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RICARDO MARTINEZ (1918-2009)

 
Born in Mexico City in 1918, Ricardo Martinez de Hoyos was the thirteenth of sixteen children. Among his siblings were other artists: Oliverio, a sculptor; Enrico and Homero, architects; and Jorge, who became a well-known actor. The first prestigious recognition of Martinez’s work as a painter came with the Raúl Beillers Prize in 1967, followed by the Moinho Santista Prize at the Sao Paulo Biennial in 1971. He went on to exhibit at important Mexican institutions such as the Museo de Arte Moderno and the Palacio de Bellas Artes, which held a major retrospective of Martinez’s work in 1994. After his death, the Museo de la Ciudad de México presented a Ricardo Martinez retrospective in 2012. 
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<br>“Mujer con Vasija” from 1976 exemplifies the artist’s distinctive style of figurative painting. The monumental figure fills the canvas, contoured by the dramatic contrast of light and color. Many of his paintings from this period center on volumetric figures in scenes of daily life, such as this woman with a vessel. This pieces shows vestiges of his earlier influences in the 1940s and ‘50s, stylized lines inspired by pre-Hispanic art combined with the unreal environments of surrealism. Born in Mexico City in 1918, Ricardo Martinez de Hoyos was the thirteenth of sixteen children. Among his siblings were other artists: Oliverio, a sculptor; Enrico and Homero, architects; and Jorge, who became a well-known actor. The first prestigious recognition of Martinez’s work as a painter came with the Raúl Beillers Prize in 1967, followed by the Moinho Santista Prize at the Sao Paulo Biennial in 1971. He went on to exhibit at important Mexican institutions such as the Museo de Arte Moderno and the Palacio de Bellas Artes, which held a major retrospective of Martinez’s work in 1994. After his death, the Museo de la Ciudad de México presented a Ricardo Martinez retrospective in 2012. 
<br>
<br>“Mujer con Vasija” from 1976 exemplifies the artist’s distinctive style of figurative painting. The monumental figure fills the canvas, contoured by the dramatic contrast of light and color. Many of his paintings from this period center on volumetric figures in scenes of daily life, such as this woman with a vessel. This pieces shows vestiges of his earlier influences in the 1940s and ‘50s, stylized lines inspired by pre-Hispanic art combined with the unreal environments of surrealism. Born in Mexico City in 1918, Ricardo Martinez de Hoyos was the thirteenth of sixteen children. Among his siblings were other artists: Oliverio, a sculptor; Enrico and Homero, architects; and Jorge, who became a well-known actor. The first prestigious recognition of Martinez’s work as a painter came with the Raúl Beillers Prize in 1967, followed by the Moinho Santista Prize at the Sao Paulo Biennial in 1971. He went on to exhibit at important Mexican institutions such as the Museo de Arte Moderno and the Palacio de Bellas Artes, which held a major retrospective of Martinez’s work in 1994. After his death, the Museo de la Ciudad de México presented a Ricardo Martinez retrospective in 2012. 
<br>
<br>“Mujer con Vasija” from 1976 exemplifies the artist’s distinctive style of figurative painting. The monumental figure fills the canvas, contoured by the dramatic contrast of light and color. Many of his paintings from this period center on volumetric figures in scenes of daily life, such as this woman with a vessel. This pieces shows vestiges of his earlier influences in the 1940s and ‘50s, stylized lines inspired by pre-Hispanic art combined with the unreal environments of surrealism. Born in Mexico City in 1918, Ricardo Martinez de Hoyos was the thirteenth of sixteen children. Among his siblings were other artists: Oliverio, a sculptor; Enrico and Homero, architects; and Jorge, who became a well-known actor. The first prestigious recognition of Martinez’s work as a painter came with the Raúl Beillers Prize in 1967, followed by the Moinho Santista Prize at the Sao Paulo Biennial in 1971. He went on to exhibit at important Mexican institutions such as the Museo de Arte Moderno and the Palacio de Bellas Artes, which held a major retrospective of Martinez’s work in 1994. After his death, the Museo de la Ciudad de México presented a Ricardo Martinez retrospective in 2012. 
<br>
<br>“Mujer con Vasija” from 1976 exemplifies the artist’s distinctive style of figurative painting. The monumental figure fills the canvas, contoured by the dramatic contrast of light and color. Many of his paintings from this period center on volumetric figures in scenes of daily life, such as this woman with a vessel. This pieces shows vestiges of his earlier influences in the 1940s and ‘50s, stylized lines inspired by pre-Hispanic art combined with the unreal environments of surrealism. Born in Mexico City in 1918, Ricardo Martinez de Hoyos was the thirteenth of sixteen children. Among his siblings were other artists: Oliverio, a sculptor; Enrico and Homero, architects; and Jorge, who became a well-known actor. The first prestigious recognition of Martinez’s work as a painter came with the Raúl Beillers Prize in 1967, followed by the Moinho Santista Prize at the Sao Paulo Biennial in 1971. He went on to exhibit at important Mexican institutions such as the Museo de Arte Moderno and the Palacio de Bellas Artes, which held a major retrospective of Martinez’s work in 1994. After his death, the Museo de la Ciudad de México presented a Ricardo Martinez retrospective in 2012. 
<br>
<br>“Mujer con Vasija” from 1976 exemplifies the artist’s distinctive style of figurative painting. The monumental figure fills the canvas, contoured by the dramatic contrast of light and color. Many of his paintings from this period center on volumetric figures in scenes of daily life, such as this woman with a vessel. This pieces shows vestiges of his earlier influences in the 1940s and ‘50s, stylized lines inspired by pre-Hispanic art combined with the unreal environments of surrealism. Born in Mexico City in 1918, Ricardo Martinez de Hoyos was the thirteenth of sixteen children. Among his siblings were other artists: Oliverio, a sculptor; Enrico and Homero, architects; and Jorge, who became a well-known actor. The first prestigious recognition of Martinez’s work as a painter came with the Raúl Beillers Prize in 1967, followed by the Moinho Santista Prize at the Sao Paulo Biennial in 1971. He went on to exhibit at important Mexican institutions such as the Museo de Arte Moderno and the Palacio de Bellas Artes, which held a major retrospective of Martinez’s work in 1994. After his death, the Museo de la Ciudad de México presented a Ricardo Martinez retrospective in 2012. 
<br>
<br>“Mujer con Vasija” from 1976 exemplifies the artist’s distinctive style of figurative painting. The monumental figure fills the canvas, contoured by the dramatic contrast of light and color. Many of his paintings from this period center on volumetric figures in scenes of daily life, such as this woman with a vessel. This pieces shows vestiges of his earlier influences in the 1940s and ‘50s, stylized lines inspired by pre-Hispanic art combined with the unreal environments of surrealism. Born in Mexico City in 1918, Ricardo Martinez de Hoyos was the thirteenth of sixteen children. Among his siblings were other artists: Oliverio, a sculptor; Enrico and Homero, architects; and Jorge, who became a well-known actor. The first prestigious recognition of Martinez’s work as a painter came with the Raúl Beillers Prize in 1967, followed by the Moinho Santista Prize at the Sao Paulo Biennial in 1971. He went on to exhibit at important Mexican institutions such as the Museo de Arte Moderno and the Palacio de Bellas Artes, which held a major retrospective of Martinez’s work in 1994. After his death, the Museo de la Ciudad de México presented a Ricardo Martinez retrospective in 2012. 
<br>
<br>“Mujer con Vasija” from 1976 exemplifies the artist’s distinctive style of figurative painting. The monumental figure fills the canvas, contoured by the dramatic contrast of light and color. Many of his paintings from this period center on volumetric figures in scenes of daily life, such as this woman with a vessel. This pieces shows vestiges of his earlier influences in the 1940s and ‘50s, stylized lines inspired by pre-Hispanic art combined with the unreal environments of surrealism. Born in Mexico City in 1918, Ricardo Martinez de Hoyos was the thirteenth of sixteen children. Among his siblings were other artists: Oliverio, a sculptor; Enrico and Homero, architects; and Jorge, who became a well-known actor. The first prestigious recognition of Martinez’s work as a painter came with the Raúl Beillers Prize in 1967, followed by the Moinho Santista Prize at the Sao Paulo Biennial in 1971. He went on to exhibit at important Mexican institutions such as the Museo de Arte Moderno and the Palacio de Bellas Artes, which held a major retrospective of Martinez’s work in 1994. After his death, the Museo de la Ciudad de México presented a Ricardo Martinez retrospective in 2012. 
<br>
<br>“Mujer con Vasija” from 1976 exemplifies the artist’s distinctive style of figurative painting. The monumental figure fills the canvas, contoured by the dramatic contrast of light and color. Many of his paintings from this period center on volumetric figures in scenes of daily life, such as this woman with a vessel. This pieces shows vestiges of his earlier influences in the 1940s and ‘50s, stylized lines inspired by pre-Hispanic art combined with the unreal environments of surrealism. Born in Mexico City in 1918, Ricardo Martinez de Hoyos was the thirteenth of sixteen children. Among his siblings were other artists: Oliverio, a sculptor; Enrico and Homero, architects; and Jorge, who became a well-known actor. The first prestigious recognition of Martinez’s work as a painter came with the Raúl Beillers Prize in 1967, followed by the Moinho Santista Prize at the Sao Paulo Biennial in 1971. He went on to exhibit at important Mexican institutions such as the Museo de Arte Moderno and the Palacio de Bellas Artes, which held a major retrospective of Martinez’s work in 1994. After his death, the Museo de la Ciudad de México presented a Ricardo Martinez retrospective in 2012. 
<br>
<br>“Mujer con Vasija” from 1976 exemplifies the artist’s distinctive style of figurative painting. The monumental figure fills the canvas, contoured by the dramatic contrast of light and color. Many of his paintings from this period center on volumetric figures in scenes of daily life, such as this woman with a vessel. This pieces shows vestiges of his earlier influences in the 1940s and ‘50s, stylized lines inspired by pre-Hispanic art combined with the unreal environments of surrealism. Born in Mexico City in 1918, Ricardo Martinez de Hoyos was the thirteenth of sixteen children. Among his siblings were other artists: Oliverio, a sculptor; Enrico and Homero, architects; and Jorge, who became a well-known actor. The first prestigious recognition of Martinez’s work as a painter came with the Raúl Beillers Prize in 1967, followed by the Moinho Santista Prize at the Sao Paulo Biennial in 1971. He went on to exhibit at important Mexican institutions such as the Museo de Arte Moderno and the Palacio de Bellas Artes, which held a major retrospective of Martinez’s work in 1994. After his death, the Museo de la Ciudad de México presented a Ricardo Martinez retrospective in 2012. 
<br>
<br>“Mujer con Vasija” from 1976 exemplifies the artist’s distinctive style of figurative painting. The monumental figure fills the canvas, contoured by the dramatic contrast of light and color. Many of his paintings from this period center on volumetric figures in scenes of daily life, such as this woman with a vessel. This pieces shows vestiges of his earlier influences in the 1940s and ‘50s, stylized lines inspired by pre-Hispanic art combined with the unreal environments of surrealism.
Mujer con Vasija197639 1/2 x 59 1/2 in(100.33 x 150.18 cm) oil on canvas
Provenance
The Collection of Paul and Gwenda Klein
Private Collection, California
Literature
Rubicon Gallery Catalogue, Los Altos, Ca., 1977.
 Unidentified author. “Ricardo Martínez”. Vanidades magazine, 18th April 1978, pp. 31–33.
 Cardoza y Aragón, Luis. Ricardo Martínez. México: Joaquín Mortiz, 1981 p. 86.
Price250,000
Born in Mexico City in 1918, Ricardo Martinez de Hoyos was the thirteenth of sixteen children. Among his siblings were other artists: Oliverio, a sculptor; Enrico and Homero, architects; and Jorge, who became a well-known actor. The first prestigious recognition of Martinez’s work as a painter came with the Raúl Beillers Prize in 1967, followed by the Moinho Santista Prize at the Sao Paulo Biennial in 1971. He went on to exhibit at important Mexican institutions such as the Museo de Arte Moderno and the Palacio de Bellas Artes, which held a major retrospective of Martinez’s work in 1994. After his death, the Museo de la Ciudad de México presented a Ricardo Martinez retrospective in 2012.

“Mujer con Vasija” from 1976 exemplifies the artist’s distinctive style of figurative painting. The monumental figure fills the canvas, contoured by the dramatic contrast of light and color. Many of his paintings from this period center on volumetric figures in scenes of daily life, such as this woman with a vessel. This pieces shows vestiges of his earlier influences in the 1940s and ‘50s, stylized lines inspired by pre-Hispanic art combined with the unreal environments of surrealism.
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