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HASSEL SMITH (1915-2007)

 
HASSEL SMITH - Untitled - acrylic on canvas - 68 x 48 in. HASSEL SMITH - Untitled - acrylic on canvas - 68 x 48 in. HASSEL SMITH - Untitled - acrylic on canvas - 68 x 48 in. HASSEL SMITH - Untitled - acrylic on canvas - 68 x 48 in. HASSEL SMITH - Untitled - acrylic on canvas - 68 x 48 in. HASSEL SMITH - Untitled - acrylic on canvas - 68 x 48 in. HASSEL SMITH - Untitled - acrylic on canvas - 68 x 48 in. HASSEL SMITH - Untitled - acrylic on canvas - 68 x 48 in. HASSEL SMITH - Untitled - acrylic on canvas - 68 x 48 in.
Untitled198968 x 48 in. acrylic on canvas
Provenance
Estate of Hassel Smith

60,000

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This painting has remained in the same private collection since its creation.  Along with its companion work, "Untitled" (1991) was on display in the lobby of Chicago's Heller International Building at 500 West Monroe Street from the building's opening in 1992 until its renovation in 2015.
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<br>The November 2018 sale of Schnabel's "Large Rose Painting, (Near Van Gogh's Grave)" for $1.2 million at auction demonstrates a strong demand for the artist's work. This major sale was only the second-highest price paid for a Schnabel at auction: the record was set in November of 2017 when "Ethnic Type #14" sold for $1.4 million.  
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<br>A recent museum exhibition, "Julian Schnabel: Symbols of Actual Life" at the Legion of Honor, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, in 2018, featured several of Schnabel's large-scale paintings.

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Along with its companion work, "Untitled" (1991) was on display in the lobby of Chicago's Heller International Building at 500 West Monroe Street from the building's opening in 1992 until its renovation in 2015. This painting has remained in the same private collection since its creation.  
<br>
<br>The November 2018 sale of Schnabel's "Large Rose Painting, (Near Van Gogh's Grave)" for $1.2 million at auction demonstrates a strong demand for the artist's work. This major sale was only the second-highest price paid for a Schnabel at auction: the record was set in November of 2017 when "Ethnic Type #14" sold for $1.4 million.  
<br>
<br>A recent 2018 museum exhibition, "Julian Schnabel: Symbols of Actual Life" at the Legion of Honor, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, featured several of Schnabel's large-scale paintings.

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The only known extant Diebenkorn sculpture, this welded iron form is a brilliant example of his artistic development and the creative energy of his early work. 
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<br>This rare sculpture comes from a period of experimentation and a burst of lyrical creativity that the artist experienced while in graduate school at the University of New Mexico. It was likely included in his 1951 Master's Degree Exhibition at that institution. Like many American artists before him, Diebenkorn was enthralled with the atmosphere and landscape of the Southwest. He produced energetic and unpredictable canvases with bold, warm colors, barely contained within their underlying geometric structure. This iron sculpture demonstrates the far reaches of the artist’s exploration, establishing the essential linear framework that would come to characterize his later work. 
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<br>This piece was the only sculpture included in the 2008 exhibition "Diebenkorn in New Mexico" at the UNM Harwood Museum of Art in Taos. Since his first retrospective in 1976 at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, New York, Diebenkorn has found a place in over 50 museum collections worldwide and is recognized as a major creative force of the 20th Century.

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Alex Katz is a pivotal figure in American figurative art. His colorful, stylized, flat portraiture and paintings stand in stark contrast to the Abstract Expressionism in which he came of age. Not quite minimalist, his deadpan figures have qualities that also lends comparisons to pop culture and commercial design. This painting of a man playing the ukulele highlights the sort of gatherings of young people that would interest Katz giving both the sense of cool detachment but also cool hipness.

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RICHARD DIEBENKORN - Blue Surround - spit bite aquatint & drypoint aquatint on paper - paper: 35 x 26 1/4 in.

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Ed Ruscha is one of the most distinguished American artists due in part for his explorations of the symbols of Americana and the relationship between language and art. The End is a cinematic theme that the artist used in the 1990s and 2000s, appearing in paintings, prints, and drawings – notably the 1991 large-scale painting at the Museum of Modern Art. Addressing the passage of time and obsolescence, Ruscha makes use of an antiquated typeface and an old cinematic tradition of using text in film. The concept of ephemerality is enhanced by the words themselves, The End, and the nature of the medium itself; considered futuristic when it was developed in the 1960s, the laser technology for holograms also creates a sense of impermanence as the images change with the viewer’s movement. While there is innate movement in the shifting words and images, these holograms also represent a full stop – a transitory moment frozen in time.

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Donald Sultan’s Black and Blue from 2008 fits comfortably within both Pop art and Minimalism. The work is a sly reference to Warhol as if a polarized negative image of the Pop artist’s iconic Flower series. Working with unconventional use and application of paint, Sultan vacillates between abstraction and representational art, but always maintaining strong contrasts and powerful, simple statements. Sultan describes his work as "heavy structure, holding fragile meaning." Sultan’s work is represented in the permanent collections of many major museums in the United States and abroad, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Whitney Museum of American Art.

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