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FERNANDO BOTERO (b. 1932)

 
Fernando Botero, best known for his voluptuously rotund human figures, was born in Medellín, Colombia on April 19, 1932. He held his first solo exhibition in 1951 in Bogota at the age of 19 and made enough money to travel to Spain where he studied at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando in Madrid. 
<br>
<br>While studying painting in Madrid in the early 1950s, Botero made his living by copying paintings housed in the Prado Museum—particularly those of his idols at the time, Francisco de Goya and Diego Velázquez—and selling them to tourists. 
<br> 
<br>In "Dibujo a la Manera de Velasquez" (1960), Botero appears to be riffing on Velázquez's "El bufón don Diego de Acedo," one of the renowned Spanish painter's portraits of jesters and "men of pleasure" painted to decorate the royal palaces. That painting has been in the Prado Museum in Madrid, Spain, since 1819. Fernando Botero, best known for his voluptuously rotund human figures, was born in Medellín, Colombia on April 19, 1932. He held his first solo exhibition in 1951 in Bogota at the age of 19 and made enough money to travel to Spain where he studied at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando in Madrid. 
<br>
<br>While studying painting in Madrid in the early 1950s, Botero made his living by copying paintings housed in the Prado Museum—particularly those of his idols at the time, Francisco de Goya and Diego Velázquez—and selling them to tourists. 
<br> 
<br>In "Dibujo a la Manera de Velasquez" (1960), Botero appears to be riffing on Velázquez's "El bufón don Diego de Acedo," one of the renowned Spanish painter's portraits of jesters and "men of pleasure" painted to decorate the royal palaces. That painting has been in the Prado Museum in Madrid, Spain, since 1819. Fernando Botero, best known for his voluptuously rotund human figures, was born in Medellín, Colombia on April 19, 1932. He held his first solo exhibition in 1951 in Bogota at the age of 19 and made enough money to travel to Spain where he studied at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando in Madrid. 
<br>
<br>While studying painting in Madrid in the early 1950s, Botero made his living by copying paintings housed in the Prado Museum—particularly those of his idols at the time, Francisco de Goya and Diego Velázquez—and selling them to tourists. 
<br> 
<br>In "Dibujo a la Manera de Velasquez" (1960), Botero appears to be riffing on Velázquez's "El bufón don Diego de Acedo," one of the renowned Spanish painter's portraits of jesters and "men of pleasure" painted to decorate the royal palaces. That painting has been in the Prado Museum in Madrid, Spain, since 1819. Fernando Botero, best known for his voluptuously rotund human figures, was born in Medellín, Colombia on April 19, 1932. He held his first solo exhibition in 1951 in Bogota at the age of 19 and made enough money to travel to Spain where he studied at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando in Madrid. 
<br>
<br>While studying painting in Madrid in the early 1950s, Botero made his living by copying paintings housed in the Prado Museum—particularly those of his idols at the time, Francisco de Goya and Diego Velázquez—and selling them to tourists. 
<br> 
<br>In "Dibujo a la Manera de Velasquez" (1960), Botero appears to be riffing on Velázquez's "El bufón don Diego de Acedo," one of the renowned Spanish painter's portraits of jesters and "men of pleasure" painted to decorate the royal palaces. That painting has been in the Prado Museum in Madrid, Spain, since 1819. Fernando Botero, best known for his voluptuously rotund human figures, was born in Medellín, Colombia on April 19, 1932. He held his first solo exhibition in 1951 in Bogota at the age of 19 and made enough money to travel to Spain where he studied at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando in Madrid. 
<br>
<br>While studying painting in Madrid in the early 1950s, Botero made his living by copying paintings housed in the Prado Museum—particularly those of his idols at the time, Francisco de Goya and Diego Velázquez—and selling them to tourists. 
<br> 
<br>In "Dibujo a la Manera de Velasquez" (1960), Botero appears to be riffing on Velázquez's "El bufón don Diego de Acedo," one of the renowned Spanish painter's portraits of jesters and "men of pleasure" painted to decorate the royal palaces. That painting has been in the Prado Museum in Madrid, Spain, since 1819. Fernando Botero, best known for his voluptuously rotund human figures, was born in Medellín, Colombia on April 19, 1932. He held his first solo exhibition in 1951 in Bogota at the age of 19 and made enough money to travel to Spain where he studied at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando in Madrid. 
<br>
<br>While studying painting in Madrid in the early 1950s, Botero made his living by copying paintings housed in the Prado Museum—particularly those of his idols at the time, Francisco de Goya and Diego Velázquez—and selling them to tourists. 
<br> 
<br>In "Dibujo a la Manera de Velasquez" (1960), Botero appears to be riffing on Velázquez's "El bufón don Diego de Acedo," one of the renowned Spanish painter's portraits of jesters and "men of pleasure" painted to decorate the royal palaces. That painting has been in the Prado Museum in Madrid, Spain, since 1819. Fernando Botero, best known for his voluptuously rotund human figures, was born in Medellín, Colombia on April 19, 1932. He held his first solo exhibition in 1951 in Bogota at the age of 19 and made enough money to travel to Spain where he studied at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando in Madrid. 
<br>
<br>While studying painting in Madrid in the early 1950s, Botero made his living by copying paintings housed in the Prado Museum—particularly those of his idols at the time, Francisco de Goya and Diego Velázquez—and selling them to tourists. 
<br> 
<br>In "Dibujo a la Manera de Velasquez" (1960), Botero appears to be riffing on Velázquez's "El bufón don Diego de Acedo," one of the renowned Spanish painter's portraits of jesters and "men of pleasure" painted to decorate the royal palaces. That painting has been in the Prado Museum in Madrid, Spain, since 1819. Fernando Botero, best known for his voluptuously rotund human figures, was born in Medellín, Colombia on April 19, 1932. He held his first solo exhibition in 1951 in Bogota at the age of 19 and made enough money to travel to Spain where he studied at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando in Madrid. 
<br>
<br>While studying painting in Madrid in the early 1950s, Botero made his living by copying paintings housed in the Prado Museum—particularly those of his idols at the time, Francisco de Goya and Diego Velázquez—and selling them to tourists. 
<br> 
<br>In "Dibujo a la Manera de Velasquez" (1960), Botero appears to be riffing on Velázquez's "El bufón don Diego de Acedo," one of the renowned Spanish painter's portraits of jesters and "men of pleasure" painted to decorate the royal palaces. That painting has been in the Prado Museum in Madrid, Spain, since 1819. Fernando Botero, best known for his voluptuously rotund human figures, was born in Medellín, Colombia on April 19, 1932. He held his first solo exhibition in 1951 in Bogota at the age of 19 and made enough money to travel to Spain where he studied at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando in Madrid. 
<br>
<br>While studying painting in Madrid in the early 1950s, Botero made his living by copying paintings housed in the Prado Museum—particularly those of his idols at the time, Francisco de Goya and Diego Velázquez—and selling them to tourists. 
<br> 
<br>In "Dibujo a la Manera de Velasquez" (1960), Botero appears to be riffing on Velázquez's "El bufón don Diego de Acedo," one of the renowned Spanish painter's portraits of jesters and "men of pleasure" painted to decorate the royal palaces. That painting has been in the Prado Museum in Madrid, Spain, since 1819. Fernando Botero, best known for his voluptuously rotund human figures, was born in Medellín, Colombia on April 19, 1932. He held his first solo exhibition in 1951 in Bogota at the age of 19 and made enough money to travel to Spain where he studied at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando in Madrid. 
<br>
<br>While studying painting in Madrid in the early 1950s, Botero made his living by copying paintings housed in the Prado Museum—particularly those of his idols at the time, Francisco de Goya and Diego Velázquez—and selling them to tourists. 
<br> 
<br>In "Dibujo a la Manera de Velasquez" (1960), Botero appears to be riffing on Velázquez's "El bufón don Diego de Acedo," one of the renowned Spanish painter's portraits of jesters and "men of pleasure" painted to decorate the royal palaces. That painting has been in the Prado Museum in Madrid, Spain, since 1819.
Dibujo a la Manera de Velasquez196060 1/2 x 47 1/2 in. charcoal and pastel on cardboard
Provenance
Private Collection, New York
Estudio Actual, Caracas, Venezuela
Private Collection, Bogota, Columbia
CDS Gallery, New York
Private Collection, New York
Fernando Botero, best known for his voluptuously rotund human figures, was born in Medellín, Colombia on April 19, 1932. He held his first solo exhibition in 1951 in Bogota at the age of 19 and made enough money to travel to Spain where he studied at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando in Madrid.

While studying painting in Madrid in the early 1950s, Botero made his living by copying paintings housed in the Prado Museum—particularly those of his idols at the time, Francisco de Goya and Diego Velázquez—and selling them to tourists.

In "Dibujo a la Manera de Velasquez" (1960), Botero appears to be riffing on Velázquez's "El bufón don Diego de Acedo," one of the renowned Spanish painter's portraits of jesters and "men of pleasure" painted to decorate the royal palaces. That painting has been in the Prado Museum in Madrid, Spain, since 1819.
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