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FRANZ KLINE (1910-1962)

 
Franz Kline was a central figure in American Art until his death in 1962. Close friends with Jackson Pollock and the “Cedar Tavern” group, Kline would help make New York City the epicenter of post-war avant-garde art in the 1940s and 1950s. Broad, gestural abstractions dominate the artist’s work. Those abstractions range from small, eloquent studies (such as the present work) and grow in scale to some of his monumentally scaled oil on canvas works, such as “Monitor” (1956) at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.  Kline tapped into the unconscious; his work portrays the free-flowing and impromptu moment. “Untitled” (1951) was in the artist’s collection until 1960, just two years before his death. Smaller-scale works of comparable quality can be found in museum collections worldwide. The Museum of Modern Art in New York has a similar drawing on newsprint: “Untitled” (1951). Franz Kline was a central figure in American Art until his death in 1962. Close friends with Jackson Pollock and the “Cedar Tavern” group, Kline would help make New York City the epicenter of post-war avant-garde art in the 1940s and 1950s. Broad, gestural abstractions dominate the artist’s work. Those abstractions range from small, eloquent studies (such as the present work) and grow in scale to some of his monumentally scaled oil on canvas works, such as “Monitor” (1956) at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.  Kline tapped into the unconscious; his work portrays the free-flowing and impromptu moment. “Untitled” (1951) was in the artist’s collection until 1960, just two years before his death. Smaller-scale works of comparable quality can be found in museum collections worldwide. The Museum of Modern Art in New York has a similar drawing on newsprint: “Untitled” (1951). Franz Kline was a central figure in American Art until his death in 1962. Close friends with Jackson Pollock and the “Cedar Tavern” group, Kline would help make New York City the epicenter of post-war avant-garde art in the 1940s and 1950s. Broad, gestural abstractions dominate the artist’s work. Those abstractions range from small, eloquent studies (such as the present work) and grow in scale to some of his monumentally scaled oil on canvas works, such as “Monitor” (1956) at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.  Kline tapped into the unconscious; his work portrays the free-flowing and impromptu moment. “Untitled” (1951) was in the artist’s collection until 1960, just two years before his death. Smaller-scale works of comparable quality can be found in museum collections worldwide. The Museum of Modern Art in New York has a similar drawing on newsprint: “Untitled” (1951). Franz Kline was a central figure in American Art until his death in 1962. Close friends with Jackson Pollock and the “Cedar Tavern” group, Kline would help make New York City the epicenter of post-war avant-garde art in the 1940s and 1950s. Broad, gestural abstractions dominate the artist’s work. Those abstractions range from small, eloquent studies (such as the present work) and grow in scale to some of his monumentally scaled oil on canvas works, such as “Monitor” (1956) at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.  Kline tapped into the unconscious; his work portrays the free-flowing and impromptu moment. “Untitled” (1951) was in the artist’s collection until 1960, just two years before his death. Smaller-scale works of comparable quality can be found in museum collections worldwide. The Museum of Modern Art in New York has a similar drawing on newsprint: “Untitled” (1951). Franz Kline was a central figure in American Art until his death in 1962. Close friends with Jackson Pollock and the “Cedar Tavern” group, Kline would help make New York City the epicenter of post-war avant-garde art in the 1940s and 1950s. Broad, gestural abstractions dominate the artist’s work. Those abstractions range from small, eloquent studies (such as the present work) and grow in scale to some of his monumentally scaled oil on canvas works, such as “Monitor” (1956) at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.  Kline tapped into the unconscious; his work portrays the free-flowing and impromptu moment. “Untitled” (1951) was in the artist’s collection until 1960, just two years before his death. Smaller-scale works of comparable quality can be found in museum collections worldwide. The Museum of Modern Art in New York has a similar drawing on newsprint: “Untitled” (1951). Franz Kline was a central figure in American Art until his death in 1962. Close friends with Jackson Pollock and the “Cedar Tavern” group, Kline would help make New York City the epicenter of post-war avant-garde art in the 1940s and 1950s. Broad, gestural abstractions dominate the artist’s work. Those abstractions range from small, eloquent studies (such as the present work) and grow in scale to some of his monumentally scaled oil on canvas works, such as “Monitor” (1956) at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.  Kline tapped into the unconscious; his work portrays the free-flowing and impromptu moment. “Untitled” (1951) was in the artist’s collection until 1960, just two years before his death. Smaller-scale works of comparable quality can be found in museum collections worldwide. The Museum of Modern Art in New York has a similar drawing on newsprint: “Untitled” (1951). Franz Kline was a central figure in American Art until his death in 1962. Close friends with Jackson Pollock and the “Cedar Tavern” group, Kline would help make New York City the epicenter of post-war avant-garde art in the 1940s and 1950s. Broad, gestural abstractions dominate the artist’s work. Those abstractions range from small, eloquent studies (such as the present work) and grow in scale to some of his monumentally scaled oil on canvas works, such as “Monitor” (1956) at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.  Kline tapped into the unconscious; his work portrays the free-flowing and impromptu moment. “Untitled” (1951) was in the artist’s collection until 1960, just two years before his death. Smaller-scale works of comparable quality can be found in museum collections worldwide. The Museum of Modern Art in New York has a similar drawing on newsprint: “Untitled” (1951). Franz Kline was a central figure in American Art until his death in 1962. Close friends with Jackson Pollock and the “Cedar Tavern” group, Kline would help make New York City the epicenter of post-war avant-garde art in the 1940s and 1950s. Broad, gestural abstractions dominate the artist’s work. Those abstractions range from small, eloquent studies (such as the present work) and grow in scale to some of his monumentally scaled oil on canvas works, such as “Monitor” (1956) at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.  Kline tapped into the unconscious; his work portrays the free-flowing and impromptu moment. “Untitled” (1951) was in the artist’s collection until 1960, just two years before his death. Smaller-scale works of comparable quality can be found in museum collections worldwide. The Museum of Modern Art in New York has a similar drawing on newsprint: “Untitled” (1951). Franz Kline was a central figure in American Art until his death in 1962. Close friends with Jackson Pollock and the “Cedar Tavern” group, Kline would help make New York City the epicenter of post-war avant-garde art in the 1940s and 1950s. Broad, gestural abstractions dominate the artist’s work. Those abstractions range from small, eloquent studies (such as the present work) and grow in scale to some of his monumentally scaled oil on canvas works, such as “Monitor” (1956) at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.  Kline tapped into the unconscious; his work portrays the free-flowing and impromptu moment. “Untitled” (1951) was in the artist’s collection until 1960, just two years before his death. Smaller-scale works of comparable quality can be found in museum collections worldwide. The Museum of Modern Art in New York has a similar drawing on newsprint: “Untitled” (1951). Franz Kline was a central figure in American Art until his death in 1962. Close friends with Jackson Pollock and the “Cedar Tavern” group, Kline would help make New York City the epicenter of post-war avant-garde art in the 1940s and 1950s. Broad, gestural abstractions dominate the artist’s work. Those abstractions range from small, eloquent studies (such as the present work) and grow in scale to some of his monumentally scaled oil on canvas works, such as “Monitor” (1956) at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.  Kline tapped into the unconscious; his work portrays the free-flowing and impromptu moment. “Untitled” (1951) was in the artist’s collection until 1960, just two years before his death. Smaller-scale works of comparable quality can be found in museum collections worldwide. The Museum of Modern Art in New York has a similar drawing on newsprint: “Untitled” (1951).
Untitled19519 5/8 x 6 3/4 in. brush and India Ink on paper
Provenance
Acquired from the artist, 1960
Helen Serger, Galerie La Boetie, Inc., New York
Z. Michael Legutko, Lipert Gallery, Brooklyn, New York
Private Collection, southern Germany
Ketterer Kunst GmbH & Co KG: Tuesday, December 5, 2006 [Lot 00304]. Part III - Post War
Hackett-Freedman Gallery, San Francisco
Private Collection, Florida

175,000

Franz Kline was a central figure in American Art until his death in 1962. Close friends with Jackson Pollock and the “Cedar Tavern” group, Kline would help make New York City the epicenter of post-war avant-garde art in the 1940s and 1950s. Broad, gestural abstractions dominate the artist’s work. Those abstractions range from small, eloquent studies (such as the present work) and grow in scale to some of his monumentally scaled oil on canvas works, such as “Monitor” (1956) at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Kline tapped into the unconscious; his work portrays the free-flowing and impromptu moment. “Untitled” (1951) was in the artist’s collection until 1960, just two years before his death. Smaller-scale works of comparable quality can be found in museum collections worldwide. The Museum of Modern Art in New York has a similar drawing on newsprint: “Untitled” (1951).
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