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HENRI MANGUIN (1874-1949)

 
"Bouquets de Fleurs" (1901) is a glowing Post-Impressionist still life. As the revolutionary wave of Impressionism receded from its apex, artists such as Henri Manguin, Henri Matisse, Kees van Dongen, Louis Valtat, and others emerged as part of the new avant-garde in Europe. These “Fauves,” or roughly translated “wild beasts,” would attack their canvases with a bold and vibrant new palette. This completely new way of painting was not initially celebrated by critics, or the artistic elite, but is today recognized among the most innovative and original artistic movements of the 20th Century.    
<br>
<br>The present work, painted just before the revolution of Fauvism took hold, demonstrates a critical transitionary period in Modern Art. The subject is depicted with a masterful compositional sense and attention to spatial relationships. Manguin’s competency in composition would allow him to experiment freely with color during the first decade of the 20th Century. The slightly later but comparable Manguin still life “Flowers” (1915) is in the permanent collection of the Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia. "Bouquets de Fleurs" (1901) is a glowing Post-Impressionist still life. As the revolutionary wave of Impressionism receded from its apex, artists such as Henri Manguin, Henri Matisse, Kees van Dongen, Louis Valtat, and others emerged as part of the new avant-garde in Europe. These “Fauves,” or roughly translated “wild beasts,” would attack their canvases with a bold and vibrant new palette. This completely new way of painting was not initially celebrated by critics, or the artistic elite, but is today recognized among the most innovative and original artistic movements of the 20th Century.    
<br>
<br>The present work, painted just before the revolution of Fauvism took hold, demonstrates a critical transitionary period in Modern Art. The subject is depicted with a masterful compositional sense and attention to spatial relationships. Manguin’s competency in composition would allow him to experiment freely with color during the first decade of the 20th Century. The slightly later but comparable Manguin still life “Flowers” (1915) is in the permanent collection of the Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia. "Bouquets de Fleurs" (1901) is a glowing Post-Impressionist still life. As the revolutionary wave of Impressionism receded from its apex, artists such as Henri Manguin, Henri Matisse, Kees van Dongen, Louis Valtat, and others emerged as part of the new avant-garde in Europe. These “Fauves,” or roughly translated “wild beasts,” would attack their canvases with a bold and vibrant new palette. This completely new way of painting was not initially celebrated by critics, or the artistic elite, but is today recognized among the most innovative and original artistic movements of the 20th Century.    
<br>
<br>The present work, painted just before the revolution of Fauvism took hold, demonstrates a critical transitionary period in Modern Art. The subject is depicted with a masterful compositional sense and attention to spatial relationships. Manguin’s competency in composition would allow him to experiment freely with color during the first decade of the 20th Century. The slightly later but comparable Manguin still life “Flowers” (1915) is in the permanent collection of the Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia. "Bouquets de Fleurs" (1901) is a glowing Post-Impressionist still life. As the revolutionary wave of Impressionism receded from its apex, artists such as Henri Manguin, Henri Matisse, Kees van Dongen, Louis Valtat, and others emerged as part of the new avant-garde in Europe. These “Fauves,” or roughly translated “wild beasts,” would attack their canvases with a bold and vibrant new palette. This completely new way of painting was not initially celebrated by critics, or the artistic elite, but is today recognized among the most innovative and original artistic movements of the 20th Century.    
<br>
<br>The present work, painted just before the revolution of Fauvism took hold, demonstrates a critical transitionary period in Modern Art. The subject is depicted with a masterful compositional sense and attention to spatial relationships. Manguin’s competency in composition would allow him to experiment freely with color during the first decade of the 20th Century. The slightly later but comparable Manguin still life “Flowers” (1915) is in the permanent collection of the Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia. "Bouquets de Fleurs" (1901) is a glowing Post-Impressionist still life. As the revolutionary wave of Impressionism receded from its apex, artists such as Henri Manguin, Henri Matisse, Kees van Dongen, Louis Valtat, and others emerged as part of the new avant-garde in Europe. These “Fauves,” or roughly translated “wild beasts,” would attack their canvases with a bold and vibrant new palette. This completely new way of painting was not initially celebrated by critics, or the artistic elite, but is today recognized among the most innovative and original artistic movements of the 20th Century.    
<br>
<br>The present work, painted just before the revolution of Fauvism took hold, demonstrates a critical transitionary period in Modern Art. The subject is depicted with a masterful compositional sense and attention to spatial relationships. Manguin’s competency in composition would allow him to experiment freely with color during the first decade of the 20th Century. The slightly later but comparable Manguin still life “Flowers” (1915) is in the permanent collection of the Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia. "Bouquets de Fleurs" (1901) is a glowing Post-Impressionist still life. As the revolutionary wave of Impressionism receded from its apex, artists such as Henri Manguin, Henri Matisse, Kees van Dongen, Louis Valtat, and others emerged as part of the new avant-garde in Europe. These “Fauves,” or roughly translated “wild beasts,” would attack their canvases with a bold and vibrant new palette. This completely new way of painting was not initially celebrated by critics, or the artistic elite, but is today recognized among the most innovative and original artistic movements of the 20th Century.    
<br>
<br>The present work, painted just before the revolution of Fauvism took hold, demonstrates a critical transitionary period in Modern Art. The subject is depicted with a masterful compositional sense and attention to spatial relationships. Manguin’s competency in composition would allow him to experiment freely with color during the first decade of the 20th Century. The slightly later but comparable Manguin still life “Flowers” (1915) is in the permanent collection of the Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia. "Bouquets de Fleurs" (1901) is a glowing Post-Impressionist still life. As the revolutionary wave of Impressionism receded from its apex, artists such as Henri Manguin, Henri Matisse, Kees van Dongen, Louis Valtat, and others emerged as part of the new avant-garde in Europe. These “Fauves,” or roughly translated “wild beasts,” would attack their canvases with a bold and vibrant new palette. This completely new way of painting was not initially celebrated by critics, or the artistic elite, but is today recognized among the most innovative and original artistic movements of the 20th Century.    
<br>
<br>The present work, painted just before the revolution of Fauvism took hold, demonstrates a critical transitionary period in Modern Art. The subject is depicted with a masterful compositional sense and attention to spatial relationships. Manguin’s competency in composition would allow him to experiment freely with color during the first decade of the 20th Century. The slightly later but comparable Manguin still life “Flowers” (1915) is in the permanent collection of the Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia. "Bouquets de Fleurs" (1901) is a glowing Post-Impressionist still life. As the revolutionary wave of Impressionism receded from its apex, artists such as Henri Manguin, Henri Matisse, Kees van Dongen, Louis Valtat, and others emerged as part of the new avant-garde in Europe. These “Fauves,” or roughly translated “wild beasts,” would attack their canvases with a bold and vibrant new palette. This completely new way of painting was not initially celebrated by critics, or the artistic elite, but is today recognized among the most innovative and original artistic movements of the 20th Century.    
<br>
<br>The present work, painted just before the revolution of Fauvism took hold, demonstrates a critical transitionary period in Modern Art. The subject is depicted with a masterful compositional sense and attention to spatial relationships. Manguin’s competency in composition would allow him to experiment freely with color during the first decade of the 20th Century. The slightly later but comparable Manguin still life “Flowers” (1915) is in the permanent collection of the Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia. "Bouquets de Fleurs" (1901) is a glowing Post-Impressionist still life. As the revolutionary wave of Impressionism receded from its apex, artists such as Henri Manguin, Henri Matisse, Kees van Dongen, Louis Valtat, and others emerged as part of the new avant-garde in Europe. These “Fauves,” or roughly translated “wild beasts,” would attack their canvases with a bold and vibrant new palette. This completely new way of painting was not initially celebrated by critics, or the artistic elite, but is today recognized among the most innovative and original artistic movements of the 20th Century.    
<br>
<br>The present work, painted just before the revolution of Fauvism took hold, demonstrates a critical transitionary period in Modern Art. The subject is depicted with a masterful compositional sense and attention to spatial relationships. Manguin’s competency in composition would allow him to experiment freely with color during the first decade of the 20th Century. The slightly later but comparable Manguin still life “Flowers” (1915) is in the permanent collection of the Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia. "Bouquets de Fleurs" (1901) is a glowing Post-Impressionist still life. As the revolutionary wave of Impressionism receded from its apex, artists such as Henri Manguin, Henri Matisse, Kees van Dongen, Louis Valtat, and others emerged as part of the new avant-garde in Europe. These “Fauves,” or roughly translated “wild beasts,” would attack their canvases with a bold and vibrant new palette. This completely new way of painting was not initially celebrated by critics, or the artistic elite, but is today recognized among the most innovative and original artistic movements of the 20th Century.    
<br>
<br>The present work, painted just before the revolution of Fauvism took hold, demonstrates a critical transitionary period in Modern Art. The subject is depicted with a masterful compositional sense and attention to spatial relationships. Manguin’s competency in composition would allow him to experiment freely with color during the first decade of the 20th Century. The slightly later but comparable Manguin still life “Flowers” (1915) is in the permanent collection of the Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia.
Bouquets de Fleurs190125 7/8 x 21 5/8 in.(70.8 x 54.93 cm) oil on canvas
Provenance
Offered by Henri Manguin to his sister Adrienne Lamarre, Paris 1901
Henri Lamarre, Paris
Private Collection, France, c. 1960
DROUOT-RICHELIEU, Paris, France on Dec 5, 1986, Lot #76
Private Collection, France
 
 

150,000

"Bouquets de Fleurs" (1901) is a glowing Post-Impressionist still life. As the revolutionary wave of Impressionism receded from its apex, artists such as Henri Manguin, Henri Matisse, Kees van Dongen, Louis Valtat, and others emerged as part of the new avant-garde in Europe. These “Fauves,” or roughly translated “wild beasts,” would attack their canvases with a bold and vibrant new palette. This completely new way of painting was not initially celebrated by critics, or the artistic elite, but is today recognized among the most innovative and original artistic movements of the 20th Century.

The present work, painted just before the revolution of Fauvism took hold, demonstrates a critical transitionary period in Modern Art. The subject is depicted with a masterful compositional sense and attention to spatial relationships. Manguin’s competency in composition would allow him to experiment freely with color during the first decade of the 20th Century. The slightly later but comparable Manguin still life “Flowers” (1915) is in the permanent collection of the Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia.
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