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LOUISE NEVELSON (1899-1988)

 
Best known for her monochromatic wood panel works, Louise Nevelson holds an important place in Modern Art history. A Russian native, Nevelson emigrated to the United States early in the 20th century to escape the worsening political situation across the Russian Empire. As a young child living in Rockland, Maine, her father, Isaac, supported the family as a woodcutter. Young Louise would have gotten her first exposure to this striking material's beauty and variance during these early years.  
<br>
<br>Nevelson gained attention and public praise when her art was exhibited at the 31st Venice Biennale. Her maze-like constructions were revolutionary in their presentation, not since the Dada and surrealist movements had an artist created such truly groundbreaking sculptural work. "Black Cryptic XVI," 1984 extolls the vigor and expression of Nevelson's most impactful and large scale works, but on a refined and restrained scale.
<br>
<br>Louise Nevelson is included in Museum collections worldwide, including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum of Modern Art, The Brooklyn Museum, The Tate, The Guggenheim, The Palm Springs Art Museum, The Art Institute of Chicago. Best known for her monochromatic wood panel works, Louise Nevelson holds an important place in Modern Art history. A Russian native, Nevelson emigrated to the United States early in the 20th century to escape the worsening political situation across the Russian Empire. As a young child living in Rockland, Maine, her father, Isaac, supported the family as a woodcutter. Young Louise would have gotten her first exposure to this striking material's beauty and variance during these early years.  
<br>
<br>Nevelson gained attention and public praise when her art was exhibited at the 31st Venice Biennale. Her maze-like constructions were revolutionary in their presentation, not since the Dada and surrealist movements had an artist created such truly groundbreaking sculptural work. "Black Cryptic XVI," 1984 extolls the vigor and expression of Nevelson's most impactful and large scale works, but on a refined and restrained scale.
<br>
<br>Louise Nevelson is included in Museum collections worldwide, including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum of Modern Art, The Brooklyn Museum, The Tate, The Guggenheim, The Palm Springs Art Museum, The Art Institute of Chicago. Best known for her monochromatic wood panel works, Louise Nevelson holds an important place in Modern Art history. A Russian native, Nevelson emigrated to the United States early in the 20th century to escape the worsening political situation across the Russian Empire. As a young child living in Rockland, Maine, her father, Isaac, supported the family as a woodcutter. Young Louise would have gotten her first exposure to this striking material's beauty and variance during these early years.  
<br>
<br>Nevelson gained attention and public praise when her art was exhibited at the 31st Venice Biennale. Her maze-like constructions were revolutionary in their presentation, not since the Dada and surrealist movements had an artist created such truly groundbreaking sculptural work. "Black Cryptic XVI," 1984 extolls the vigor and expression of Nevelson's most impactful and large scale works, but on a refined and restrained scale.
<br>
<br>Louise Nevelson is included in Museum collections worldwide, including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum of Modern Art, The Brooklyn Museum, The Tate, The Guggenheim, The Palm Springs Art Museum, The Art Institute of Chicago. Best known for her monochromatic wood panel works, Louise Nevelson holds an important place in Modern Art history. A Russian native, Nevelson emigrated to the United States early in the 20th century to escape the worsening political situation across the Russian Empire. As a young child living in Rockland, Maine, her father, Isaac, supported the family as a woodcutter. Young Louise would have gotten her first exposure to this striking material's beauty and variance during these early years.  
<br>
<br>Nevelson gained attention and public praise when her art was exhibited at the 31st Venice Biennale. Her maze-like constructions were revolutionary in their presentation, not since the Dada and surrealist movements had an artist created such truly groundbreaking sculptural work. "Black Cryptic XVI," 1984 extolls the vigor and expression of Nevelson's most impactful and large scale works, but on a refined and restrained scale.
<br>
<br>Louise Nevelson is included in Museum collections worldwide, including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum of Modern Art, The Brooklyn Museum, The Tate, The Guggenheim, The Palm Springs Art Museum, The Art Institute of Chicago. Best known for her monochromatic wood panel works, Louise Nevelson holds an important place in Modern Art history. A Russian native, Nevelson emigrated to the United States early in the 20th century to escape the worsening political situation across the Russian Empire. As a young child living in Rockland, Maine, her father, Isaac, supported the family as a woodcutter. Young Louise would have gotten her first exposure to this striking material's beauty and variance during these early years.  
<br>
<br>Nevelson gained attention and public praise when her art was exhibited at the 31st Venice Biennale. Her maze-like constructions were revolutionary in their presentation, not since the Dada and surrealist movements had an artist created such truly groundbreaking sculptural work. "Black Cryptic XVI," 1984 extolls the vigor and expression of Nevelson's most impactful and large scale works, but on a refined and restrained scale.
<br>
<br>Louise Nevelson is included in Museum collections worldwide, including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum of Modern Art, The Brooklyn Museum, The Tate, The Guggenheim, The Palm Springs Art Museum, The Art Institute of Chicago. Best known for her monochromatic wood panel works, Louise Nevelson holds an important place in Modern Art history. A Russian native, Nevelson emigrated to the United States early in the 20th century to escape the worsening political situation across the Russian Empire. As a young child living in Rockland, Maine, her father, Isaac, supported the family as a woodcutter. Young Louise would have gotten her first exposure to this striking material's beauty and variance during these early years.  
<br>
<br>Nevelson gained attention and public praise when her art was exhibited at the 31st Venice Biennale. Her maze-like constructions were revolutionary in their presentation, not since the Dada and surrealist movements had an artist created such truly groundbreaking sculptural work. "Black Cryptic XVI," 1984 extolls the vigor and expression of Nevelson's most impactful and large scale works, but on a refined and restrained scale.
<br>
<br>Louise Nevelson is included in Museum collections worldwide, including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum of Modern Art, The Brooklyn Museum, The Tate, The Guggenheim, The Palm Springs Art Museum, The Art Institute of Chicago. Best known for her monochromatic wood panel works, Louise Nevelson holds an important place in Modern Art history. A Russian native, Nevelson emigrated to the United States early in the 20th century to escape the worsening political situation across the Russian Empire. As a young child living in Rockland, Maine, her father, Isaac, supported the family as a woodcutter. Young Louise would have gotten her first exposure to this striking material's beauty and variance during these early years.  
<br>
<br>Nevelson gained attention and public praise when her art was exhibited at the 31st Venice Biennale. Her maze-like constructions were revolutionary in their presentation, not since the Dada and surrealist movements had an artist created such truly groundbreaking sculptural work. "Black Cryptic XVI," 1984 extolls the vigor and expression of Nevelson's most impactful and large scale works, but on a refined and restrained scale.
<br>
<br>Louise Nevelson is included in Museum collections worldwide, including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum of Modern Art, The Brooklyn Museum, The Tate, The Guggenheim, The Palm Springs Art Museum, The Art Institute of Chicago. Best known for her monochromatic wood panel works, Louise Nevelson holds an important place in Modern Art history. A Russian native, Nevelson emigrated to the United States early in the 20th century to escape the worsening political situation across the Russian Empire. As a young child living in Rockland, Maine, her father, Isaac, supported the family as a woodcutter. Young Louise would have gotten her first exposure to this striking material's beauty and variance during these early years.  
<br>
<br>Nevelson gained attention and public praise when her art was exhibited at the 31st Venice Biennale. Her maze-like constructions were revolutionary in their presentation, not since the Dada and surrealist movements had an artist created such truly groundbreaking sculptural work. "Black Cryptic XVI," 1984 extolls the vigor and expression of Nevelson's most impactful and large scale works, but on a refined and restrained scale.
<br>
<br>Louise Nevelson is included in Museum collections worldwide, including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum of Modern Art, The Brooklyn Museum, The Tate, The Guggenheim, The Palm Springs Art Museum, The Art Institute of Chicago. Best known for her monochromatic wood panel works, Louise Nevelson holds an important place in Modern Art history. A Russian native, Nevelson emigrated to the United States early in the 20th century to escape the worsening political situation across the Russian Empire. As a young child living in Rockland, Maine, her father, Isaac, supported the family as a woodcutter. Young Louise would have gotten her first exposure to this striking material's beauty and variance during these early years.  
<br>
<br>Nevelson gained attention and public praise when her art was exhibited at the 31st Venice Biennale. Her maze-like constructions were revolutionary in their presentation, not since the Dada and surrealist movements had an artist created such truly groundbreaking sculptural work. "Black Cryptic XVI," 1984 extolls the vigor and expression of Nevelson's most impactful and large scale works, but on a refined and restrained scale.
<br>
<br>Louise Nevelson is included in Museum collections worldwide, including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum of Modern Art, The Brooklyn Museum, The Tate, The Guggenheim, The Palm Springs Art Museum, The Art Institute of Chicago.
Black Cryptic XVI19845 x 4 3/4 x 2 in.(12.7 x 12.07 x 5.08 cm) painted wood and hardware
Provenance
Pace Gallery, New York
Anon. sale; Christie's East, New York, 14 November 1995, lot 228
Private Collection, California

40,000

Best known for her monochromatic wood panel works, Louise Nevelson holds an important place in Modern Art history. A Russian native, Nevelson emigrated to the United States early in the 20th century to escape the worsening political situation across the Russian Empire. As a young child living in Rockland, Maine, her father, Isaac, supported the family as a woodcutter. Young Louise would have gotten her first exposure to this striking material's beauty and variance during these early years.

Nevelson gained attention and public praise when her art was exhibited at the 31st Venice Biennale. Her maze-like constructions were revolutionary in their presentation, not since the Dada and surrealist movements had an artist created such truly groundbreaking sculptural work. "Black Cryptic XVI," 1984 extolls the vigor and expression of Nevelson's most impactful and large scale works, but on a refined and restrained scale.

Louise Nevelson is included in Museum collections worldwide, including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum of Modern Art, The Brooklyn Museum, The Tate, The Guggenheim, The Palm Springs Art Museum, The Art Institute of Chicago.
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