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GUILLERMO KUITCA (b. 1961)

 
GUILLERMO KUITCA - Untitled - oil on plywood - 18 1/4 x 25 5/8 in. GUILLERMO KUITCA - Untitled - oil on plywood - 18 1/4 x 25 5/8 in. GUILLERMO KUITCA - Untitled - oil on plywood - 18 1/4 x 25 5/8 in. GUILLERMO KUITCA - Untitled - oil on plywood - 18 1/4 x 25 5/8 in. GUILLERMO KUITCA - Untitled - oil on plywood - 18 1/4 x 25 5/8 in. GUILLERMO KUITCA - Untitled - oil on plywood - 18 1/4 x 25 5/8 in. GUILLERMO KUITCA - Untitled - oil on plywood - 18 1/4 x 25 5/8 in. GUILLERMO KUITCA - Untitled - oil on plywood - 18 1/4 x 25 5/8 in. GUILLERMO KUITCA - Untitled - oil on plywood - 18 1/4 x 25 5/8 in.
Untitled201118 1/4 x 25 5/8 in. oil on plywood
Provenance
Hauser & Worth
Private Collection, California, 2011

65,000

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The stands are: The 32 H x 19-3/4 W x 19-3/4 D in.
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<br>Rat: 27 7/8 x 12 7/8 x 20 7/8 in.
<br>Ox: 29 1/8 x 20 1/8 x 16 7/8
<br>Tiger: 25 7/8 x 14 7/8 x 16 7/8
<br>Rabbit: 27 7/8 x 9 7/8 x 18 7/8
<br>Dragon: 35 7/8 x 18 1/8 x 25 7/8
<br>Snake: 27 7/8 x 14 1/8 x 6 3/4
<br>Horse: 29 1/8 x 12 1/4 x 22
<br>Ram: 25 1/4 x 20 7/8 x 16 1/8
<br>Monkey: 27 1/8 x 12 7/8 x 14 7/8
<br>Rooster: 24 x 9 x 16 7/8
<br>Dog: 25 1/4 x 14 7/8 x 18 7/8
<br>Boar: 27 1/8 x 16 1/8 x 20 7/8

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<br>The imagery of the paintings reference sections of the US-Mexico border captured by satellite photography. Viewed from this perspective, regional landscapes are flattened into ambiguous areas of varying shape, color and tone. These types of surfaces, comparable to those found in post-war abstract painting, are re-contextualized through de los Reyes’ saturation of unprimed linen with multiple layers of fabric dyes. Above these fields of color, de los Reyes superimposes demarcations in oil, either through the use of singular, thin lines or gridded expanses of marks which explicitly refer to locations along the US-Mexico border. The resulting works imply how our perception of space, and the process of its utilization, forms the basis for both personal and political consciousness.

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