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ELLSWORTH KELLY (1923-2015)

 
ELLSWORTH KELLY - Pears III, (A.47) - lithograph - 35 3/4 x 24 1/2 in. ELLSWORTH KELLY - Pears III, (A.47) - lithograph - 35 3/4 x 24 1/2 in. ELLSWORTH KELLY - Pears III, (A.47) - lithograph - 35 3/4 x 24 1/2 in. ELLSWORTH KELLY - Pears III, (A.47) - lithograph - 35 3/4 x 24 1/2 in. ELLSWORTH KELLY - Pears III, (A.47) - lithograph - 35 3/4 x 24 1/2 in. ELLSWORTH KELLY - Pears III, (A.47) - lithograph - 35 3/4 x 24 1/2 in. ELLSWORTH KELLY - Pears III, (A.47) - lithograph - 35 3/4 x 24 1/2 in. ELLSWORTH KELLY - Pears III, (A.47) - lithograph - 35 3/4 x 24 1/2 in. ELLSWORTH KELLY - Pears III, (A.47) - lithograph - 35 3/4 x 24 1/2 in.
Pears III, (A.47)1965-6635 3/4 x 24 1/2 in. lithograph
Provenance
Private Collection, California

22,000

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