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JOAN MIRO (1893-1983)

 
"Tête de Femme" is based upon one of Miró’s most utilized themes. He characterized his sculptures as being from the ‘truly phantasmagoric world of living’ which is, undoubtedly, intended as a term of endearment. Yet "Tête de Femme" seems to evince something less monstrous or grotesque and instead presents in more sobering light as a free-standing, monolithic presence suggesting essential nature, if not a monumental one. Its attributions are fixed, intrinsic, and suggestive of its innateness; a strikingly austere design that adheres to Miró’s resistance to a classic bourgeois concept of ideal beauty. While it does not suggest a simple ‘female figure’ designation, there is plenty of referential material in the curves, domed protrusions, and a central depression suggesting a birthing matrix that in sum, evokes a celebration of fecundity and the creation of life. In any event, any tether to representational reality is a tenuous one, yet one that is calculated to stimulate the imagination and evoke unconscious primordial references and long-forgotten mythologies.
<br>
<br>Likely, Miro viewed this lustrous surface as fair compensation for its absence of color for which he is so well known. The impression is one that never suggests the sculptures of Miró are in any way derived from his painting, yet nor are they a complete deviation from that form of expression. Ultimately, it provides strong evidence that Miró was as engaged and involved in an intense dialogue with free-standing form as he ever was as a younger man working as a painter. "Tête de Femme" is cast in an edition of four, one of which was installed at the Yorkshire Sculpture Garden 2012 landmark exhibition "Miró: Sculptor." "Tête de Femme" is based upon one of Miró’s most utilized themes. He characterized his sculptures as being from the ‘truly phantasmagoric world of living’ which is, undoubtedly, intended as a term of endearment. Yet "Tête de Femme" seems to evince something less monstrous or grotesque and instead presents in more sobering light as a free-standing, monolithic presence suggesting essential nature, if not a monumental one. Its attributions are fixed, intrinsic, and suggestive of its innateness; a strikingly austere design that adheres to Miró’s resistance to a classic bourgeois concept of ideal beauty. While it does not suggest a simple ‘female figure’ designation, there is plenty of referential material in the curves, domed protrusions, and a central depression suggesting a birthing matrix that in sum, evokes a celebration of fecundity and the creation of life. In any event, any tether to representational reality is a tenuous one, yet one that is calculated to stimulate the imagination and evoke unconscious primordial references and long-forgotten mythologies.
<br>
<br>Likely, Miro viewed this lustrous surface as fair compensation for its absence of color for which he is so well known. The impression is one that never suggests the sculptures of Miró are in any way derived from his painting, yet nor are they a complete deviation from that form of expression. Ultimately, it provides strong evidence that Miró was as engaged and involved in an intense dialogue with free-standing form as he ever was as a younger man working as a painter. "Tête de Femme" is cast in an edition of four, one of which was installed at the Yorkshire Sculpture Garden 2012 landmark exhibition "Miró: Sculptor." "Tête de Femme" is based upon one of Miró’s most utilized themes. He characterized his sculptures as being from the ‘truly phantasmagoric world of living’ which is, undoubtedly, intended as a term of endearment. Yet "Tête de Femme" seems to evince something less monstrous or grotesque and instead presents in more sobering light as a free-standing, monolithic presence suggesting essential nature, if not a monumental one. Its attributions are fixed, intrinsic, and suggestive of its innateness; a strikingly austere design that adheres to Miró’s resistance to a classic bourgeois concept of ideal beauty. While it does not suggest a simple ‘female figure’ designation, there is plenty of referential material in the curves, domed protrusions, and a central depression suggesting a birthing matrix that in sum, evokes a celebration of fecundity and the creation of life. In any event, any tether to representational reality is a tenuous one, yet one that is calculated to stimulate the imagination and evoke unconscious primordial references and long-forgotten mythologies.
<br>
<br>Likely, Miro viewed this lustrous surface as fair compensation for its absence of color for which he is so well known. The impression is one that never suggests the sculptures of Miró are in any way derived from his painting, yet nor are they a complete deviation from that form of expression. Ultimately, it provides strong evidence that Miró was as engaged and involved in an intense dialogue with free-standing form as he ever was as a younger man working as a painter. "Tête de Femme" is cast in an edition of four, one of which was installed at the Yorkshire Sculpture Garden 2012 landmark exhibition "Miró: Sculptor." "Tête de Femme" is based upon one of Miró’s most utilized themes. He characterized his sculptures as being from the ‘truly phantasmagoric world of living’ which is, undoubtedly, intended as a term of endearment. Yet "Tête de Femme" seems to evince something less monstrous or grotesque and instead presents in more sobering light as a free-standing, monolithic presence suggesting essential nature, if not a monumental one. Its attributions are fixed, intrinsic, and suggestive of its innateness; a strikingly austere design that adheres to Miró’s resistance to a classic bourgeois concept of ideal beauty. While it does not suggest a simple ‘female figure’ designation, there is plenty of referential material in the curves, domed protrusions, and a central depression suggesting a birthing matrix that in sum, evokes a celebration of fecundity and the creation of life. In any event, any tether to representational reality is a tenuous one, yet one that is calculated to stimulate the imagination and evoke unconscious primordial references and long-forgotten mythologies.
<br>
<br>Likely, Miro viewed this lustrous surface as fair compensation for its absence of color for which he is so well known. The impression is one that never suggests the sculptures of Miró are in any way derived from his painting, yet nor are they a complete deviation from that form of expression. Ultimately, it provides strong evidence that Miró was as engaged and involved in an intense dialogue with free-standing form as he ever was as a younger man working as a painter. "Tête de Femme" is cast in an edition of four, one of which was installed at the Yorkshire Sculpture Garden 2012 landmark exhibition "Miró: Sculptor." "Tête de Femme" is based upon one of Miró’s most utilized themes. He characterized his sculptures as being from the ‘truly phantasmagoric world of living’ which is, undoubtedly, intended as a term of endearment. Yet "Tête de Femme" seems to evince something less monstrous or grotesque and instead presents in more sobering light as a free-standing, monolithic presence suggesting essential nature, if not a monumental one. Its attributions are fixed, intrinsic, and suggestive of its innateness; a strikingly austere design that adheres to Miró’s resistance to a classic bourgeois concept of ideal beauty. While it does not suggest a simple ‘female figure’ designation, there is plenty of referential material in the curves, domed protrusions, and a central depression suggesting a birthing matrix that in sum, evokes a celebration of fecundity and the creation of life. In any event, any tether to representational reality is a tenuous one, yet one that is calculated to stimulate the imagination and evoke unconscious primordial references and long-forgotten mythologies.
<br>
<br>Likely, Miro viewed this lustrous surface as fair compensation for its absence of color for which he is so well known. The impression is one that never suggests the sculptures of Miró are in any way derived from his painting, yet nor are they a complete deviation from that form of expression. Ultimately, it provides strong evidence that Miró was as engaged and involved in an intense dialogue with free-standing form as he ever was as a younger man working as a painter. "Tête de Femme" is cast in an edition of four, one of which was installed at the Yorkshire Sculpture Garden 2012 landmark exhibition "Miró: Sculptor." "Tête de Femme" is based upon one of Miró’s most utilized themes. He characterized his sculptures as being from the ‘truly phantasmagoric world of living’ which is, undoubtedly, intended as a term of endearment. Yet "Tête de Femme" seems to evince something less monstrous or grotesque and instead presents in more sobering light as a free-standing, monolithic presence suggesting essential nature, if not a monumental one. Its attributions are fixed, intrinsic, and suggestive of its innateness; a strikingly austere design that adheres to Miró’s resistance to a classic bourgeois concept of ideal beauty. While it does not suggest a simple ‘female figure’ designation, there is plenty of referential material in the curves, domed protrusions, and a central depression suggesting a birthing matrix that in sum, evokes a celebration of fecundity and the creation of life. In any event, any tether to representational reality is a tenuous one, yet one that is calculated to stimulate the imagination and evoke unconscious primordial references and long-forgotten mythologies.
<br>
<br>Likely, Miro viewed this lustrous surface as fair compensation for its absence of color for which he is so well known. The impression is one that never suggests the sculptures of Miró are in any way derived from his painting, yet nor are they a complete deviation from that form of expression. Ultimately, it provides strong evidence that Miró was as engaged and involved in an intense dialogue with free-standing form as he ever was as a younger man working as a painter. "Tête de Femme" is cast in an edition of four, one of which was installed at the Yorkshire Sculpture Garden 2012 landmark exhibition "Miró: Sculptor." "Tête de Femme" is based upon one of Miró’s most utilized themes. He characterized his sculptures as being from the ‘truly phantasmagoric world of living’ which is, undoubtedly, intended as a term of endearment. Yet "Tête de Femme" seems to evince something less monstrous or grotesque and instead presents in more sobering light as a free-standing, monolithic presence suggesting essential nature, if not a monumental one. Its attributions are fixed, intrinsic, and suggestive of its innateness; a strikingly austere design that adheres to Miró’s resistance to a classic bourgeois concept of ideal beauty. While it does not suggest a simple ‘female figure’ designation, there is plenty of referential material in the curves, domed protrusions, and a central depression suggesting a birthing matrix that in sum, evokes a celebration of fecundity and the creation of life. In any event, any tether to representational reality is a tenuous one, yet one that is calculated to stimulate the imagination and evoke unconscious primordial references and long-forgotten mythologies.
<br>
<br>Likely, Miro viewed this lustrous surface as fair compensation for its absence of color for which he is so well known. The impression is one that never suggests the sculptures of Miró are in any way derived from his painting, yet nor are they a complete deviation from that form of expression. Ultimately, it provides strong evidence that Miró was as engaged and involved in an intense dialogue with free-standing form as he ever was as a younger man working as a painter. "Tête de Femme" is cast in an edition of four, one of which was installed at the Yorkshire Sculpture Garden 2012 landmark exhibition "Miró: Sculptor." "Tête de Femme" is based upon one of Miró’s most utilized themes. He characterized his sculptures as being from the ‘truly phantasmagoric world of living’ which is, undoubtedly, intended as a term of endearment. Yet "Tête de Femme" seems to evince something less monstrous or grotesque and instead presents in more sobering light as a free-standing, monolithic presence suggesting essential nature, if not a monumental one. Its attributions are fixed, intrinsic, and suggestive of its innateness; a strikingly austere design that adheres to Miró’s resistance to a classic bourgeois concept of ideal beauty. While it does not suggest a simple ‘female figure’ designation, there is plenty of referential material in the curves, domed protrusions, and a central depression suggesting a birthing matrix that in sum, evokes a celebration of fecundity and the creation of life. In any event, any tether to representational reality is a tenuous one, yet one that is calculated to stimulate the imagination and evoke unconscious primordial references and long-forgotten mythologies.
<br>
<br>Likely, Miro viewed this lustrous surface as fair compensation for its absence of color for which he is so well known. The impression is one that never suggests the sculptures of Miró are in any way derived from his painting, yet nor are they a complete deviation from that form of expression. Ultimately, it provides strong evidence that Miró was as engaged and involved in an intense dialogue with free-standing form as he ever was as a younger man working as a painter. "Tête de Femme" is cast in an edition of four, one of which was installed at the Yorkshire Sculpture Garden 2012 landmark exhibition "Miró: Sculptor." "Tête de Femme" is based upon one of Miró’s most utilized themes. He characterized his sculptures as being from the ‘truly phantasmagoric world of living’ which is, undoubtedly, intended as a term of endearment. Yet "Tête de Femme" seems to evince something less monstrous or grotesque and instead presents in more sobering light as a free-standing, monolithic presence suggesting essential nature, if not a monumental one. Its attributions are fixed, intrinsic, and suggestive of its innateness; a strikingly austere design that adheres to Miró’s resistance to a classic bourgeois concept of ideal beauty. While it does not suggest a simple ‘female figure’ designation, there is plenty of referential material in the curves, domed protrusions, and a central depression suggesting a birthing matrix that in sum, evokes a celebration of fecundity and the creation of life. In any event, any tether to representational reality is a tenuous one, yet one that is calculated to stimulate the imagination and evoke unconscious primordial references and long-forgotten mythologies.
<br>
<br>Likely, Miro viewed this lustrous surface as fair compensation for its absence of color for which he is so well known. The impression is one that never suggests the sculptures of Miró are in any way derived from his painting, yet nor are they a complete deviation from that form of expression. Ultimately, it provides strong evidence that Miró was as engaged and involved in an intense dialogue with free-standing form as he ever was as a younger man working as a painter. "Tête de Femme" is cast in an edition of four, one of which was installed at the Yorkshire Sculpture Garden 2012 landmark exhibition "Miró: Sculptor." "Tête de Femme" is based upon one of Miró’s most utilized themes. He characterized his sculptures as being from the ‘truly phantasmagoric world of living’ which is, undoubtedly, intended as a term of endearment. Yet "Tête de Femme" seems to evince something less monstrous or grotesque and instead presents in more sobering light as a free-standing, monolithic presence suggesting essential nature, if not a monumental one. Its attributions are fixed, intrinsic, and suggestive of its innateness; a strikingly austere design that adheres to Miró’s resistance to a classic bourgeois concept of ideal beauty. While it does not suggest a simple ‘female figure’ designation, there is plenty of referential material in the curves, domed protrusions, and a central depression suggesting a birthing matrix that in sum, evokes a celebration of fecundity and the creation of life. In any event, any tether to representational reality is a tenuous one, yet one that is calculated to stimulate the imagination and evoke unconscious primordial references and long-forgotten mythologies.
<br>
<br>Likely, Miro viewed this lustrous surface as fair compensation for its absence of color for which he is so well known. The impression is one that never suggests the sculptures of Miró are in any way derived from his painting, yet nor are they a complete deviation from that form of expression. Ultimately, it provides strong evidence that Miró was as engaged and involved in an intense dialogue with free-standing form as he ever was as a younger man working as a painter. "Tête de Femme" is cast in an edition of four, one of which was installed at the Yorkshire Sculpture Garden 2012 landmark exhibition "Miró: Sculptor."
Tête de Femme (Déesse)1970 (cast 1988)66 x 36 1/2 x 30 in.(167.64 x 92.71 x 76.2 cm) bronze with black patina
Provenance
Galerie Maeght-Lelong, Paris
Pacific Art
Sale: Sotheby's, New York, May 10, 1989, lot 441
Private Collection
Literature
A. Jouffroy and J. Teixidor, Miró Sculptures, Paris, 1973, p. 202, no. 153 (plaster version illustrated, p. 153)
E.F. Miró and P.O. Chapel, Joan Miró: Sculptures, Catalogue Raisonne´, 1928-1982, Paris, 2006, p. 184, no. 182 (another cast illustrated)
"Tête de Femme" is based upon one of Miró’s most utilized themes. He characterized his sculptures as being from the ‘truly phantasmagoric world of living’ which is, undoubtedly, intended as a term of endearment. Yet "Tête de Femme" seems to evince something less monstrous or grotesque and instead presents in more sobering light as a free-standing, monolithic presence suggesting essential nature, if not a monumental one. Its attributions are fixed, intrinsic, and suggestive of its innateness; a strikingly austere design that adheres to Miró’s resistance to a classic bourgeois concept of ideal beauty. While it does not suggest a simple ‘female figure’ designation, there is plenty of referential material in the curves, domed protrusions, and a central depression suggesting a birthing matrix that in sum, evokes a celebration of fecundity and the creation of life. In any event, any tether to representational reality is a tenuous one, yet one that is calculated to stimulate the imagination and evoke unconscious primordial references and long-forgotten mythologies.

Likely, Miro viewed this lustrous surface as fair compensation for its absence of color for which he is so well known. The impression is one that never suggests the sculptures of Miró are in any way derived from his painting, yet nor are they a complete deviation from that form of expression. Ultimately, it provides strong evidence that Miró was as engaged and involved in an intense dialogue with free-standing form as he ever was as a younger man working as a painter. "Tête de Femme" is cast in an edition of four, one of which was installed at the Yorkshire Sculpture Garden 2012 landmark exhibition "Miró: Sculptor."
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