Back

ANSEL ADAMS (1902-1984)

 
Between 1978 and his passing in 1984, Ansel Adams meticulously curated a collection of photographic prints that he deemed emblematic works. Each photograph captures a moment of pristine beauty and serves as a reminder of the fragile balance between human development and the preservation of untouched wilderness. He aimed to make sets available to various institutions for public exhibition and educational purposes. They became known as the Ansel Adams Sets and are now in the collection of The National Gallery of Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, de Young Museum, and others. The set of twelve original gelatin-silver prints rarely come to the market. They are 11 x 14 and 16 x 20 inches, mounted on a 4-ply museum board, each signed by the artist in pencil. Between 1978 and his passing in 1984, Ansel Adams meticulously curated a collection of photographic prints that he deemed emblematic works. Each photograph captures a moment of pristine beauty and serves as a reminder of the fragile balance between human development and the preservation of untouched wilderness. He aimed to make sets available to various institutions for public exhibition and educational purposes. They became known as the Ansel Adams Sets and are now in the collection of The National Gallery of Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, de Young Museum, and others. The set of twelve original gelatin-silver prints rarely come to the market. They are 11 x 14 and 16 x 20 inches, mounted on a 4-ply museum board, each signed by the artist in pencil. Between 1978 and his passing in 1984, Ansel Adams meticulously curated a collection of photographic prints that he deemed emblematic works. Each photograph captures a moment of pristine beauty and serves as a reminder of the fragile balance between human development and the preservation of untouched wilderness. He aimed to make sets available to various institutions for public exhibition and educational purposes. They became known as the Ansel Adams Sets and are now in the collection of The National Gallery of Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, de Young Museum, and others. The set of twelve original gelatin-silver prints rarely come to the market. They are 11 x 14 and 16 x 20 inches, mounted on a 4-ply museum board, each signed by the artist in pencil. Between 1978 and his passing in 1984, Ansel Adams meticulously curated a collection of photographic prints that he deemed emblematic works. Each photograph captures a moment of pristine beauty and serves as a reminder of the fragile balance between human development and the preservation of untouched wilderness. He aimed to make sets available to various institutions for public exhibition and educational purposes. They became known as the Ansel Adams Sets and are now in the collection of The National Gallery of Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, de Young Museum, and others. The set of twelve original gelatin-silver prints rarely come to the market. They are 11 x 14 and 16 x 20 inches, mounted on a 4-ply museum board, each signed by the artist in pencil. Between 1978 and his passing in 1984, Ansel Adams meticulously curated a collection of photographic prints that he deemed emblematic works. Each photograph captures a moment of pristine beauty and serves as a reminder of the fragile balance between human development and the preservation of untouched wilderness. He aimed to make sets available to various institutions for public exhibition and educational purposes. They became known as the Ansel Adams Sets and are now in the collection of The National Gallery of Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, de Young Museum, and others. The set of twelve original gelatin-silver prints rarely come to the market. They are 11 x 14 and 16 x 20 inches, mounted on a 4-ply museum board, each signed by the artist in pencil. Between 1978 and his passing in 1984, Ansel Adams meticulously curated a collection of photographic prints that he deemed emblematic works. Each photograph captures a moment of pristine beauty and serves as a reminder of the fragile balance between human development and the preservation of untouched wilderness. He aimed to make sets available to various institutions for public exhibition and educational purposes. They became known as the Ansel Adams Sets and are now in the collection of The National Gallery of Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, de Young Museum, and others. The set of twelve original gelatin-silver prints rarely come to the market. They are 11 x 14 and 16 x 20 inches, mounted on a 4-ply museum board, each signed by the artist in pencil. Between 1978 and his passing in 1984, Ansel Adams meticulously curated a collection of photographic prints that he deemed emblematic works. Each photograph captures a moment of pristine beauty and serves as a reminder of the fragile balance between human development and the preservation of untouched wilderness. He aimed to make sets available to various institutions for public exhibition and educational purposes. They became known as the Ansel Adams Sets and are now in the collection of The National Gallery of Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, de Young Museum, and others. The set of twelve original gelatin-silver prints rarely come to the market. They are 11 x 14 and 16 x 20 inches, mounted on a 4-ply museum board, each signed by the artist in pencil. Between 1978 and his passing in 1984, Ansel Adams meticulously curated a collection of photographic prints that he deemed emblematic works. Each photograph captures a moment of pristine beauty and serves as a reminder of the fragile balance between human development and the preservation of untouched wilderness. He aimed to make sets available to various institutions for public exhibition and educational purposes. They became known as the Ansel Adams Sets and are now in the collection of The National Gallery of Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, de Young Museum, and others. The set of twelve original gelatin-silver prints rarely come to the market. They are 11 x 14 and 16 x 20 inches, mounted on a 4-ply museum board, each signed by the artist in pencil. Between 1978 and his passing in 1984, Ansel Adams meticulously curated a collection of photographic prints that he deemed emblematic works. Each photograph captures a moment of pristine beauty and serves as a reminder of the fragile balance between human development and the preservation of untouched wilderness. He aimed to make sets available to various institutions for public exhibition and educational purposes. They became known as the Ansel Adams Sets and are now in the collection of The National Gallery of Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, de Young Museum, and others. The set of twelve original gelatin-silver prints rarely come to the market. They are 11 x 14 and 16 x 20 inches, mounted on a 4-ply museum board, each signed by the artist in pencil. Between 1978 and his passing in 1984, Ansel Adams meticulously curated a collection of photographic prints that he deemed emblematic works. Each photograph captures a moment of pristine beauty and serves as a reminder of the fragile balance between human development and the preservation of untouched wilderness. He aimed to make sets available to various institutions for public exhibition and educational purposes. They became known as the Ansel Adams Sets and are now in the collection of The National Gallery of Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, de Young Museum, and others. The set of twelve original gelatin-silver prints rarely come to the market. They are 11 x 14 and 16 x 20 inches, mounted on a 4-ply museum board, each signed by the artist in pencil.
The Museum Set1927-196216 x 20 in. and 11 x 14 in.(40.64 x 50.8 cm) silver gelatin print
Provenance
Estate of Ansel Adams
Weston Gallery, Carmel, California
Private Collection, acquired from the above, 2001
Between 1978 and his passing in 1984, Ansel Adams meticulously curated a collection of photographic prints that he deemed emblematic works. Each photograph captures a moment of pristine beauty and serves as a reminder of the fragile balance between human development and the preservation of untouched wilderness. He aimed to make sets available to various institutions for public exhibition and educational purposes. They became known as the Ansel Adams Sets and are now in the collection of The National Gallery of Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, de Young Museum, and others. The set of twelve original gelatin-silver prints rarely come to the market. They are 11 x 14 and 16 x 20 inches, mounted on a 4-ply museum board, each signed by the artist in pencil.
Inquire