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RICHARD PRINCE (b. 1949)

 
In the late 1970s, Richard Prince began taking photographs of photographs, appropriation art in line with the readymades of Marcel Duchamp. Untitled (Portrait)(Boy) was included in the sensational 2014 Gagosian exhibition, New Portraits. For this series, Prince himself commented on each of the Instagram images and appropriated them for this body of work, creating a precise snapshot of our time. This work challenges ideas of authorship, capturing a sense of immediacy within the apparatus of social media. In the late 1970s, Richard Prince began taking photographs of photographs, appropriation art in line with the readymades of Marcel Duchamp. Untitled (Portrait)(Boy) was included in the sensational 2014 Gagosian exhibition, New Portraits. For this series, Prince himself commented on each of the Instagram images and appropriated them for this body of work, creating a precise snapshot of our time. This work challenges ideas of authorship, capturing a sense of immediacy within the apparatus of social media. In the late 1970s, Richard Prince began taking photographs of photographs, appropriation art in line with the readymades of Marcel Duchamp. Untitled (Portrait)(Boy) was included in the sensational 2014 Gagosian exhibition, New Portraits. For this series, Prince himself commented on each of the Instagram images and appropriated them for this body of work, creating a precise snapshot of our time. This work challenges ideas of authorship, capturing a sense of immediacy within the apparatus of social media. In the late 1970s, Richard Prince began taking photographs of photographs, appropriation art in line with the readymades of Marcel Duchamp. Untitled (Portrait)(Boy) was included in the sensational 2014 Gagosian exhibition, New Portraits. For this series, Prince himself commented on each of the Instagram images and appropriated them for this body of work, creating a precise snapshot of our time. This work challenges ideas of authorship, capturing a sense of immediacy within the apparatus of social media. In the late 1970s, Richard Prince began taking photographs of photographs, appropriation art in line with the readymades of Marcel Duchamp. Untitled (Portrait)(Boy) was included in the sensational 2014 Gagosian exhibition, New Portraits. For this series, Prince himself commented on each of the Instagram images and appropriated them for this body of work, creating a precise snapshot of our time. This work challenges ideas of authorship, capturing a sense of immediacy within the apparatus of social media. In the late 1970s, Richard Prince began taking photographs of photographs, appropriation art in line with the readymades of Marcel Duchamp. Untitled (Portrait)(Boy) was included in the sensational 2014 Gagosian exhibition, New Portraits. For this series, Prince himself commented on each of the Instagram images and appropriated them for this body of work, creating a precise snapshot of our time. This work challenges ideas of authorship, capturing a sense of immediacy within the apparatus of social media. In the late 1970s, Richard Prince began taking photographs of photographs, appropriation art in line with the readymades of Marcel Duchamp. Untitled (Portrait)(Boy) was included in the sensational 2014 Gagosian exhibition, New Portraits. For this series, Prince himself commented on each of the Instagram images and appropriated them for this body of work, creating a precise snapshot of our time. This work challenges ideas of authorship, capturing a sense of immediacy within the apparatus of social media. In the late 1970s, Richard Prince began taking photographs of photographs, appropriation art in line with the readymades of Marcel Duchamp. Untitled (Portrait)(Boy) was included in the sensational 2014 Gagosian exhibition, New Portraits. For this series, Prince himself commented on each of the Instagram images and appropriated them for this body of work, creating a precise snapshot of our time. This work challenges ideas of authorship, capturing a sense of immediacy within the apparatus of social media. In the late 1970s, Richard Prince began taking photographs of photographs, appropriation art in line with the readymades of Marcel Duchamp. Untitled (Portrait)(Boy) was included in the sensational 2014 Gagosian exhibition, New Portraits. For this series, Prince himself commented on each of the Instagram images and appropriated them for this body of work, creating a precise snapshot of our time. This work challenges ideas of authorship, capturing a sense of immediacy within the apparatus of social media. In the late 1970s, Richard Prince began taking photographs of photographs, appropriation art in line with the readymades of Marcel Duchamp. Untitled (Portrait)(Boy) was included in the sensational 2014 Gagosian exhibition, New Portraits. For this series, Prince himself commented on each of the Instagram images and appropriated them for this body of work, creating a precise snapshot of our time. This work challenges ideas of authorship, capturing a sense of immediacy within the apparatus of social media.
Untitled (Portrait)(Boy)201465 3/4 x 48 3/4 in. inkjet on canvas
Provenance
with Gagosian Gallery, New York;
Private Collection, New York, 2014, acquired from above
In the late 1970s, Richard Prince began taking photographs of photographs, appropriation art in line with the readymades of Marcel Duchamp. Untitled (Portrait)(Boy) was included in the sensational 2014 Gagosian exhibition, New Portraits. For this series, Prince himself commented on each of the Instagram images and appropriated them for this body of work, creating a precise snapshot of our time. This work challenges ideas of authorship, capturing a sense of immediacy within the apparatus of social media.
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