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FREDERICK FRIESEKE (1874-1939)

 
"Under the Striped Umbrella" is a mural painting by Frederick Carl Frieseke, an American Impressionist who spent most of his productive years as an expatriate in France. Department store magnate Rodman Wanamaker commissioned the 15-foot-long painting for the Hotel Shelburne in Atlantic City. Frieseke designed it as a single composition in 1905, and completed it in segments in 1906. Ultimately, the painting depicts elegant young ladies with bonnets, as well as several children playing in the sand and figures on horseback enjoying a day at the beach under striped parasols. 
<br>
<br>In 1906, Frieseke and his wife settled in the art colony in Giverny, where the great French Impressionist Claude Monet resided. Here, Frieseke found his aesthetic and asserted his familiar theme. The parasol also became a frequent motif — protecting his female models and reinforcing their position as articles of beauty and the recipient of the viewer’s gaze. 
<br>
<br>"Under the Striped Umbrella" was installed at the Hotel Shelburne in February 1906. In 2000 and 2001, it was exhibited at the Telfair Museum of Art in Savannah, Georgia, in the exhibition "Frederick Carl Frieseke; The Evolution of an American Impressionist."
<br>
<br>Frieseke exhibited extensively in the United States and in his adopted France. His work is in the permanent collections of the North Carolina Museum of Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Museum of Fine Arts-Boston. "Under the Striped Umbrella" is a mural painting by Frederick Carl Frieseke, an American Impressionist who spent most of his productive years as an expatriate in France. Department store magnate Rodman Wanamaker commissioned the 15-foot-long painting for the Hotel Shelburne in Atlantic City. Frieseke designed it as a single composition in 1905, and completed it in segments in 1906. Ultimately, the painting depicts elegant young ladies with bonnets, as well as several children playing in the sand and figures on horseback enjoying a day at the beach under striped parasols. 
<br>
<br>In 1906, Frieseke and his wife settled in the art colony in Giverny, where the great French Impressionist Claude Monet resided. Here, Frieseke found his aesthetic and asserted his familiar theme. The parasol also became a frequent motif — protecting his female models and reinforcing their position as articles of beauty and the recipient of the viewer’s gaze. 
<br>
<br>"Under the Striped Umbrella" was installed at the Hotel Shelburne in February 1906. In 2000 and 2001, it was exhibited at the Telfair Museum of Art in Savannah, Georgia, in the exhibition "Frederick Carl Frieseke; The Evolution of an American Impressionist."
<br>
<br>Frieseke exhibited extensively in the United States and in his adopted France. His work is in the permanent collections of the North Carolina Museum of Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Museum of Fine Arts-Boston. "Under the Striped Umbrella" is a mural painting by Frederick Carl Frieseke, an American Impressionist who spent most of his productive years as an expatriate in France. Department store magnate Rodman Wanamaker commissioned the 15-foot-long painting for the Hotel Shelburne in Atlantic City. Frieseke designed it as a single composition in 1905, and completed it in segments in 1906. Ultimately, the painting depicts elegant young ladies with bonnets, as well as several children playing in the sand and figures on horseback enjoying a day at the beach under striped parasols. 
<br>
<br>In 1906, Frieseke and his wife settled in the art colony in Giverny, where the great French Impressionist Claude Monet resided. Here, Frieseke found his aesthetic and asserted his familiar theme. The parasol also became a frequent motif — protecting his female models and reinforcing their position as articles of beauty and the recipient of the viewer’s gaze. 
<br>
<br>"Under the Striped Umbrella" was installed at the Hotel Shelburne in February 1906. In 2000 and 2001, it was exhibited at the Telfair Museum of Art in Savannah, Georgia, in the exhibition "Frederick Carl Frieseke; The Evolution of an American Impressionist."
<br>
<br>Frieseke exhibited extensively in the United States and in his adopted France. His work is in the permanent collections of the North Carolina Museum of Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Museum of Fine Arts-Boston. "Under the Striped Umbrella" is a mural painting by Frederick Carl Frieseke, an American Impressionist who spent most of his productive years as an expatriate in France. Department store magnate Rodman Wanamaker commissioned the 15-foot-long painting for the Hotel Shelburne in Atlantic City. Frieseke designed it as a single composition in 1905, and completed it in segments in 1906. Ultimately, the painting depicts elegant young ladies with bonnets, as well as several children playing in the sand and figures on horseback enjoying a day at the beach under striped parasols. 
<br>
<br>In 1906, Frieseke and his wife settled in the art colony in Giverny, where the great French Impressionist Claude Monet resided. Here, Frieseke found his aesthetic and asserted his familiar theme. The parasol also became a frequent motif — protecting his female models and reinforcing their position as articles of beauty and the recipient of the viewer’s gaze. 
<br>
<br>"Under the Striped Umbrella" was installed at the Hotel Shelburne in February 1906. In 2000 and 2001, it was exhibited at the Telfair Museum of Art in Savannah, Georgia, in the exhibition "Frederick Carl Frieseke; The Evolution of an American Impressionist."
<br>
<br>Frieseke exhibited extensively in the United States and in his adopted France. His work is in the permanent collections of the North Carolina Museum of Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Museum of Fine Arts-Boston. "Under the Striped Umbrella" is a mural painting by Frederick Carl Frieseke, an American Impressionist who spent most of his productive years as an expatriate in France. Department store magnate Rodman Wanamaker commissioned the 15-foot-long painting for the Hotel Shelburne in Atlantic City. Frieseke designed it as a single composition in 1905, and completed it in segments in 1906. Ultimately, the painting depicts elegant young ladies with bonnets, as well as several children playing in the sand and figures on horseback enjoying a day at the beach under striped parasols. 
<br>
<br>In 1906, Frieseke and his wife settled in the art colony in Giverny, where the great French Impressionist Claude Monet resided. Here, Frieseke found his aesthetic and asserted his familiar theme. The parasol also became a frequent motif — protecting his female models and reinforcing their position as articles of beauty and the recipient of the viewer’s gaze. 
<br>
<br>"Under the Striped Umbrella" was installed at the Hotel Shelburne in February 1906. In 2000 and 2001, it was exhibited at the Telfair Museum of Art in Savannah, Georgia, in the exhibition "Frederick Carl Frieseke; The Evolution of an American Impressionist."
<br>
<br>Frieseke exhibited extensively in the United States and in his adopted France. His work is in the permanent collections of the North Carolina Museum of Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Museum of Fine Arts-Boston. "Under the Striped Umbrella" is a mural painting by Frederick Carl Frieseke, an American Impressionist who spent most of his productive years as an expatriate in France. Department store magnate Rodman Wanamaker commissioned the 15-foot-long painting for the Hotel Shelburne in Atlantic City. Frieseke designed it as a single composition in 1905, and completed it in segments in 1906. Ultimately, the painting depicts elegant young ladies with bonnets, as well as several children playing in the sand and figures on horseback enjoying a day at the beach under striped parasols. 
<br>
<br>In 1906, Frieseke and his wife settled in the art colony in Giverny, where the great French Impressionist Claude Monet resided. Here, Frieseke found his aesthetic and asserted his familiar theme. The parasol also became a frequent motif — protecting his female models and reinforcing their position as articles of beauty and the recipient of the viewer’s gaze. 
<br>
<br>"Under the Striped Umbrella" was installed at the Hotel Shelburne in February 1906. In 2000 and 2001, it was exhibited at the Telfair Museum of Art in Savannah, Georgia, in the exhibition "Frederick Carl Frieseke; The Evolution of an American Impressionist."
<br>
<br>Frieseke exhibited extensively in the United States and in his adopted France. His work is in the permanent collections of the North Carolina Museum of Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Museum of Fine Arts-Boston. "Under the Striped Umbrella" is a mural painting by Frederick Carl Frieseke, an American Impressionist who spent most of his productive years as an expatriate in France. Department store magnate Rodman Wanamaker commissioned the 15-foot-long painting for the Hotel Shelburne in Atlantic City. Frieseke designed it as a single composition in 1905, and completed it in segments in 1906. Ultimately, the painting depicts elegant young ladies with bonnets, as well as several children playing in the sand and figures on horseback enjoying a day at the beach under striped parasols. 
<br>
<br>In 1906, Frieseke and his wife settled in the art colony in Giverny, where the great French Impressionist Claude Monet resided. Here, Frieseke found his aesthetic and asserted his familiar theme. The parasol also became a frequent motif — protecting his female models and reinforcing their position as articles of beauty and the recipient of the viewer’s gaze. 
<br>
<br>"Under the Striped Umbrella" was installed at the Hotel Shelburne in February 1906. In 2000 and 2001, it was exhibited at the Telfair Museum of Art in Savannah, Georgia, in the exhibition "Frederick Carl Frieseke; The Evolution of an American Impressionist."
<br>
<br>Frieseke exhibited extensively in the United States and in his adopted France. His work is in the permanent collections of the North Carolina Museum of Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Museum of Fine Arts-Boston. "Under the Striped Umbrella" is a mural painting by Frederick Carl Frieseke, an American Impressionist who spent most of his productive years as an expatriate in France. Department store magnate Rodman Wanamaker commissioned the 15-foot-long painting for the Hotel Shelburne in Atlantic City. Frieseke designed it as a single composition in 1905, and completed it in segments in 1906. Ultimately, the painting depicts elegant young ladies with bonnets, as well as several children playing in the sand and figures on horseback enjoying a day at the beach under striped parasols. 
<br>
<br>In 1906, Frieseke and his wife settled in the art colony in Giverny, where the great French Impressionist Claude Monet resided. Here, Frieseke found his aesthetic and asserted his familiar theme. The parasol also became a frequent motif — protecting his female models and reinforcing their position as articles of beauty and the recipient of the viewer’s gaze. 
<br>
<br>"Under the Striped Umbrella" was installed at the Hotel Shelburne in February 1906. In 2000 and 2001, it was exhibited at the Telfair Museum of Art in Savannah, Georgia, in the exhibition "Frederick Carl Frieseke; The Evolution of an American Impressionist."
<br>
<br>Frieseke exhibited extensively in the United States and in his adopted France. His work is in the permanent collections of the North Carolina Museum of Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Museum of Fine Arts-Boston. "Under the Striped Umbrella" is a mural painting by Frederick Carl Frieseke, an American Impressionist who spent most of his productive years as an expatriate in France. Department store magnate Rodman Wanamaker commissioned the 15-foot-long painting for the Hotel Shelburne in Atlantic City. Frieseke designed it as a single composition in 1905, and completed it in segments in 1906. Ultimately, the painting depicts elegant young ladies with bonnets, as well as several children playing in the sand and figures on horseback enjoying a day at the beach under striped parasols. 
<br>
<br>In 1906, Frieseke and his wife settled in the art colony in Giverny, where the great French Impressionist Claude Monet resided. Here, Frieseke found his aesthetic and asserted his familiar theme. The parasol also became a frequent motif — protecting his female models and reinforcing their position as articles of beauty and the recipient of the viewer’s gaze. 
<br>
<br>"Under the Striped Umbrella" was installed at the Hotel Shelburne in February 1906. In 2000 and 2001, it was exhibited at the Telfair Museum of Art in Savannah, Georgia, in the exhibition "Frederick Carl Frieseke; The Evolution of an American Impressionist."
<br>
<br>Frieseke exhibited extensively in the United States and in his adopted France. His work is in the permanent collections of the North Carolina Museum of Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Museum of Fine Arts-Boston. "Under the Striped Umbrella" is a mural painting by Frederick Carl Frieseke, an American Impressionist who spent most of his productive years as an expatriate in France. Department store magnate Rodman Wanamaker commissioned the 15-foot-long painting for the Hotel Shelburne in Atlantic City. Frieseke designed it as a single composition in 1905, and completed it in segments in 1906. Ultimately, the painting depicts elegant young ladies with bonnets, as well as several children playing in the sand and figures on horseback enjoying a day at the beach under striped parasols. 
<br>
<br>In 1906, Frieseke and his wife settled in the art colony in Giverny, where the great French Impressionist Claude Monet resided. Here, Frieseke found his aesthetic and asserted his familiar theme. The parasol also became a frequent motif — protecting his female models and reinforcing their position as articles of beauty and the recipient of the viewer’s gaze. 
<br>
<br>"Under the Striped Umbrella" was installed at the Hotel Shelburne in February 1906. In 2000 and 2001, it was exhibited at the Telfair Museum of Art in Savannah, Georgia, in the exhibition "Frederick Carl Frieseke; The Evolution of an American Impressionist."
<br>
<br>Frieseke exhibited extensively in the United States and in his adopted France. His work is in the permanent collections of the North Carolina Museum of Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Museum of Fine Arts-Boston.
Under the Striped Umbrella1905/06 France60 1/2 x 190 1/2 in.(153.67 x 483.87 cm) oil on canvas
Provenance
David David Gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Private Collection, California
Exhibition
Telfair Museum Of Art, Savannah, Georgia, Frederick Carl Frieseke; The Evolution Of An American Impressionist, 2000/2001; travelling to Dixon Gallery & Gardens, Memphis, Tennessee, 2001; San Diego Museum Of Art, San Diego, California, 2001; Terra Museum Of Art, Chicago, Illinois, 2001
Literature
N. Kilmer, Frederick Carl Frieseke; The Evolution Of An American Impressionist, Princeton University Press, 2000, reproduced p. 139
International Studio An Illustrated Magazin
...More...e Of Fine And Applied Art, Volume Forty-Three, Comprising March, April, May & June 1911; numbers 169 to 172; ”American Artists In Paris” pages 263-270
L’Art Decoratif, Revue Mensuelle D’Art Contemporain, 8me Annee, 2 Semestre, Juillet 1906-December 1906; “La Decoration D’un Hotel Americain” page 195-200
...LESS...
"Under the Striped Umbrella" is a mural painting by Frederick Carl Frieseke, an American Impressionist who spent most of his productive years as an expatriate in France. Department store magnate Rodman Wanamaker commissioned the 15-foot-long painting for the Hotel Shelburne in Atlantic City. Frieseke designed it as a single composition in 1905, and completed it in segments in 1906. Ultimately, the painting depicts elegant young ladies with bonnets, as well as several children playing in the sand and figures on horseback enjoying a day at the beach under striped parasols.

In 1906, Frieseke and his wife settled in the art colony in Giverny, where the great French Impressionist Claude Monet resided. Here, Frieseke found his aesthetic and asserted his familiar theme. The parasol also became a frequent motif — protecting his female models and reinforcing their position as articles of beauty and the recipient of the viewer’s gaze.

"Under the Striped Umbrella" was installed at the Hotel Shelburne in February 1906. In 2000 and 2001, it was exhibited at the Telfair Museum of Art in Savannah, Georgia, in the exhibition "Frederick Carl Frieseke; The Evolution of an American Impressionist."

Frieseke exhibited extensively in the United States and in his adopted France. His work is in the permanent collections of the North Carolina Museum of Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Museum of Fine Arts-Boston.
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“It is sunshine…which I have been principally interested in. If I could only reproduce it exactly as I see it, I would be satisfied.” – Frederick Frieseke

History

Frederick Frieseke is often regarded as the finest American Impressionist painter of the figure. Yet when he came to study at Académie Juilian in 1898, several les Nabis painters remained a lingering presence, and it was the rich, decorative patterns of Edouard Vuillard and Pierre Bonnard that served as the blueprint for his early success. That influence is clearly demonstrated in the unrestrained repetition of the voluminous, pleated, striped umbrellas of Under the Striped Umbrella, a canvas mural installed in the opulent Hotel Shelburne dining room overlooking the Atlantic City Boardwalk. The unifying impact of that repetitive element imbues the setting with cloud-like loft within a color scheme, evoking Vuillard and the richness of a Gobelin tapestry, rather than the effect of sunlight and broken color that mark his more familiar paintings from the decade of 1910 to 1920.

Under the Striped Umbrella was installed under the artist’s direction in February 1906. It remained on view for decades at the swanky hotel that enticed “Diamond Jim” James Buchanan Brady to pay one thousand dollars a week for permanent residence and was an unfading memory for throngs of well-heeled socialites, financiers, and notables from Irving Berlin to John Philip Sousa and Ethel Barrymore to Al Jolson. Undoubtedly, its presence high on the grand dining room wall contributed to the artist’s popularity and renown.

Today, we may look upon this long, frieze-like composition as a delightful fin-de-siécle costume study or an informative expose of Victorian mores as suggested by the separate spheres of gender groupings. But mostly, Under the Striped Umbrella recounts the artist’s unbridled delight and appreciation of women, here, expressed within familial, maternal, and social contexts. It is the subject and theme that brought Frieseke acclaim and awards on both sides of the Atlantic and which, to this day, endears him to the many who count him among the most beloved of American figurative painters. 

 

  • Frederick Carl Frieseke

    Peter A. Juley & Son Collection, Smithsonian American Art Museum
  • Edouard Vuillard, "A Game of Shuttlecock", circa 1905

    Edouard Vuillard, "A Game of Shuttlecock", circa 1905

  • Edouard Vuillard, "Woman in a Striped Dress", 1895

    National Gallery of Art, Washington, D. C.
  • Frederick Frieseke "Luxembourg Gardens, Paris", 1902

    Frederick Frieseke "Luxembourg Gardens, Paris", 1902

  • Frederick Frieseke, "Le Théau Jardin", 1904

    Frederick Frieseke, "Le Théau Jardin", 1904

  • Hotel Shelburne, Atlantic City, New Jersey, circa 1905

    Hotel Shelburne, Atlantic City, New Jersey, circa 1905

  • Hotel Shelburne, Atlantic City, NJ, circa 1910

    Hotel Shelburne, Atlantic City, NJ, circa 1910

Paintings in Museum Collections

The North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh

“The Garden Parasol” (c. 1910), oil on canvas, 57 1/8 x 77 in.

Los Angeles County Museum of Art

“Repose at Noonday” (c. 1911), oil on canvas, 26x 32 in.

El Museuo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid

“Hollyhocks” (c.1912-1913), oil on canvas, 31 3/4 x 31 3/4 in.

The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

“Sunbath” (c. 1913), oil on canvas, 28 7/8 x 36 1/2in.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

“Summer” (1914), oil on canvas, 45 3/16 x 57 3/4 in.

The Huntington, San Marino, California

“Woman Seated in a Garden” (1914), oil on canvas, 26 x 32 in.

The National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

“Memories” (1915), oil on canvas, 51 3/4 x 51 5/16 in.

The Art Institute of Chicago

“On the Bank” (c. 1915), oil on canvas, 40 1/2 × 57 1/2 in.

Image Gallery

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Other Works by Frederick Frieseke

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