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FREDERICK FRIESEKE (1874-1939)

 
Afternoon at the Beach depicts elegant young ladies with bonnets, as well as several children — two of which appear on a donkey — and an occasional male enjoying a day at the beach under striped parasols.  Female figures, flowers, and domestic interiors and exteriors were recurring elements in his paintings. Their fairly close tonalities reflect the deep influence that James Abbott McNeill Whistler had on Frieseke’s style. Here, Frieseke found his aesthetic and asserted his familiar theme.
<br>
<br>Department store magnate Rodman Wanamaker commissioned the 15-foot-long painting for the Hotel Shelburne in Atlantic City. Frieseke designed it as a single composition in 1905, and completed it in segments in 1906. The painting was installed at the Hotel Shelburne in February 1906. 
<br>
<br>In 2000 and 2001, Afternoon at the Beach was exhibited at the Telfair Museum of Art in Savannah, Georgia, during the 2000-2001 exhibition Frederick Carl Frieseke: The Evolution of an American Impressionist. Afternoon at the Beach depicts elegant young ladies with bonnets, as well as several children — two of which appear on a donkey — and an occasional male enjoying a day at the beach under striped parasols.  Female figures, flowers, and domestic interiors and exteriors were recurring elements in his paintings. Their fairly close tonalities reflect the deep influence that James Abbott McNeill Whistler had on Frieseke’s style. Here, Frieseke found his aesthetic and asserted his familiar theme.
<br>
<br>Department store magnate Rodman Wanamaker commissioned the 15-foot-long painting for the Hotel Shelburne in Atlantic City. Frieseke designed it as a single composition in 1905, and completed it in segments in 1906. The painting was installed at the Hotel Shelburne in February 1906. 
<br>
<br>In 2000 and 2001, Afternoon at the Beach was exhibited at the Telfair Museum of Art in Savannah, Georgia, during the 2000-2001 exhibition Frederick Carl Frieseke: The Evolution of an American Impressionist. Afternoon at the Beach depicts elegant young ladies with bonnets, as well as several children — two of which appear on a donkey — and an occasional male enjoying a day at the beach under striped parasols.  Female figures, flowers, and domestic interiors and exteriors were recurring elements in his paintings. Their fairly close tonalities reflect the deep influence that James Abbott McNeill Whistler had on Frieseke’s style. Here, Frieseke found his aesthetic and asserted his familiar theme.
<br>
<br>Department store magnate Rodman Wanamaker commissioned the 15-foot-long painting for the Hotel Shelburne in Atlantic City. Frieseke designed it as a single composition in 1905, and completed it in segments in 1906. The painting was installed at the Hotel Shelburne in February 1906. 
<br>
<br>In 2000 and 2001, Afternoon at the Beach was exhibited at the Telfair Museum of Art in Savannah, Georgia, during the 2000-2001 exhibition Frederick Carl Frieseke: The Evolution of an American Impressionist. Afternoon at the Beach depicts elegant young ladies with bonnets, as well as several children — two of which appear on a donkey — and an occasional male enjoying a day at the beach under striped parasols.  Female figures, flowers, and domestic interiors and exteriors were recurring elements in his paintings. Their fairly close tonalities reflect the deep influence that James Abbott McNeill Whistler had on Frieseke’s style. Here, Frieseke found his aesthetic and asserted his familiar theme.
<br>
<br>Department store magnate Rodman Wanamaker commissioned the 15-foot-long painting for the Hotel Shelburne in Atlantic City. Frieseke designed it as a single composition in 1905, and completed it in segments in 1906. The painting was installed at the Hotel Shelburne in February 1906. 
<br>
<br>In 2000 and 2001, Afternoon at the Beach was exhibited at the Telfair Museum of Art in Savannah, Georgia, during the 2000-2001 exhibition Frederick Carl Frieseke: The Evolution of an American Impressionist. Afternoon at the Beach depicts elegant young ladies with bonnets, as well as several children — two of which appear on a donkey — and an occasional male enjoying a day at the beach under striped parasols.  Female figures, flowers, and domestic interiors and exteriors were recurring elements in his paintings. Their fairly close tonalities reflect the deep influence that James Abbott McNeill Whistler had on Frieseke’s style. Here, Frieseke found his aesthetic and asserted his familiar theme.
<br>
<br>Department store magnate Rodman Wanamaker commissioned the 15-foot-long painting for the Hotel Shelburne in Atlantic City. Frieseke designed it as a single composition in 1905, and completed it in segments in 1906. The painting was installed at the Hotel Shelburne in February 1906. 
<br>
<br>In 2000 and 2001, Afternoon at the Beach was exhibited at the Telfair Museum of Art in Savannah, Georgia, during the 2000-2001 exhibition Frederick Carl Frieseke: The Evolution of an American Impressionist. Afternoon at the Beach depicts elegant young ladies with bonnets, as well as several children — two of which appear on a donkey — and an occasional male enjoying a day at the beach under striped parasols.  Female figures, flowers, and domestic interiors and exteriors were recurring elements in his paintings. Their fairly close tonalities reflect the deep influence that James Abbott McNeill Whistler had on Frieseke’s style. Here, Frieseke found his aesthetic and asserted his familiar theme.
<br>
<br>Department store magnate Rodman Wanamaker commissioned the 15-foot-long painting for the Hotel Shelburne in Atlantic City. Frieseke designed it as a single composition in 1905, and completed it in segments in 1906. The painting was installed at the Hotel Shelburne in February 1906. 
<br>
<br>In 2000 and 2001, Afternoon at the Beach was exhibited at the Telfair Museum of Art in Savannah, Georgia, during the 2000-2001 exhibition Frederick Carl Frieseke: The Evolution of an American Impressionist. Afternoon at the Beach depicts elegant young ladies with bonnets, as well as several children — two of which appear on a donkey — and an occasional male enjoying a day at the beach under striped parasols.  Female figures, flowers, and domestic interiors and exteriors were recurring elements in his paintings. Their fairly close tonalities reflect the deep influence that James Abbott McNeill Whistler had on Frieseke’s style. Here, Frieseke found his aesthetic and asserted his familiar theme.
<br>
<br>Department store magnate Rodman Wanamaker commissioned the 15-foot-long painting for the Hotel Shelburne in Atlantic City. Frieseke designed it as a single composition in 1905, and completed it in segments in 1906. The painting was installed at the Hotel Shelburne in February 1906. 
<br>
<br>In 2000 and 2001, Afternoon at the Beach was exhibited at the Telfair Museum of Art in Savannah, Georgia, during the 2000-2001 exhibition Frederick Carl Frieseke: The Evolution of an American Impressionist. Afternoon at the Beach depicts elegant young ladies with bonnets, as well as several children — two of which appear on a donkey — and an occasional male enjoying a day at the beach under striped parasols.  Female figures, flowers, and domestic interiors and exteriors were recurring elements in his paintings. Their fairly close tonalities reflect the deep influence that James Abbott McNeill Whistler had on Frieseke’s style. Here, Frieseke found his aesthetic and asserted his familiar theme.
<br>
<br>Department store magnate Rodman Wanamaker commissioned the 15-foot-long painting for the Hotel Shelburne in Atlantic City. Frieseke designed it as a single composition in 1905, and completed it in segments in 1906. The painting was installed at the Hotel Shelburne in February 1906. 
<br>
<br>In 2000 and 2001, Afternoon at the Beach was exhibited at the Telfair Museum of Art in Savannah, Georgia, during the 2000-2001 exhibition Frederick Carl Frieseke: The Evolution of an American Impressionist. Afternoon at the Beach depicts elegant young ladies with bonnets, as well as several children — two of which appear on a donkey — and an occasional male enjoying a day at the beach under striped parasols.  Female figures, flowers, and domestic interiors and exteriors were recurring elements in his paintings. Their fairly close tonalities reflect the deep influence that James Abbott McNeill Whistler had on Frieseke’s style. Here, Frieseke found his aesthetic and asserted his familiar theme.
<br>
<br>Department store magnate Rodman Wanamaker commissioned the 15-foot-long painting for the Hotel Shelburne in Atlantic City. Frieseke designed it as a single composition in 1905, and completed it in segments in 1906. The painting was installed at the Hotel Shelburne in February 1906. 
<br>
<br>In 2000 and 2001, Afternoon at the Beach was exhibited at the Telfair Museum of Art in Savannah, Georgia, during the 2000-2001 exhibition Frederick Carl Frieseke: The Evolution of an American Impressionist.
Afternoon at the Beach1905 / 1906 in Fra60 x 178 in.(152.4 x 452.12 cm) oil on canvas
Provenance
Commissioned by Rodman Wanamaker for the Hotel Shelburne in Atlantic City David David Gallery, Philadelphia
Private Collection, California
Heather James Fine Art
Exhibition
Telfair Museum Of Art, Savannah, Georgia, Frederick Carl Frieseke; The Evolution Of An American Impressionist, 2000/2001; travelling to Dixon Gallery & Gardens, Memphis, Tennessee, 2001; San Diego Museum Of Art, San Diego, California, 2001; Terra Museum Of Art, Chicago, Illinois, 2001
Literature
N. Kilmer, Frederick Carl Frieseke; The Evolution Of An American Impressionist, Princeton U...More...niversity Press, 2000, reproduced p. 139. International Studio An Illustrated Magazine Of Fine And Applied Art, Volume Forty-Three, Comprising March, April, May & June 1911; numbers 169 to 172; ”American Artists In Paris” pages 263-270. L’Art Decoratif, Revue Mensuelle D’Art Contemporain, 8me Annee, 2 Semestre, Juillet 1906-December 1906; “La Decoration D’un Hotel Americain” page 195-200...LESS...
Afternoon at the Beach depicts elegant young ladies with bonnets, as well as several children — two of which appear on a donkey — and an occasional male enjoying a day at the beach under striped parasols. Female figures, flowers, and domestic interiors and exteriors were recurring elements in his paintings. Their fairly close tonalities reflect the deep influence that James Abbott McNeill Whistler had on Frieseke’s style. Here, Frieseke found his aesthetic and asserted his familiar theme.

Department store magnate Rodman Wanamaker commissioned the 15-foot-long painting for the Hotel Shelburne in Atlantic City. Frieseke designed it as a single composition in 1905, and completed it in segments in 1906. The painting was installed at the Hotel Shelburne in February 1906.

In 2000 and 2001, Afternoon at the Beach was exhibited at the Telfair Museum of Art in Savannah, Georgia, during the 2000-2001 exhibition Frederick Carl Frieseke: The Evolution of an American Impressionist.
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