MAX PELLEGRINI (b. 1945)

ART INQUIRY

Inquire
 
In an abstracted image of St. Peter’s basilica in Rome, Pellegrini returns to religious narratives to express his “anti-ideological and anti-pauperist” impression of the church and its relationship with faith (Antonio Monda, “Interview with Max Pellegrini). In the lower half of the painting, the birth of Jesus is the central focus, while the life of the church is highlighted in the upper half. According to Pellegrini, he depicted the birth of Jesus in the style of a baroque 18th century Neapolitan nativity scene that can be interpreted “as a feast for the birth of faith.” This faith is conceived of as “the material support for the Popes’ power and of the Church’s glory,” represented in this painting by the Pope clutching the moon in his hand. 
<br> 
<br>
<br>- Partial text adapted from Max Pellegrini, July 2015, in conversation with Curator Chip TomIn an abstracted image of St. Peter’s basilica in Rome, Pellegrini returns to religious narratives to express his “anti-ideological and anti-pauperist” impression of the church and its relationship with faith (Antonio Monda, “Interview with Max Pellegrini). In the lower half of the painting, the birth of Jesus is the central focus, while the life of the church is highlighted in the upper half. According to Pellegrini, he depicted the birth of Jesus in the style of a baroque 18th century Neapolitan nativity scene that can be interpreted “as a feast for the birth of faith.” This faith is conceived of as “the material support for the Popes’ power and of the Church’s glory,” represented in this painting by the Pope clutching the moon in his hand. 
<br> 
<br>
<br>- Partial text adapted from Max Pellegrini, July 2015, in conversation with Curator Chip TomIn an abstracted image of St. Peter’s basilica in Rome, Pellegrini returns to religious narratives to express his “anti-ideological and anti-pauperist” impression of the church and its relationship with faith (Antonio Monda, “Interview with Max Pellegrini). In the lower half of the painting, the birth of Jesus is the central focus, while the life of the church is highlighted in the upper half. According to Pellegrini, he depicted the birth of Jesus in the style of a baroque 18th century Neapolitan nativity scene that can be interpreted “as a feast for the birth of faith.” This faith is conceived of as “the material support for the Popes’ power and of the Church’s glory,” represented in this painting by the Pope clutching the moon in his hand. 
<br> 
<br>
<br>- Partial text adapted from Max Pellegrini, July 2015, in conversation with Curator Chip TomIn an abstracted image of St. Peter’s basilica in Rome, Pellegrini returns to religious narratives to express his “anti-ideological and anti-pauperist” impression of the church and its relationship with faith (Antonio Monda, “Interview with Max Pellegrini). In the lower half of the painting, the birth of Jesus is the central focus, while the life of the church is highlighted in the upper half. According to Pellegrini, he depicted the birth of Jesus in the style of a baroque 18th century Neapolitan nativity scene that can be interpreted “as a feast for the birth of faith.” This faith is conceived of as “the material support for the Popes’ power and of the Church’s glory,” represented in this painting by the Pope clutching the moon in his hand. 
<br> 
<br>
<br>- Partial text adapted from Max Pellegrini, July 2015, in conversation with Curator Chip TomIn an abstracted image of St. Peter’s basilica in Rome, Pellegrini returns to religious narratives to express his “anti-ideological and anti-pauperist” impression of the church and its relationship with faith (Antonio Monda, “Interview with Max Pellegrini). In the lower half of the painting, the birth of Jesus is the central focus, while the life of the church is highlighted in the upper half. According to Pellegrini, he depicted the birth of Jesus in the style of a baroque 18th century Neapolitan nativity scene that can be interpreted “as a feast for the birth of faith.” This faith is conceived of as “the material support for the Popes’ power and of the Church’s glory,” represented in this painting by the Pope clutching the moon in his hand. 
<br> 
<br>
<br>- Partial text adapted from Max Pellegrini, July 2015, in conversation with Curator Chip TomIn an abstracted image of St. Peter’s basilica in Rome, Pellegrini returns to religious narratives to express his “anti-ideological and anti-pauperist” impression of the church and its relationship with faith (Antonio Monda, “Interview with Max Pellegrini). In the lower half of the painting, the birth of Jesus is the central focus, while the life of the church is highlighted in the upper half. According to Pellegrini, he depicted the birth of Jesus in the style of a baroque 18th century Neapolitan nativity scene that can be interpreted “as a feast for the birth of faith.” This faith is conceived of as “the material support for the Popes’ power and of the Church’s glory,” represented in this painting by the Pope clutching the moon in his hand. 
<br> 
<br>
<br>- Partial text adapted from Max Pellegrini, July 2015, in conversation with Curator Chip TomIn an abstracted image of St. Peter’s basilica in Rome, Pellegrini returns to religious narratives to express his “anti-ideological and anti-pauperist” impression of the church and its relationship with faith (Antonio Monda, “Interview with Max Pellegrini). In the lower half of the painting, the birth of Jesus is the central focus, while the life of the church is highlighted in the upper half. According to Pellegrini, he depicted the birth of Jesus in the style of a baroque 18th century Neapolitan nativity scene that can be interpreted “as a feast for the birth of faith.” This faith is conceived of as “the material support for the Popes’ power and of the Church’s glory,” represented in this painting by the Pope clutching the moon in his hand. 
<br> 
<br>
<br>- Partial text adapted from Max Pellegrini, July 2015, in conversation with Curator Chip Tom
Presepio2010-201159 1/4 x 59 1/4 x 1 in. oil on canvas
Description
In an abstracted image of St. Peter’s basilica in Rome, Pellegrini returns to religious narratives to express his “anti-ideological and anti-pauperist” impression of the church and its relationship with faith (Antonio Monda, “Interview with Max Pellegrini). In the lower half of the painting, the birth of Jesus is the central focus, while the life of the church is highlighted in the upper half. According to Pellegrini, he depicted the birth of Jesus in the style of a baroque 18th century Neapolitan nativity scene that can be interpreted “as a feast for the birth of faith.” This faith is conceived of as “the material support for the Popes’ power and of the Church’s glory,” represented in this painting by the Pope clutching the moon in his hand.


- Partial text adapted from Max Pellegrini, July 2015, in conversation with Curator Chip Tom

57,000