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MABEL MAY WOODWARD (1877-1945)

 
MABEL MAY WOODWARD - Beach Scene - watercolor on paper - 14 1/2 x 19 1/2 in. MABEL MAY WOODWARD - Beach Scene - watercolor on paper - 14 1/2 x 19 1/2 in. MABEL MAY WOODWARD - Beach Scene - watercolor on paper - 14 1/2 x 19 1/2 in. MABEL MAY WOODWARD - Beach Scene - watercolor on paper - 14 1/2 x 19 1/2 in. MABEL MAY WOODWARD - Beach Scene - watercolor on paper - 14 1/2 x 19 1/2 in. MABEL MAY WOODWARD - Beach Scene - watercolor on paper - 14 1/2 x 19 1/2 in. MABEL MAY WOODWARD - Beach Scene - watercolor on paper - 14 1/2 x 19 1/2 in. MABEL MAY WOODWARD - Beach Scene - watercolor on paper - 14 1/2 x 19 1/2 in. MABEL MAY WOODWARD - Beach Scene - watercolor on paper - 14 1/2 x 19 1/2 in.
Beach Scene14 1/2 x 19 1/2 in. watercolor on paper
Provenance
Christie's New York, 6 December 1991, Lot 200
Private Collection, Santa Barbara, California

50,000

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