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MATT JOHNSON (b. 1978)

 
MATT JOHNSON - Pieta - cast bronze - 65 x 58 x 40 in. MATT JOHNSON - Pieta - cast bronze - 65 x 58 x 40 in. MATT JOHNSON - Pieta - cast bronze - 65 x 58 x 40 in. MATT JOHNSON - Pieta - cast bronze - 65 x 58 x 40 in. MATT JOHNSON - Pieta - cast bronze - 65 x 58 x 40 in. MATT JOHNSON - Pieta - cast bronze - 65 x 58 x 40 in. MATT JOHNSON - Pieta - cast bronze - 65 x 58 x 40 in. MATT JOHNSON - Pieta - cast bronze - 65 x 58 x 40 in. MATT JOHNSON - Pieta - cast bronze - 65 x 58 x 40 in. MATT JOHNSON - Pieta - cast bronze - 65 x 58 x 40 in.
Pieta200665 x 58 x 40 in. cast bronze
Provenance
Blum & Poe, Los Angeles
Private Collection, Idaho, 2006

230,000

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