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GEORGE CONDO (b. 1957)

 
Contemporary American artist George Condo coined the term “artificial realism” to characterize the figures that appear in his work – often described as a combination of European Old Master painting and American Pop art. Condo has defined the term as the “realistic representation of that which is artificial.” Known for figures that are often grotesque or fractured, Condo creates art that is both Contemporary and rooted in art historical tradition, drawing inspiration from Cubism or, in this case, reaching back to ancient Greece. In an uncommon work of sculpture, Condo imparts his distinctive style to the face of a Mycenaean archetype, the goddess figure. Contemporary American artist George Condo coined the term “artificial realism” to characterize the figures that appear in his work – often described as a combination of European Old Master painting and American Pop art. Condo has defined the term as the “realistic representation of that which is artificial.” Known for figures that are often grotesque or fractured, Condo creates art that is both Contemporary and rooted in art historical tradition, drawing inspiration from Cubism or, in this case, reaching back to ancient Greece. In an uncommon work of sculpture, Condo imparts his distinctive style to the face of a Mycenaean archetype, the goddess figure. Contemporary American artist George Condo coined the term “artificial realism” to characterize the figures that appear in his work – often described as a combination of European Old Master painting and American Pop art. Condo has defined the term as the “realistic representation of that which is artificial.” Known for figures that are often grotesque or fractured, Condo creates art that is both Contemporary and rooted in art historical tradition, drawing inspiration from Cubism or, in this case, reaching back to ancient Greece. In an uncommon work of sculpture, Condo imparts his distinctive style to the face of a Mycenaean archetype, the goddess figure. Contemporary American artist George Condo coined the term “artificial realism” to characterize the figures that appear in his work – often described as a combination of European Old Master painting and American Pop art. Condo has defined the term as the “realistic representation of that which is artificial.” Known for figures that are often grotesque or fractured, Condo creates art that is both Contemporary and rooted in art historical tradition, drawing inspiration from Cubism or, in this case, reaching back to ancient Greece. In an uncommon work of sculpture, Condo imparts his distinctive style to the face of a Mycenaean archetype, the goddess figure. Contemporary American artist George Condo coined the term “artificial realism” to characterize the figures that appear in his work – often described as a combination of European Old Master painting and American Pop art. Condo has defined the term as the “realistic representation of that which is artificial.” Known for figures that are often grotesque or fractured, Condo creates art that is both Contemporary and rooted in art historical tradition, drawing inspiration from Cubism or, in this case, reaching back to ancient Greece. In an uncommon work of sculpture, Condo imparts his distinctive style to the face of a Mycenaean archetype, the goddess figure. Contemporary American artist George Condo coined the term “artificial realism” to characterize the figures that appear in his work – often described as a combination of European Old Master painting and American Pop art. Condo has defined the term as the “realistic representation of that which is artificial.” Known for figures that are often grotesque or fractured, Condo creates art that is both Contemporary and rooted in art historical tradition, drawing inspiration from Cubism or, in this case, reaching back to ancient Greece. In an uncommon work of sculpture, Condo imparts his distinctive style to the face of a Mycenaean archetype, the goddess figure. Contemporary American artist George Condo coined the term “artificial realism” to characterize the figures that appear in his work – often described as a combination of European Old Master painting and American Pop art. Condo has defined the term as the “realistic representation of that which is artificial.” Known for figures that are often grotesque or fractured, Condo creates art that is both Contemporary and rooted in art historical tradition, drawing inspiration from Cubism or, in this case, reaching back to ancient Greece. In an uncommon work of sculpture, Condo imparts his distinctive style to the face of a Mycenaean archetype, the goddess figure. Contemporary American artist George Condo coined the term “artificial realism” to characterize the figures that appear in his work – often described as a combination of European Old Master painting and American Pop art. Condo has defined the term as the “realistic representation of that which is artificial.” Known for figures that are often grotesque or fractured, Condo creates art that is both Contemporary and rooted in art historical tradition, drawing inspiration from Cubism or, in this case, reaching back to ancient Greece. In an uncommon work of sculpture, Condo imparts his distinctive style to the face of a Mycenaean archetype, the goddess figure. Contemporary American artist George Condo coined the term “artificial realism” to characterize the figures that appear in his work – often described as a combination of European Old Master painting and American Pop art. Condo has defined the term as the “realistic representation of that which is artificial.” Known for figures that are often grotesque or fractured, Condo creates art that is both Contemporary and rooted in art historical tradition, drawing inspiration from Cubism or, in this case, reaching back to ancient Greece. In an uncommon work of sculpture, Condo imparts his distinctive style to the face of a Mycenaean archetype, the goddess figure. Contemporary American artist George Condo coined the term “artificial realism” to characterize the figures that appear in his work – often described as a combination of European Old Master painting and American Pop art. Condo has defined the term as the “realistic representation of that which is artificial.” Known for figures that are often grotesque or fractured, Condo creates art that is both Contemporary and rooted in art historical tradition, drawing inspiration from Cubism or, in this case, reaching back to ancient Greece. In an uncommon work of sculpture, Condo imparts his distinctive style to the face of a Mycenaean archetype, the goddess figure.
Mycenaean Goddess199061 x 22 x 15 1/2 in. bronze
Provenance
Private Collection, acquired directly from the artist
Christie's, "First Open Hybrid", Sale No. 13615, Lot 247, 14 July, 2016
Private Collection, Puerto Rico

160,000

Contemporary American artist George Condo coined the term “artificial realism” to characterize the figures that appear in his work – often described as a combination of European Old Master painting and American Pop art. Condo has defined the term as the “realistic representation of that which is artificial.” Known for figures that are often grotesque or fractured, Condo creates art that is both Contemporary and rooted in art historical tradition, drawing inspiration from Cubism or, in this case, reaching back to ancient Greece. In an uncommon work of sculpture, Condo imparts his distinctive style to the face of a Mycenaean archetype, the goddess figure.
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