabel is an American painter whose style is associated with the Neo-Expressionist movement of the 1980s. Pascin Pig Passin Time is part of Schnabel’s broken plate series of paintings, inspired by the trencadís, or broken tile mosaic, of architect Antoni Gaudí. With a humorous title and depicting his first wife, Jacqueline Beaurang, the broken ceramics give Schnabel an assertive and textural surface in which to create large-scale works that captured the brash and audacious period of the 1980s. Julian Schnabel is an American painter whose style is associated with the Neo-Expressionist movement of the 1980s. Pascin Pig Passin Time is part of Schnabel’s broken plate series of paintings, inspired by the trencadís, or broken tile mosaic, of architect Antoni Gaudí. With a humorous title and depicting his first wife, Jacqueline Beaurang, the broken ceramics give Schnabel an assertive and textural surface in which to create large-scale works that captured the brash and audacious period of the 1980s. Julian Schnabel is an American painter whose style is associated with the Neo-Expressionist movement of the 1980s. Pascin Pig Passin Time is part of Schnabel’s broken plate series of paintings, inspired by the trencadís, or broken tile mosaic, of architect Antoni Gaudí. With a humorous title and depicting his first wife, Jacqueline Beaurang, the broken ceramics give Schnabel an assertive and textural surface in which to create large-scale works that captured the brash and audacious period of the 1980s. Julian Schnabel is an American painter whose style is associated with the Neo-Expressionist movement of the 1980s. Pascin Pig Passin Time is part of Schnabel’s broken plate series of paintings, inspired by the trencadís, or broken tile mosaic, of architect Antoni Gaudí. With a humorous title and depicting his first wife, Jacqueline Beaurang, the broken ceramics give Schnabel an assertive and textural surface in which to create large-scale works that captured the brash and audacious period of the 1980s. Julian Schnabel is an American painter whose style is associated with the Neo-Expressionist movement of the 1980s. Pascin Pig Passin Time is part of Schnabel’s broken plate series of paintings, inspired by the trencadís, or broken tile mosaic, of architect Antoni Gaudí. With a humorous title and depicting his first wife, Jacqueline Beaurang, the broken ceramics give Schnabel an assertive and textural surface in which to create large-scale works that captured the brash and audacious period of the 1980s. Julian Schnabel is an American painter whose style is associated with the Neo-Expressionist movement of the 1980s. Pascin Pig Passin Time is part of Schnabel’s broken plate series of paintings, inspired by the trencadís, or broken tile mosaic, of architect Antoni Gaudí. With a humorous title and depicting his first wife, Jacqueline Beaurang, the broken ceramics give Schnabel an assertive and textural surface in which to create large-scale works that captured the brash and audacious period of the 1980s. Julian Schnabel is an American painter whose style is associated with the Neo-Expressionist movement of the 1980s. Pascin Pig Passin Time is part of Schnabel’s broken plate series of paintings, inspired by the trencadís, or broken tile mosaic, of architect Antoni Gaudí. With a humorous title and depicting his first wife, Jacqueline Beaurang, the broken ceramics give Schnabel an assertive and textural surface in which to create large-scale works that captured the brash and audacious period of the 1980s. Julian Schnabel is an American painter whose style is associated with the Neo-Expressionist movement of the 1980s. Pascin Pig Passin Time is part of Schnabel’s broken plate series of paintings, inspired by the trencadís, or broken tile mosaic, of architect Antoni Gaudí. With a humorous title and depicting his first wife, Jacqueline Beaurang, the broken ceramics give Schnabel an assertive and textural surface in which to create large-scale works that captured the brash and audacious period of the 1980s. Julian Schnabel is an American painter whose style is associated with the Neo-Expressionist movement of the 1980s. Pascin Pig Passin Time is part of Schnabel’s broken plate series of paintings, inspired by the trencadís, or broken tile mosaic, of architect Antoni Gaudí. With a humorous title and depicting his first wife, Jacqueline Beaurang, the broken ceramics give Schnabel an assertive and textural surface in which to create large-scale works that captured the brash and audacious period of the 1980s.
Pascin Pig Passin Time198348 x 40 x 6 in. oil, plates, and bondo on board
Provenance
Irena Hochman Fine Art, New York
Galerie Bischofberger, Zurich
Sotheby's London: Monday, October 15, 2007 [Lot 00269], Contemporary Art
Private Collection, Washington
Julian Schnabel is an American painter whose style is associated with the Neo-Expressionist movement of the 1980s. Pascin Pig Passin Time is part of Schnabel’s broken plate series of paintings, inspired by the trencadís, or broken tile mosaic, of architect Antoni Gaudí. With a humorous title and depicting his first wife, Jacqueline Beaurang, the broken ceramics give Schnabel an assertive and textural surface in which to create large-scale works that captured the brash and audacious period of the 1980s.
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