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OSWALDO GUAYASAMIN (1919-1999)

 
Ecuadorian painter Oswaldo Guayasamin creates intense and captivating images that demand a response from the viewer. His long career has explored themes from the atrocities of World War II and the Spanish Civil War, to the plight of indigenous peoples of the Andes. His work has received awards at biennials in Mexico, São Paulo, and Barcelona, and has been exhibited worldwide at prestigious institutions such as the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Madrid, the Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, the Museo de Arte Moderno de México, and the Hermitage in St. Petersburg among many others. In 2009, the Museum of Lain American Art in Long Beach, California, presented a survey exhibition of his work, entitled “Of Rage and Redemption: The Art of Oswaldo Guayasamin.”
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<br>“Atahualpa en Cajamarcas” is a strong example of Guayasamin’s Cubist-styled portraits. Here, he depicts the Inca ruler who was captured by Spanish forces in Cajamarca, leading to the fall of the Inca Empire. Guayasamin's best-known works are marked by this expressive representation of struggle, tragedy, and humanity. Ecuadorian painter Oswaldo Guayasamin creates intense and captivating images that demand a response from the viewer. His long career has explored themes from the atrocities of World War II and the Spanish Civil War, to the plight of indigenous peoples of the Andes. His work has received awards at biennials in Mexico, São Paulo, and Barcelona, and has been exhibited worldwide at prestigious institutions such as the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Madrid, the Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, the Museo de Arte Moderno de México, and the Hermitage in St. Petersburg among many others. In 2009, the Museum of Lain American Art in Long Beach, California, presented a survey exhibition of his work, entitled “Of Rage and Redemption: The Art of Oswaldo Guayasamin.”
<br>
<br>“Atahualpa en Cajamarcas” is a strong example of Guayasamin’s Cubist-styled portraits. Here, he depicts the Inca ruler who was captured by Spanish forces in Cajamarca, leading to the fall of the Inca Empire. Guayasamin's best-known works are marked by this expressive representation of struggle, tragedy, and humanity. Ecuadorian painter Oswaldo Guayasamin creates intense and captivating images that demand a response from the viewer. His long career has explored themes from the atrocities of World War II and the Spanish Civil War, to the plight of indigenous peoples of the Andes. His work has received awards at biennials in Mexico, São Paulo, and Barcelona, and has been exhibited worldwide at prestigious institutions such as the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Madrid, the Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, the Museo de Arte Moderno de México, and the Hermitage in St. Petersburg among many others. In 2009, the Museum of Lain American Art in Long Beach, California, presented a survey exhibition of his work, entitled “Of Rage and Redemption: The Art of Oswaldo Guayasamin.”
<br>
<br>“Atahualpa en Cajamarcas” is a strong example of Guayasamin’s Cubist-styled portraits. Here, he depicts the Inca ruler who was captured by Spanish forces in Cajamarca, leading to the fall of the Inca Empire. Guayasamin's best-known works are marked by this expressive representation of struggle, tragedy, and humanity. Ecuadorian painter Oswaldo Guayasamin creates intense and captivating images that demand a response from the viewer. His long career has explored themes from the atrocities of World War II and the Spanish Civil War, to the plight of indigenous peoples of the Andes. His work has received awards at biennials in Mexico, São Paulo, and Barcelona, and has been exhibited worldwide at prestigious institutions such as the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Madrid, the Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, the Museo de Arte Moderno de México, and the Hermitage in St. Petersburg among many others. In 2009, the Museum of Lain American Art in Long Beach, California, presented a survey exhibition of his work, entitled “Of Rage and Redemption: The Art of Oswaldo Guayasamin.”
<br>
<br>“Atahualpa en Cajamarcas” is a strong example of Guayasamin’s Cubist-styled portraits. Here, he depicts the Inca ruler who was captured by Spanish forces in Cajamarca, leading to the fall of the Inca Empire. Guayasamin's best-known works are marked by this expressive representation of struggle, tragedy, and humanity. Ecuadorian painter Oswaldo Guayasamin creates intense and captivating images that demand a response from the viewer. His long career has explored themes from the atrocities of World War II and the Spanish Civil War, to the plight of indigenous peoples of the Andes. His work has received awards at biennials in Mexico, São Paulo, and Barcelona, and has been exhibited worldwide at prestigious institutions such as the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Madrid, the Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, the Museo de Arte Moderno de México, and the Hermitage in St. Petersburg among many others. In 2009, the Museum of Lain American Art in Long Beach, California, presented a survey exhibition of his work, entitled “Of Rage and Redemption: The Art of Oswaldo Guayasamin.”
<br>
<br>“Atahualpa en Cajamarcas” is a strong example of Guayasamin’s Cubist-styled portraits. Here, he depicts the Inca ruler who was captured by Spanish forces in Cajamarca, leading to the fall of the Inca Empire. Guayasamin's best-known works are marked by this expressive representation of struggle, tragedy, and humanity. Ecuadorian painter Oswaldo Guayasamin creates intense and captivating images that demand a response from the viewer. His long career has explored themes from the atrocities of World War II and the Spanish Civil War, to the plight of indigenous peoples of the Andes. His work has received awards at biennials in Mexico, São Paulo, and Barcelona, and has been exhibited worldwide at prestigious institutions such as the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Madrid, the Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, the Museo de Arte Moderno de México, and the Hermitage in St. Petersburg among many others. In 2009, the Museum of Lain American Art in Long Beach, California, presented a survey exhibition of his work, entitled “Of Rage and Redemption: The Art of Oswaldo Guayasamin.”
<br>
<br>“Atahualpa en Cajamarcas” is a strong example of Guayasamin’s Cubist-styled portraits. Here, he depicts the Inca ruler who was captured by Spanish forces in Cajamarca, leading to the fall of the Inca Empire. Guayasamin's best-known works are marked by this expressive representation of struggle, tragedy, and humanity. Ecuadorian painter Oswaldo Guayasamin creates intense and captivating images that demand a response from the viewer. His long career has explored themes from the atrocities of World War II and the Spanish Civil War, to the plight of indigenous peoples of the Andes. His work has received awards at biennials in Mexico, São Paulo, and Barcelona, and has been exhibited worldwide at prestigious institutions such as the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Madrid, the Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, the Museo de Arte Moderno de México, and the Hermitage in St. Petersburg among many others. In 2009, the Museum of Lain American Art in Long Beach, California, presented a survey exhibition of his work, entitled “Of Rage and Redemption: The Art of Oswaldo Guayasamin.”
<br>
<br>“Atahualpa en Cajamarcas” is a strong example of Guayasamin’s Cubist-styled portraits. Here, he depicts the Inca ruler who was captured by Spanish forces in Cajamarca, leading to the fall of the Inca Empire. Guayasamin's best-known works are marked by this expressive representation of struggle, tragedy, and humanity. Ecuadorian painter Oswaldo Guayasamin creates intense and captivating images that demand a response from the viewer. His long career has explored themes from the atrocities of World War II and the Spanish Civil War, to the plight of indigenous peoples of the Andes. His work has received awards at biennials in Mexico, São Paulo, and Barcelona, and has been exhibited worldwide at prestigious institutions such as the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Madrid, the Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, the Museo de Arte Moderno de México, and the Hermitage in St. Petersburg among many others. In 2009, the Museum of Lain American Art in Long Beach, California, presented a survey exhibition of his work, entitled “Of Rage and Redemption: The Art of Oswaldo Guayasamin.”
<br>
<br>“Atahualpa en Cajamarcas” is a strong example of Guayasamin’s Cubist-styled portraits. Here, he depicts the Inca ruler who was captured by Spanish forces in Cajamarca, leading to the fall of the Inca Empire. Guayasamin's best-known works are marked by this expressive representation of struggle, tragedy, and humanity. Ecuadorian painter Oswaldo Guayasamin creates intense and captivating images that demand a response from the viewer. His long career has explored themes from the atrocities of World War II and the Spanish Civil War, to the plight of indigenous peoples of the Andes. His work has received awards at biennials in Mexico, São Paulo, and Barcelona, and has been exhibited worldwide at prestigious institutions such as the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Madrid, the Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, the Museo de Arte Moderno de México, and the Hermitage in St. Petersburg among many others. In 2009, the Museum of Lain American Art in Long Beach, California, presented a survey exhibition of his work, entitled “Of Rage and Redemption: The Art of Oswaldo Guayasamin.”
<br>
<br>“Atahualpa en Cajamarcas” is a strong example of Guayasamin’s Cubist-styled portraits. Here, he depicts the Inca ruler who was captured by Spanish forces in Cajamarca, leading to the fall of the Inca Empire. Guayasamin's best-known works are marked by this expressive representation of struggle, tragedy, and humanity. Ecuadorian painter Oswaldo Guayasamin creates intense and captivating images that demand a response from the viewer. His long career has explored themes from the atrocities of World War II and the Spanish Civil War, to the plight of indigenous peoples of the Andes. His work has received awards at biennials in Mexico, São Paulo, and Barcelona, and has been exhibited worldwide at prestigious institutions such as the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Madrid, the Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, the Museo de Arte Moderno de México, and the Hermitage in St. Petersburg among many others. In 2009, the Museum of Lain American Art in Long Beach, California, presented a survey exhibition of his work, entitled “Of Rage and Redemption: The Art of Oswaldo Guayasamin.”
<br>
<br>“Atahualpa en Cajamarcas” is a strong example of Guayasamin’s Cubist-styled portraits. Here, he depicts the Inca ruler who was captured by Spanish forces in Cajamarca, leading to the fall of the Inca Empire. Guayasamin's best-known works are marked by this expressive representation of struggle, tragedy, and humanity.
Atahualpa en Cajamarcas28 x 19 1/2 in.(71.12 x 49.53 cm) oil on canvas
Provenance
Butterfields Auctioneers, Los Angeles, October 24, 2001 [Lot 2016]
Private Collection, Beverly Hills, California
Heather James Fine Art, California

95,000

Ecuadorian painter Oswaldo Guayasamin creates intense and captivating images that demand a response from the viewer. His long career has explored themes from the atrocities of World War II and the Spanish Civil War, to the plight of indigenous peoples of the Andes. His work has received awards at biennials in Mexico, São Paulo, and Barcelona, and has been exhibited worldwide at prestigious institutions such as the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Madrid, the Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, the Museo de Arte Moderno de México, and the Hermitage in St. Petersburg among many others. In 2009, the Museum of Lain American Art in Long Beach, California, presented a survey exhibition of his work, entitled “Of Rage and Redemption: The Art of Oswaldo Guayasamin.”

“Atahualpa en Cajamarcas” is a strong example of Guayasamin’s Cubist-styled portraits. Here, he depicts the Inca ruler who was captured by Spanish forces in Cajamarca, leading to the fall of the Inca Empire. Guayasamin's best-known works are marked by this expressive representation of struggle, tragedy, and humanity.
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