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WINSLOW HOMER (1836-1910)

 
"The Busy Bee" (1875), demonstrates Homer's influential excellence in watercolor. He began working in the medium in 1873, painting scenes of children and the daily lives of everyday people. Homer's prolific work in watercolor helped to establish it as a serious artistic medium.
<br>
<br>This piece is from the reconstruction era and depicts a single figure. The boy depicted in "The Busy Bee" is a model that appears repeatedly in Homer's work from this period, including some of the most widely celebrated reconstruction era paintings like "Dressing for the Carnival" (1877) at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Nearly all of Homer’s works from the reconstruction era south are in museum collections. Another painting of the same model, "Taking Sunflower to Teacher" (1875), is in the Georgia Museum of Art.
<br>
<br>This work is available from a private collection where it has stayed for the last 25 years. It has been exhibited widely beginning in 1876 at the National Academy of Design in New York and going on to be exhibited throughout the 20th century at major American museums such as The Metropolitan Museum in New York, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and The Amon Carter Museum of American Art in Fort Worth, Texas. "The Busy Bee" (1875), demonstrates Homer's influential excellence in watercolor. He began working in the medium in 1873, painting scenes of children and the daily lives of everyday people. Homer's prolific work in watercolor helped to establish it as a serious artistic medium.
<br>
<br>This piece is from the reconstruction era and depicts a single figure. The boy depicted in "The Busy Bee" is a model that appears repeatedly in Homer's work from this period, including some of the most widely celebrated reconstruction era paintings like "Dressing for the Carnival" (1877) at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Nearly all of Homer’s works from the reconstruction era south are in museum collections. Another painting of the same model, "Taking Sunflower to Teacher" (1875), is in the Georgia Museum of Art.
<br>
<br>This work is available from a private collection where it has stayed for the last 25 years. It has been exhibited widely beginning in 1876 at the National Academy of Design in New York and going on to be exhibited throughout the 20th century at major American museums such as The Metropolitan Museum in New York, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and The Amon Carter Museum of American Art in Fort Worth, Texas. "The Busy Bee" (1875), demonstrates Homer's influential excellence in watercolor. He began working in the medium in 1873, painting scenes of children and the daily lives of everyday people. Homer's prolific work in watercolor helped to establish it as a serious artistic medium.
<br>
<br>This piece is from the reconstruction era and depicts a single figure. The boy depicted in "The Busy Bee" is a model that appears repeatedly in Homer's work from this period, including some of the most widely celebrated reconstruction era paintings like "Dressing for the Carnival" (1877) at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Nearly all of Homer’s works from the reconstruction era south are in museum collections. Another painting of the same model, "Taking Sunflower to Teacher" (1875), is in the Georgia Museum of Art.
<br>
<br>This work is available from a private collection where it has stayed for the last 25 years. It has been exhibited widely beginning in 1876 at the National Academy of Design in New York and going on to be exhibited throughout the 20th century at major American museums such as The Metropolitan Museum in New York, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and The Amon Carter Museum of American Art in Fort Worth, Texas. "The Busy Bee" (1875), demonstrates Homer's influential excellence in watercolor. He began working in the medium in 1873, painting scenes of children and the daily lives of everyday people. Homer's prolific work in watercolor helped to establish it as a serious artistic medium.
<br>
<br>This piece is from the reconstruction era and depicts a single figure. The boy depicted in "The Busy Bee" is a model that appears repeatedly in Homer's work from this period, including some of the most widely celebrated reconstruction era paintings like "Dressing for the Carnival" (1877) at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Nearly all of Homer’s works from the reconstruction era south are in museum collections. Another painting of the same model, "Taking Sunflower to Teacher" (1875), is in the Georgia Museum of Art.
<br>
<br>This work is available from a private collection where it has stayed for the last 25 years. It has been exhibited widely beginning in 1876 at the National Academy of Design in New York and going on to be exhibited throughout the 20th century at major American museums such as The Metropolitan Museum in New York, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and The Amon Carter Museum of American Art in Fort Worth, Texas. "The Busy Bee" (1875), demonstrates Homer's influential excellence in watercolor. He began working in the medium in 1873, painting scenes of children and the daily lives of everyday people. Homer's prolific work in watercolor helped to establish it as a serious artistic medium.
<br>
<br>This piece is from the reconstruction era and depicts a single figure. The boy depicted in "The Busy Bee" is a model that appears repeatedly in Homer's work from this period, including some of the most widely celebrated reconstruction era paintings like "Dressing for the Carnival" (1877) at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Nearly all of Homer’s works from the reconstruction era south are in museum collections. Another painting of the same model, "Taking Sunflower to Teacher" (1875), is in the Georgia Museum of Art.
<br>
<br>This work is available from a private collection where it has stayed for the last 25 years. It has been exhibited widely beginning in 1876 at the National Academy of Design in New York and going on to be exhibited throughout the 20th century at major American museums such as The Metropolitan Museum in New York, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and The Amon Carter Museum of American Art in Fort Worth, Texas. "The Busy Bee" (1875), demonstrates Homer's influential excellence in watercolor. He began working in the medium in 1873, painting scenes of children and the daily lives of everyday people. Homer's prolific work in watercolor helped to establish it as a serious artistic medium.
<br>
<br>This piece is from the reconstruction era and depicts a single figure. The boy depicted in "The Busy Bee" is a model that appears repeatedly in Homer's work from this period, including some of the most widely celebrated reconstruction era paintings like "Dressing for the Carnival" (1877) at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Nearly all of Homer’s works from the reconstruction era south are in museum collections. Another painting of the same model, "Taking Sunflower to Teacher" (1875), is in the Georgia Museum of Art.
<br>
<br>This work is available from a private collection where it has stayed for the last 25 years. It has been exhibited widely beginning in 1876 at the National Academy of Design in New York and going on to be exhibited throughout the 20th century at major American museums such as The Metropolitan Museum in New York, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and The Amon Carter Museum of American Art in Fort Worth, Texas. "The Busy Bee" (1875), demonstrates Homer's influential excellence in watercolor. He began working in the medium in 1873, painting scenes of children and the daily lives of everyday people. Homer's prolific work in watercolor helped to establish it as a serious artistic medium.
<br>
<br>This piece is from the reconstruction era and depicts a single figure. The boy depicted in "The Busy Bee" is a model that appears repeatedly in Homer's work from this period, including some of the most widely celebrated reconstruction era paintings like "Dressing for the Carnival" (1877) at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Nearly all of Homer’s works from the reconstruction era south are in museum collections. Another painting of the same model, "Taking Sunflower to Teacher" (1875), is in the Georgia Museum of Art.
<br>
<br>This work is available from a private collection where it has stayed for the last 25 years. It has been exhibited widely beginning in 1876 at the National Academy of Design in New York and going on to be exhibited throughout the 20th century at major American museums such as The Metropolitan Museum in New York, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and The Amon Carter Museum of American Art in Fort Worth, Texas. "The Busy Bee" (1875), demonstrates Homer's influential excellence in watercolor. He began working in the medium in 1873, painting scenes of children and the daily lives of everyday people. Homer's prolific work in watercolor helped to establish it as a serious artistic medium.
<br>
<br>This piece is from the reconstruction era and depicts a single figure. The boy depicted in "The Busy Bee" is a model that appears repeatedly in Homer's work from this period, including some of the most widely celebrated reconstruction era paintings like "Dressing for the Carnival" (1877) at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Nearly all of Homer’s works from the reconstruction era south are in museum collections. Another painting of the same model, "Taking Sunflower to Teacher" (1875), is in the Georgia Museum of Art.
<br>
<br>This work is available from a private collection where it has stayed for the last 25 years. It has been exhibited widely beginning in 1876 at the National Academy of Design in New York and going on to be exhibited throughout the 20th century at major American museums such as The Metropolitan Museum in New York, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and The Amon Carter Museum of American Art in Fort Worth, Texas. "The Busy Bee" (1875), demonstrates Homer's influential excellence in watercolor. He began working in the medium in 1873, painting scenes of children and the daily lives of everyday people. Homer's prolific work in watercolor helped to establish it as a serious artistic medium.
<br>
<br>This piece is from the reconstruction era and depicts a single figure. The boy depicted in "The Busy Bee" is a model that appears repeatedly in Homer's work from this period, including some of the most widely celebrated reconstruction era paintings like "Dressing for the Carnival" (1877) at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Nearly all of Homer’s works from the reconstruction era south are in museum collections. Another painting of the same model, "Taking Sunflower to Teacher" (1875), is in the Georgia Museum of Art.
<br>
<br>This work is available from a private collection where it has stayed for the last 25 years. It has been exhibited widely beginning in 1876 at the National Academy of Design in New York and going on to be exhibited throughout the 20th century at major American museums such as The Metropolitan Museum in New York, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and The Amon Carter Museum of American Art in Fort Worth, Texas. "The Busy Bee" (1875), demonstrates Homer's influential excellence in watercolor. He began working in the medium in 1873, painting scenes of children and the daily lives of everyday people. Homer's prolific work in watercolor helped to establish it as a serious artistic medium.
<br>
<br>This piece is from the reconstruction era and depicts a single figure. The boy depicted in "The Busy Bee" is a model that appears repeatedly in Homer's work from this period, including some of the most widely celebrated reconstruction era paintings like "Dressing for the Carnival" (1877) at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Nearly all of Homer’s works from the reconstruction era south are in museum collections. Another painting of the same model, "Taking Sunflower to Teacher" (1875), is in the Georgia Museum of Art.
<br>
<br>This work is available from a private collection where it has stayed for the last 25 years. It has been exhibited widely beginning in 1876 at the National Academy of Design in New York and going on to be exhibited throughout the 20th century at major American museums such as The Metropolitan Museum in New York, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and The Amon Carter Museum of American Art in Fort Worth, Texas.
The Busy Bee187510 x 9 1/4 in. watercolor and gouache on paper
Provenance
William Crowninshield Rogers, Boston until 1888
William B. Rogers, Sherborn, Massachusetts until 1938, by descent from above
Susan E. Rogers (Mrs. David H. Maynard), Dedham, Massachusetts, by descent from above
Samuel Haydock, Dedham, Massachusetts, John P. Maynard, Dover, Massachusetts and Mrs. Hope M. Reichl, Burlington, Vermont, by joint descent in the family
The Putnam Foundation, Timkin Art Gallery San Diego, 1964
William Crowninshield Rogers, Boston until 1888
By descent to his son, William B. Rogers, Sherborn, Massachusetts until 1938
By descent to his daughter, Susan E. Rogers (Mrs. David H. Maynard), Dedham, Massachusetts
By joint descent to Samuel Haydock, Dedham, Massachusetts, John P, Maynard,
...More... Dover, Massachusetts, and Hope M. Reichl, Burlington, Vermont
The Putman Foundation, Timken Art Gallery, San Diego, 1964
Berry-Hill Galleries, New York
Private Collection, California, 1995
Literature
National Academy of Design 1876 Official Catalogue, Department  of Art, p.26, no. 522C
Whitney Museum of Art, catalogue no. 18, p. 70 (reproduced)
National Gallery of Art, 1986 catalogue buy Helen Cooper, pp. 34-36, 245, p. 35, fig. 21
The Menil Collection, 1989 catalogue no. 18, pp. 72-73 (reproduced)
The Corcoran Gallery of Art, 1990 catalogue, p. 79 (reproduced)
"Watercolor Exhibition," The New York Times, February 13, 1876, p.10
"Fine Arts Ninth Exhibition of the Water Color Society," The Nation, Vol. 22, February 17, 1876, p. 120
William Downes, "The Life and Works of Winslow Homer," 1911, p.81
Karen M. Adams, "Black Images in Nineteenth-Century American Paintings and Literature: An Iconological Study of Mount, Melville, Home,r and Mark Twain" (Ph. D. dissertation, Emory University, 1977), p. 128, fig. 49
Timken Art Gallery, "American Paintings in the Collection of the Putnam Foundation," San Diego, 1977, p. 8 (reproduced)
Kathleen Adair Foster, "Makers of the American Watercolor Movement: 1860-1890," ph.D dissertation, Yale University, 1982, vol. 1, p.77
Michael Quick, "Homer in Virginia," Los Angeles County Museum of Art Bulletin 1978, Vol. XXIV, pp. 74-75, fig. 24
Gordon Hendricks, The Life and Work of Winslow Homer, New York, 1979, pp.104, 279
Timken Art Gallery, "European and American Works of Art in the Putnam Foundation Collection," San Diego, 1983, pp. 100-101, no. 37 (reproduced)
Mary Ann Calo, "Winslow Homer's Visits to Virginia During the Reconstruction," The American Art Journal, Vol. XII, no. 1, Winter 1980, pp. 9-10, 13, fog. 12
Guy C. McElroy, "Facing History: The Black Image in American Art," San Francisco: Bedford Arts Publishers, with the Corcoran Gallery of Art, 1990, pp. 78-79 (reproduced)
 
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"The Busy Bee" (1875), demonstrates Homer's influential excellence in watercolor. He began working in the medium in 1873, painting scenes of children and the daily lives of everyday people. Homer's prolific work in watercolor helped to establish it as a serious artistic medium.

This piece is from the reconstruction era and depicts a single figure. The boy depicted in "The Busy Bee" is a model that appears repeatedly in Homer's work from this period, including some of the most widely celebrated reconstruction era paintings like "Dressing for the Carnival" (1877) at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Nearly all of Homer’s works from the reconstruction era south are in museum collections. Another painting of the same model, "Taking Sunflower to Teacher" (1875), is in the Georgia Museum of Art.

This work is available from a private collection where it has stayed for the last 25 years. It has been exhibited widely beginning in 1876 at the National Academy of Design in New York and going on to be exhibited throughout the 20th century at major American museums such as The Metropolitan Museum in New York, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and The Amon Carter Museum of American Art in Fort Worth, Texas.
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