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AARON CURRY

 
Aaron Curry's sculptural work adapts planar forms into a 3-dimensional surface, reminiscent of the large civic sculpture of Alexander Calder. Curry views his work as representing some aspect of life, even if it is abstract -- the human body and the guitar are cited as two of his favorite sources of inspiration.
<br>
<br>"Yellow Bird Boy" (2010) measures nearly 10 feet tall and is among the largest of Curry's sculptures. Curry sees the viewer and sculpture's interaction as critical, exploring the relationship of scale between the human body and his large sculptures.    
<br>
<br>The 2018 solo exhibition of Curry's work at the Bass Museum of Art, Miami, and the 2019 exhibition at the McNay Art Museum, San Antonio, were well received by visitors and critics alike. Curry is represented in several important museum collections worldwide including, High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. Aaron Curry's sculptural work adapts planar forms into a 3-dimensional surface, reminiscent of the large civic sculpture of Alexander Calder. Curry views his work as representing some aspect of life, even if it is abstract -- the human body and the guitar are cited as two of his favorite sources of inspiration.
<br>
<br>"Yellow Bird Boy" (2010) measures nearly 10 feet tall and is among the largest of Curry's sculptures. Curry sees the viewer and sculpture's interaction as critical, exploring the relationship of scale between the human body and his large sculptures.    
<br>
<br>The 2018 solo exhibition of Curry's work at the Bass Museum of Art, Miami, and the 2019 exhibition at the McNay Art Museum, San Antonio, were well received by visitors and critics alike. Curry is represented in several important museum collections worldwide including, High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. Aaron Curry's sculptural work adapts planar forms into a 3-dimensional surface, reminiscent of the large civic sculpture of Alexander Calder. Curry views his work as representing some aspect of life, even if it is abstract -- the human body and the guitar are cited as two of his favorite sources of inspiration.
<br>
<br>"Yellow Bird Boy" (2010) measures nearly 10 feet tall and is among the largest of Curry's sculptures. Curry sees the viewer and sculpture's interaction as critical, exploring the relationship of scale between the human body and his large sculptures.    
<br>
<br>The 2018 solo exhibition of Curry's work at the Bass Museum of Art, Miami, and the 2019 exhibition at the McNay Art Museum, San Antonio, were well received by visitors and critics alike. Curry is represented in several important museum collections worldwide including, High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. Aaron Curry's sculptural work adapts planar forms into a 3-dimensional surface, reminiscent of the large civic sculpture of Alexander Calder. Curry views his work as representing some aspect of life, even if it is abstract -- the human body and the guitar are cited as two of his favorite sources of inspiration.
<br>
<br>"Yellow Bird Boy" (2010) measures nearly 10 feet tall and is among the largest of Curry's sculptures. Curry sees the viewer and sculpture's interaction as critical, exploring the relationship of scale between the human body and his large sculptures.    
<br>
<br>The 2018 solo exhibition of Curry's work at the Bass Museum of Art, Miami, and the 2019 exhibition at the McNay Art Museum, San Antonio, were well received by visitors and critics alike. Curry is represented in several important museum collections worldwide including, High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. Aaron Curry's sculptural work adapts planar forms into a 3-dimensional surface, reminiscent of the large civic sculpture of Alexander Calder. Curry views his work as representing some aspect of life, even if it is abstract -- the human body and the guitar are cited as two of his favorite sources of inspiration.
<br>
<br>"Yellow Bird Boy" (2010) measures nearly 10 feet tall and is among the largest of Curry's sculptures. Curry sees the viewer and sculpture's interaction as critical, exploring the relationship of scale between the human body and his large sculptures.    
<br>
<br>The 2018 solo exhibition of Curry's work at the Bass Museum of Art, Miami, and the 2019 exhibition at the McNay Art Museum, San Antonio, were well received by visitors and critics alike. Curry is represented in several important museum collections worldwide including, High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. Aaron Curry's sculptural work adapts planar forms into a 3-dimensional surface, reminiscent of the large civic sculpture of Alexander Calder. Curry views his work as representing some aspect of life, even if it is abstract -- the human body and the guitar are cited as two of his favorite sources of inspiration.
<br>
<br>"Yellow Bird Boy" (2010) measures nearly 10 feet tall and is among the largest of Curry's sculptures. Curry sees the viewer and sculpture's interaction as critical, exploring the relationship of scale between the human body and his large sculptures.    
<br>
<br>The 2018 solo exhibition of Curry's work at the Bass Museum of Art, Miami, and the 2019 exhibition at the McNay Art Museum, San Antonio, were well received by visitors and critics alike. Curry is represented in several important museum collections worldwide including, High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. Aaron Curry's sculptural work adapts planar forms into a 3-dimensional surface, reminiscent of the large civic sculpture of Alexander Calder. Curry views his work as representing some aspect of life, even if it is abstract -- the human body and the guitar are cited as two of his favorite sources of inspiration.
<br>
<br>"Yellow Bird Boy" (2010) measures nearly 10 feet tall and is among the largest of Curry's sculptures. Curry sees the viewer and sculpture's interaction as critical, exploring the relationship of scale between the human body and his large sculptures.    
<br>
<br>The 2018 solo exhibition of Curry's work at the Bass Museum of Art, Miami, and the 2019 exhibition at the McNay Art Museum, San Antonio, were well received by visitors and critics alike. Curry is represented in several important museum collections worldwide including, High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. Aaron Curry's sculptural work adapts planar forms into a 3-dimensional surface, reminiscent of the large civic sculpture of Alexander Calder. Curry views his work as representing some aspect of life, even if it is abstract -- the human body and the guitar are cited as two of his favorite sources of inspiration.
<br>
<br>"Yellow Bird Boy" (2010) measures nearly 10 feet tall and is among the largest of Curry's sculptures. Curry sees the viewer and sculpture's interaction as critical, exploring the relationship of scale between the human body and his large sculptures.    
<br>
<br>The 2018 solo exhibition of Curry's work at the Bass Museum of Art, Miami, and the 2019 exhibition at the McNay Art Museum, San Antonio, were well received by visitors and critics alike. Curry is represented in several important museum collections worldwide including, High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. Aaron Curry's sculptural work adapts planar forms into a 3-dimensional surface, reminiscent of the large civic sculpture of Alexander Calder. Curry views his work as representing some aspect of life, even if it is abstract -- the human body and the guitar are cited as two of his favorite sources of inspiration.
<br>
<br>"Yellow Bird Boy" (2010) measures nearly 10 feet tall and is among the largest of Curry's sculptures. Curry sees the viewer and sculpture's interaction as critical, exploring the relationship of scale between the human body and his large sculptures.    
<br>
<br>The 2018 solo exhibition of Curry's work at the Bass Museum of Art, Miami, and the 2019 exhibition at the McNay Art Museum, San Antonio, were well received by visitors and critics alike. Curry is represented in several important museum collections worldwide including, High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. Aaron Curry's sculptural work adapts planar forms into a 3-dimensional surface, reminiscent of the large civic sculpture of Alexander Calder. Curry views his work as representing some aspect of life, even if it is abstract -- the human body and the guitar are cited as two of his favorite sources of inspiration.
<br>
<br>"Yellow Bird Boy" (2010) measures nearly 10 feet tall and is among the largest of Curry's sculptures. Curry sees the viewer and sculpture's interaction as critical, exploring the relationship of scale between the human body and his large sculptures.    
<br>
<br>The 2018 solo exhibition of Curry's work at the Bass Museum of Art, Miami, and the 2019 exhibition at the McNay Art Museum, San Antonio, were well received by visitors and critics alike. Curry is represented in several important museum collections worldwide including, High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles.
Yellow Bird Boy2010114 x 97 x 60 in.(289.56 x 246.38 x 152.4 cm) powder-coated aluminum and steel
Provenance
Michael Werner Gallery, New York
Private Collection, Idaho, 2010
Literature
Nancy Princenthal, “Sculpture in a contracted Field,” Art in America, October 2010, pg. 164
Aaron Curry's sculptural work adapts planar forms into a 3-dimensional surface, reminiscent of the large civic sculpture of Alexander Calder. Curry views his work as representing some aspect of life, even if it is abstract -- the human body and the guitar are cited as two of his favorite sources of inspiration.

"Yellow Bird Boy" (2010) measures nearly 10 feet tall and is among the largest of Curry's sculptures. Curry sees the viewer and sculpture's interaction as critical, exploring the relationship of scale between the human body and his large sculptures.

The 2018 solo exhibition of Curry's work at the Bass Museum of Art, Miami, and the 2019 exhibition at the McNay Art Museum, San Antonio, were well received by visitors and critics alike. Curry is represented in several important museum collections worldwide including, High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles.
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