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PAT STEIR (b. 1940)

 
Pat Steir is a celebrated American painter and printmaker, best known for her Waterfall paintings of dripped, splashed, and poured paint. This large work on paper completed in 1985 is characterized by her usual sense of spontaneity and unpredictability, embracing nature as an active force in art. Recalling the explosive power of waves, the work on paper references the art historical tradition of 19th century artists Ando Hiroshige and Gustave Courbet, re-imagining their previous depictions of the irrepressible sea. This drawing was featured in the Museum of Modern Art’s 1985 exhibition, New Works on Paper 3. Steir’s large wave drawings comprise a distinct body of work from the mid 1980s, after which she began to experiment with the poured canvases that became waterfall paintings. Pat Steir is a celebrated American painter and printmaker, best known for her Waterfall paintings of dripped, splashed, and poured paint. This large work on paper completed in 1985 is characterized by her usual sense of spontaneity and unpredictability, embracing nature as an active force in art. Recalling the explosive power of waves, the work on paper references the art historical tradition of 19th century artists Ando Hiroshige and Gustave Courbet, re-imagining their previous depictions of the irrepressible sea. This drawing was featured in the Museum of Modern Art’s 1985 exhibition, New Works on Paper 3. Steir’s large wave drawings comprise a distinct body of work from the mid 1980s, after which she began to experiment with the poured canvases that became waterfall paintings. Pat Steir is a celebrated American painter and printmaker, best known for her Waterfall paintings of dripped, splashed, and poured paint. This large work on paper completed in 1985 is characterized by her usual sense of spontaneity and unpredictability, embracing nature as an active force in art. Recalling the explosive power of waves, the work on paper references the art historical tradition of 19th century artists Ando Hiroshige and Gustave Courbet, re-imagining their previous depictions of the irrepressible sea. This drawing was featured in the Museum of Modern Art’s 1985 exhibition, New Works on Paper 3. Steir’s large wave drawings comprise a distinct body of work from the mid 1980s, after which she began to experiment with the poured canvases that became waterfall paintings. Pat Steir is a celebrated American painter and printmaker, best known for her Waterfall paintings of dripped, splashed, and poured paint. This large work on paper completed in 1985 is characterized by her usual sense of spontaneity and unpredictability, embracing nature as an active force in art. Recalling the explosive power of waves, the work on paper references the art historical tradition of 19th century artists Ando Hiroshige and Gustave Courbet, re-imagining their previous depictions of the irrepressible sea. This drawing was featured in the Museum of Modern Art’s 1985 exhibition, New Works on Paper 3. Steir’s large wave drawings comprise a distinct body of work from the mid 1980s, after which she began to experiment with the poured canvases that became waterfall paintings. Pat Steir is a celebrated American painter and printmaker, best known for her Waterfall paintings of dripped, splashed, and poured paint. This large work on paper completed in 1985 is characterized by her usual sense of spontaneity and unpredictability, embracing nature as an active force in art. Recalling the explosive power of waves, the work on paper references the art historical tradition of 19th century artists Ando Hiroshige and Gustave Courbet, re-imagining their previous depictions of the irrepressible sea. This drawing was featured in the Museum of Modern Art’s 1985 exhibition, New Works on Paper 3. Steir’s large wave drawings comprise a distinct body of work from the mid 1980s, after which she began to experiment with the poured canvases that became waterfall paintings. Pat Steir is a celebrated American painter and printmaker, best known for her Waterfall paintings of dripped, splashed, and poured paint. This large work on paper completed in 1985 is characterized by her usual sense of spontaneity and unpredictability, embracing nature as an active force in art. Recalling the explosive power of waves, the work on paper references the art historical tradition of 19th century artists Ando Hiroshige and Gustave Courbet, re-imagining their previous depictions of the irrepressible sea. This drawing was featured in the Museum of Modern Art’s 1985 exhibition, New Works on Paper 3. Steir’s large wave drawings comprise a distinct body of work from the mid 1980s, after which she began to experiment with the poured canvases that became waterfall paintings. Pat Steir is a celebrated American painter and printmaker, best known for her Waterfall paintings of dripped, splashed, and poured paint. This large work on paper completed in 1985 is characterized by her usual sense of spontaneity and unpredictability, embracing nature as an active force in art. Recalling the explosive power of waves, the work on paper references the art historical tradition of 19th century artists Ando Hiroshige and Gustave Courbet, re-imagining their previous depictions of the irrepressible sea. This drawing was featured in the Museum of Modern Art’s 1985 exhibition, New Works on Paper 3. Steir’s large wave drawings comprise a distinct body of work from the mid 1980s, after which she began to experiment with the poured canvases that became waterfall paintings. Pat Steir is a celebrated American painter and printmaker, best known for her Waterfall paintings of dripped, splashed, and poured paint. This large work on paper completed in 1985 is characterized by her usual sense of spontaneity and unpredictability, embracing nature as an active force in art. Recalling the explosive power of waves, the work on paper references the art historical tradition of 19th century artists Ando Hiroshige and Gustave Courbet, re-imagining their previous depictions of the irrepressible sea. This drawing was featured in the Museum of Modern Art’s 1985 exhibition, New Works on Paper 3. Steir’s large wave drawings comprise a distinct body of work from the mid 1980s, after which she began to experiment with the poured canvases that became waterfall paintings. Pat Steir is a celebrated American painter and printmaker, best known for her Waterfall paintings of dripped, splashed, and poured paint. This large work on paper completed in 1985 is characterized by her usual sense of spontaneity and unpredictability, embracing nature as an active force in art. Recalling the explosive power of waves, the work on paper references the art historical tradition of 19th century artists Ando Hiroshige and Gustave Courbet, re-imagining their previous depictions of the irrepressible sea. This drawing was featured in the Museum of Modern Art’s 1985 exhibition, New Works on Paper 3. Steir’s large wave drawings comprise a distinct body of work from the mid 1980s, after which she began to experiment with the poured canvases that became waterfall paintings. Pat Steir is a celebrated American painter and printmaker, best known for her Waterfall paintings of dripped, splashed, and poured paint. This large work on paper completed in 1985 is characterized by her usual sense of spontaneity and unpredictability, embracing nature as an active force in art. Recalling the explosive power of waves, the work on paper references the art historical tradition of 19th century artists Ando Hiroshige and Gustave Courbet, re-imagining their previous depictions of the irrepressible sea. This drawing was featured in the Museum of Modern Art’s 1985 exhibition, New Works on Paper 3. Steir’s large wave drawings comprise a distinct body of work from the mid 1980s, after which she began to experiment with the poured canvases that became waterfall paintings.
Untitled (After Courbet and Hiroshige)198560 x 173 in. colored pencil, pencil, gesso and charcoal on paper
Provenance
Michael Klein, Inc., New York, acquired from the artist
Private Collection, New York
Private Collection, Boston
Literature
Illustrated in the catalog for "New Work on Paper 3", curated by Bernice Rose, June 27 – September 3, 1985, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY

125,000

Pat Steir is a celebrated American painter and printmaker, best known for her Waterfall paintings of dripped, splashed, and poured paint. This large work on paper completed in 1985 is characterized by her usual sense of spontaneity and unpredictability, embracing nature as an active force in art. Recalling the explosive power of waves, the work on paper references the art historical tradition of 19th century artists Ando Hiroshige and Gustave Courbet, re-imagining their previous depictions of the irrepressible sea. This drawing was featured in the Museum of Modern Art’s 1985 exhibition, New Works on Paper 3. Steir’s large wave drawings comprise a distinct body of work from the mid 1980s, after which she began to experiment with the poured canvases that became waterfall paintings.
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